Results for 'Paul Silva Jr'

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  1.  2
    Altruism.John Campbell, Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (3):482.
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  2.  20
    ASSOUN, Paul-Laurent. A Escola de Frankfurt. Trad: Helena Cardoso. São Paulo: Ática, 1991.Franklin Ferreira Silva - 2013 - Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 4 (7):113-118.
    Resenha do livro "A Escola de Frankfurt" do autor Paul-Laurent Assoun, obra complememtar sobre a formação e estruturação teórica sobre a Escola de Frankfut, sua história e seus principais autores.
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  3. Apresentação: Paul Thagard e a revolução quí­mica de Lavoisier.Marcos Rodrigues da Silva & Miriam Giro - 2007 - Princípios 14 (22):261-263.
    Apresentaçáo da traduçáo do artigo de Paul Thagard.
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  4.  13
    Recensão a: Rosa, E. B.; Santos; F. B., Marquetti, F.; Dezotti, M. C. C.; Mass i, M. L.; Carvalho, S. M.; Ribeiro Jr., W. A. - Hinos homéricos: tradução, notas e estudo. [REVIEW]Maria de Fátima Silva - 2011 - Humanitas 63:792-794.
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  5.  86
    A Bayesian Explanation of the Irrationality of Sexist and Racist Beliefs Involving Generic Content.Paul Silva - forthcoming - Synthese:1-23.
    Various sexist and racist beliefs ascribe certain negative qualities to people of a given sex or race. Epistemic allies are people who think that in normal circumstances rationality requires the rejection of such sexist and racist beliefs upon learning of many counter-instances, i.e. members of these groups who lack the target negative quality. Accordingly, epistemic allies think that those who give up their sexist or racist beliefs in such circumstances are rationally responding to their evidence, while those who do not (...)
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  6. Ordinary Objects and Series‐Style Answers to the Special Composition Question.Paul Silva - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):69-88.
    The special composition question asks, roughly, under what conditions composition occurs. The common sense view is that composition only occurs among some things and that all and only ‘ordinary objects’ exist. Peter van Inwagen has marshaled a devastating argument against this view. The common sense view appears to commit one to giving what van Inwagen calls a ‘series-style answer’ to the special composition question, but van Inwagen argues that series-style answers are impossible because they are inconsistent with the transitivity of (...)
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  7.  12
    Can Worsnip’s Strategy Solve the Puzzle of Misleading Higher-Order Apparent Evidence?Paul Silva - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    It's plausible to think that we're rationally required to follow our total evidence. It's also plausible to think that there are coherence requirements on rationality. It's also plausible to think that higher-order evidence can be misleading. Several epistemologists have recognized the puzzle these claims generate, and the puzzle seems to have only startling and unattractive solutions that involve the rejection of intuitive principles. Yet Alex Worsnip (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, forthcoming) has recently argued that this puzzle has a tidy, attractive, (...)
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  8.  18
    Explaining Enkratic Asymmetries: Knowledge-First Style.Paul Silva - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    There are two different kinds of enkratic principles for belief: evidential enkratic principles and normative enkratic principles. It's frequently taken for granted that there's not an important difference between them. But evidential enkratic principles are undermined by considerations that gain no traction at all against their normative counterparts. The idea that such an asymmetry exists between evidential and normative enkratic principles is surprising all on its own. It is also something that calls out for explanation. Similarly, the considerations that undermine (...)
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  9.  17
    Justified Group Belief Is Evidentially Responsible Group Belief.Paul Silva - forthcoming - Episteme:1-20.
    What conditions must be satisfied if a group is to count as having a justified belief? Jennifer Lackey (2016 Phil Review) has recently argued that any adequate account of group justification must be sensitive (in certain ways) to both the evidence actually possessed by enough of a group’s operative members as well as the evidence those members should have possessed. I first draw attention to a range of objections to Lackey’s specific view of group justification and a range of concrete (...)
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  10.  63
    How Doxastic Justification Helps Us Solve the Puzzle of Misleading Higher-Order Evidence.Paul Silva - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (S1):308-328.
    Certain plausible evidential requirements and coherence requirements on rationality seem to yield dilemmas of rationality (in a specific, objectionable sense) when put together with the possibility of misleading higher-order evidence. Epistemologists have often taken such dilemmas to be evidence that we’re working with some false principle. In what follows I show how one can jointly endorse an evidential requirement, a coherence requirement, and the possibility of misleading higher-order evidence without running afoul of dilemmas of rationality. The trick lies in observing (...)
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  11.  66
    Knowing How to Put Knowledge First in the Theory of Justification.Paul Silva - 2017 - Episteme 14 (4):393-412.
    I provide a novel knowledge-first account of justification that avoids the pitfalls of existing accounts while preserving the underlying insight of knowledge-first epistemologies: that knowledge comes first. The view I propose is, roughly, this: justification is grounded in our practical knowledge (know-how) concerning the acquisition of propositional knowledge (knowledge-that). I first refine my thesis in response to immediate objections. In subsequent sections I explain the various ways in which this thesis is theoretically superior to existing knowledge-first accounts of justification. The (...)
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  12. Taxation, Economic Prosperity, and Distributive Justice: Volume 23, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    What constitutes a just tax system, and what are its moral foundations? Should a society's tax regime be designed to achieve a just distribution of wealth among its citizens, or should such a regime be designed to promote economic growth, rising standards of living, and increasing levels of employment? Are these two goals compatible or incompatible? Why should justice not require, or at least lead to, an increase in general prosperity? The essays in this volume examine the history of tax (...)
     
