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  1. Fractured Foundations: The Contradiction Between Locke's Ontology and His Moral Philosophy.Paul R. Dehart - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:111-148.
     
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    Leviathan Leashed: The Incoherence of Absolute Sovereign Power.Paul R. DeHart - 2013 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 25 (1):1-37.
    Early modern theorists linked the idea of sovereign power to a conception of absolute power developed during the medieval period. Ockham had reframed the already extant distinction between God's absolute and ordained powers in order to argue that God was free of moral constraint in ordaining natural law for human beings. Thus, the natural law could command the opposite of what God had ordained if He wished to make it so. Bodin extended Ockham's argument to earthly sovereigns, who do not (...)
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  3. Reason, Revelation, and the Civic Order: Political Philosophy and the Claims of Faith.Paul R. DeHart & Carson Holloway (eds.) - 2014 - Northern Illinois University Press.
    While the dominant approaches to the current study of political philosophy are various, with some friendlier to religious belief than others, almost all place constraints on the philosophic and political role of revelation. Mainstream secular political theorists do not entirely disregard religion. But to the extent that they pay attention, their treatment of religious belief is seen more as a political or philosophic problem to be addressed rather than as a positive body of thought from which we might derive important (...)
     
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  4. Uncovering the Constitution's Moral Design.Paul R. DeHart - 2007 - University of Missouri.
    The U.S. Constitution provides a framework for our laws, but what does it have to say about morality? Paul DeHart ferrets out that document’s implicit moral assumptions as he revisits the notion that constitutions are more than merely practical institutional arrangements. In _Uncovering the Constitution’s Moral Design_, he seeks to reveal, elaborate, and then evaluate the Constitution’s normative framework to determine whether it is philosophically sound—and whether it makes moral assumptions that correspond to reality. Rejecting the standard approach of the (...)
     
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