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  13.  42
    Why Worry About Epistemic Circularity?Michael P. Lynch & Paul Silva - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41:33-52.
    Although Alston believed epistemically circular arguments were able to justify their conclusions, he was also disquieted by them. We will argue that Alston was right to be disquieted. We explain Alston’s view of epistemic circularity, the considerations that led him to accept it, and the purposes he thought epistemically circular arguments could serve. We then build on some of Alston’s remarks and introduce further limits to the usefulness of such arguments and introduce a new problem that stems from those limits. (...)
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  14. Liberalism: Old and New: Volume 24, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this collection, thirteen prominent philosophers and political scientists address the nature of liberalism, its origins, and its meaning and proper interpretation. Some essays examine the writings of liberalism's earliest defenders, like John Locke and Adam Smith, or the influence of classical liberalism on the American founders. Some focus on the Progressive movement and the rise of the administrative state, while others defend particular conceptions of liberalism or examine liberal theories of justice, including those of John Rawls and Robert Nozick. (...)
     
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  15.  17
    Etiological Information and Diminishing Justification.Paul Silva - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (2):1-25.
    Sometimes it’s reasonable to reduce confidence in a proposition in response to gaining etiological information. Suppose, for example, a theist learns that her theism is ‘due to’ her religious upbringing. There is a clear range of cases where it would be reasonable for her to respond by slightly decreasing her confidence in God’s existence. So long as reasonability and justification are distinct, this reasonability claim would appear consistent with the thesis that this kind of etiological information cannot, all by itself, (...)
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  16. Self-Interest: Volume 14, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    '[T]he good man should be a lover of self.' Aristotle wrote. 'For he will both himself profit by doing noble acts, and will benefit his fellows … '. Yet in much of contemporary moral philosophy, concern for one's own interests is considered a non-moral issue, while concern for the interests of others is paradigmatically moral. Indeed, a central issue in ethical theory involves the proper balance to be struck between prudence and morality, between the pursuit of one's own good and (...)
     
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  17.  11
    The J. H. B. Bookshelf.Paula Findlen, Ronald Rainger, Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis, Richard W. Burkhardt Jr & Diane Paul - 1995 - Journal of the History of Biology 28 (2):369-379.
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  18.  1
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Naichen Chen, Roger R. Woock, Joseph di Bona, Laurie Mcdade, Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, Marsha V. Krotseng, Gary R. Galluzzo, Robert L. Crowson, Edward T. Silva, Sheila Slaughter, Pizzillo Jr & Keith L. Raitz - 1985 - Educational Studies 16 (1):56-95.
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  19. Altruism: Volume 10, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Confronting crucial and difficult issues, the ten authors whose essays appear in this volume offer fresh perspectives on the nature and value of altruism. This collection of essays on moral philosophy deal with the balance to be struck between egoism and altruism - that is, between pursuing one's own interests and serving the interest of others - and with related issues. Contributions examine the relationship between altruism and rationality; consider cases in which one's personal needs and goals may legitimately be (...)
     
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  20. Autonomy: Volume 20, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    A central idea in moral and political philosophy, 'autonomy' is generally understood as some form of self-governance or self-direction. Certain Stoics, modern philosophers such as Spinoza, and most importantly, Immanuel Kant, are among the great philosophers who have offered important insights on the concept. Some theorists analyze autonomy in terms of the self being moved by its higher-order desires. Others argue that autonomy must be understood in terms of acting from reason or from a sense of moral duty independent of (...)
     
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  21. Cultural Pluralism and Moral Knowledge: Volume 11, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in Cultural Pluralism and Moral Knowledge deal with philosophical issues that arise from the existence of a diversity of cultural traditions. The discussions range from broad examinations of the relevance of cultural pluralism to morality, to studies of specific cultural practices. Some essays explore the relationship between pluralism and political theory; some contrast pluralism with relativism or distinguish it from reasonable disagreement. Others propose and defend a set of principles that apply to all societies, forming the foundation of (...)
     
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  22. Contemporary Political and Social Philosophy: Volume 12, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays represent the latest research of a number of prominent political theorists. The essays explore the role of government, the nature of public discourse and the obligations of citizens. Some examine the sources of our need for government, asking what form of government we should establish and whether a single form can be suitable for all societies. Some seek to discover the proper aims of government - asking, for example, whether government should promote equality among its citizens or whether (...)
     
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  23. Democracy: Volume 17, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume, first published in 2000, explore questions about democracy that are relevant to political philosophy and political theory. Some essays discuss the appropriate ends of government or examine the difficulties involved in determining and carrying out the will of the people. Some address questions relating to the kinds of influence citizens can or should have over their representatives, asking, for example, whether individuals have a duty to vote, or whether inequalities in political influence among citizens can (...)
     
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  24. Economic Rights.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    Economic rights - rights to use, possess, exchange, and otherwise dispose of property - are at the centre of some of the most important and fundamental disputes in Western moral and political theory. This book provides a fresh look at assumptions that are sometimes overlooked in debates about capitalism, socialism and the welfare state. Essays in this book by internationally renowned academic lawyers, economists, and philosophers, explore what sort of economic rights people ought to have, how they ought to be (...)
     
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  25. Freedom of Association: Volume 25, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Freedom of association is a cherished liberal value, both for classical liberals who are generally antagonistic toward government interference in the choices made by individuals, and for contemporary liberals who are more sanguine about the role of government. However, there are fundamental differences between the two viewpoints in the status that they afford to associational freedom. While classical liberals ground their support for freedom of association on the core notion of individual liberty, contemporary liberals usually conceive of freedom of association (...)
     
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  26. Justice and Global Politics: Volume 23, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since the end of the Cold War, there has been increasing interest in the global dimensions of a host of public policy issues - issues involving war and peace, terrorism, international law, regulation of commerce, environmental protection, and disparities of wealth, income, and access to medical care. Especially pressing is the question of whether it is possible to formulate principles of justice that are valid not merely within a single society but across national borders. The thirteen essays in this volume (...)
     
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  27. Liberalism and Capitalism: Volume 28, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    What are the core values of liberalism and how can they best be promoted? Liberals in the classical tradition championed individual freedom, limited government and a capitalist economic system with strong rights to private property. Contemporary liberals, in contrast, embrace more egalitarian values and allow for a far more prominent role for government intervention in the market to reduce inequality, redistribute wealth and regulate economic activity. What accounts for these very disparate liberal views of property rights and economic freedom? How (...)
     
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  28. Liberalism: Old and New: Volume 24, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this collection, thirteen prominent philosophers and political scientists address the nature of liberalism, its origins, and its meaning and proper interpretation. Some essays examine the writings of liberalism's earliest defenders, like John Locke and Adam Smith, or the influence of classical liberalism on the American founders. Some focus on the Progressive movement and the rise of the administrative state, while others defend particular conceptions of liberalism or examine liberal theories of justice, including those of John Rawls and Robert Nozick. (...)
     
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  29. Morality and Politics: Volume 21, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Complicating the ancient debate over the intersection of morality and politics are diverse definitions of fundamental concepts: the right and the good, virtue and vice, personal liberty and public interest. Divisions abound, also, about whether politics should be held to a higher moral standard or whether pragmatic considerations or realpolitik should prevail. Perhaps the two poles are represented most conspicuously by Aristotle and Machiavelli. These essays address perennial concerns in political and moral theory and underscore the rekindled yearning of many (...)
     
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  30. Moral Knowledge: Volume 18, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers since ancient times have pondered how we can know whether moral claims are true or false. The first half of the twentieth century witnessed widespread skepticism concerning the possibility of moral knowledge. Indeed, some argued that moral statements lacked cognitive content altogether, because they were not susceptible to empirical verification. The British philosopher A. J. Ayer contends that 'They are pure expressions of feeling and as such do not come under the category of truth and falsehood. They are unverifiable (...)
     
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  31. Moral Obligation: Volume 27, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The notion of obligation of what an agent owes to himself, to others, or to society generally occupies a central place in morality. But what are the sources of our moral obligations and what are their limits? To what extent do obligations vary in their stringency and severity, and does it make sense to talk about imperfect obligations, that is, obligations that leave the individual with a broad range of freedom to determine how and when to fulfil them? The twelve (...)
     
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  32. New Essays in Political and Social Philosophy: Volume 29, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether it is a result of nature, the consequence of a choice to escape the state of nature, or the outcome of some other process of deliberation, the fact of human association gives rise to recurrent themes in political and social philosophy. The character and requirements of justice, the profile of political legitimacy, and the relationship between the powers of government and the rights of the governed are some of the subjects of ongoing consideration and debate in the disciplines of (...)
     
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  33. Natural Law and Modern Moral Philosophy: Volume 18, Social Philosophy and Policy, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays address some of the most intriguing questions raised by natural law theory and its implications for law, morality, and public policy. some of the essays explore the implications that natural law theory has for jurisprudence, asking what natural law suggests about the use of legal devices such as constitutions and precedents. Other essays examine the connections between natural law and various political concepts, such as citizens' rights and the obligation of citizens to obey their government.
     
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  34. Natural Rights Individualism and Progressivism in American Political Philosophy: Volume 29, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Jeffrey Paul & Miller Jr (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this collection investigate two political traditions and their critical interactions. The first series of essays deals with the development of natural rights individualism, some examining its origins in the thought of the seminal political theorist, John Locke, and the influential constitutional theorist, Montesquieu, others the impact of their theories on intellectual leaders during the American Revolution and the Founding era, and still others the culmination of this tradition in the writings of nineteenth-century individualists such as Lysander Spooner. (...)
     
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  35. Natural Resources, the Environment, and Human Welfare: Volume 26, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Modern industrial societies have achieved a level of economic prosperity undreamed of in earlier times, but in the view of the contemporary environmental movement, the prosperity has come at the cost of serious degradations to the natural world. For environmental advocates, problems such as resource depletion, air and water pollution, global warming and the loss of biodiversity represent due threats to the well-being of human societies and the planet itself. But just how serious are these threats and how should we (...)
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  36. Ownership and Justice: Volume 27, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The institution of private property lies at the heart of contemporary Western societies. However, what are the limits of property ownership? Do principles of justice require some measure of governmental redistribution of property in order to relieve poverty or to promote greater equality among citizens? And what do principles of justice have to say about individuals' ownership of their own talents and the products of their labor, and about the initial acquisition of land and natural resources? The essays in this (...)
     
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  37. Objectivism, Subjectivism, and Relativism in Ethics: Volume 25, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do we desire things because they are good, or are they good because we desire them? Objectivists answer that we desire things because they are good; subjectivists answer that things are good because we desire them. Further, does it make sense to account for moral disagreement by claiming, as the moral relativist does, that something might be good for one person but not for another? Some essays in this book consider whether objective moral truths can be grounded in an understanding (...)
     
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  38. Personal Identity: Volume 22, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is a person? What makes me the same person today that I was yesterday or will be tomorrow? Philosophers have long pondered these questions. In Plato's Symposium, Socrates observed that all of us are constantly undergoing change: we experience physical changes to our bodies, as well as changes in our 'manners, customs, opinions, desires, pleasures, pains, [and] fears'. Aristotle theorized that there must be some underlying 'substratum' that remains the same even as we undergo these changes. John Locke rejected (...)
     
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  39. Problems of Market Liberalism: Volume 15, Social Philosophy and Policy, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays assess market liberal or libertarian political theory. They provide insights into the limits of government, develop market-oriented solutions to pressing social problems, and explore some defects in traditional libertarian theory and practice. Some of the essays deal with crucial theoretical issues, asking whether the promotion of citizens' welfare can serve as the justification for the establishment of government, or inquiring into the constraints on individual behavior that exist in a liberal social order. Some essays explore market liberal or (...)
     
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  40. Property Rights: Volume 11, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Any comprehensive discussion of property must draw on a range of disciplines - philosophy, politics, economics, and legal theory - and must address a number of fundamental questions: What is the nature of ownership, and should there be limits on the rights that attend it? Should property be held privately or in common, or should some combination of these two types of ownership prevail? To what extent does the legitimacy of a system of property depend on considerations of economic efficiency (...)
     
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  41. Responsibility: Volume 16, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume address questions about responsibility that arise in moral philosophy and legal theory. Some analyse different theories of causality, asking which theory offers the best account of human agency and the most satisfactory resolution of troubling controversies about free will and determinism. Some essays look at responsibility in the legal realm, seeking to determine how the law should assign liability for negligence, or whether the courts should allow defendants to offer excuses for their wrongdoing or to (...)
     
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  42. Scientific Innovation, Philosophy, and Public Policy: Volume 13, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Recent and ongoing developments in science and technology - such as the prevention and treatment of disease through genetics and the development of increasingly sophisticated computer systems with wide-ranging applications - hold out the promise of vastly improving the quality of human life, but they can also raise serious ethical, legal, and public policy questions. The thirteen essays in this volume address these questions and related issues from a variety of perspectives. Written by prominent philosophers, economists, and legal theorists, these (...)
     
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  43. The Communitarian Challenge to Liberalism: Volume 13, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    The thirteen essays in this volume approach the liberal-communitarian debate from a variety of perspectives. Some discuss disagreements between liberals and communitarians over the nature of moral agency and the proper functions of government. Some examine alternative ways of conceiving liberalism or community, or challenge widely held beliefs about the harmful effects of capitalism on community, or about the value of traditional practices as guides to judicial reasoning. Other essays seek to determine whether it makes sense to think of societies (...)
     
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  44. The Right to Privacy: Volume 17, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    The distinction between the public and private spheres of human life is a critical facet of contemporary moral, political, and legal thought. Much recent scholarship has invoked privacy as an important component of individual autonomy and as something essential to the ability of individuals to lead complete and fulfilling lives. However, the protection of one's privacy can interfere with the ability of others to pursue their own projects and with the capacity of the state to achieve collective goals. Developing an (...)
     
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  45. The Welfare State: Volume 14, Part 2.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays explore the history and justification of the welfare state and examine private alternatives to the public provision of aid. Essays focus on the nature of personal responsibility, the impact of identity politics on the welfare state, and the various strategies that have been proposed to deal with the problem of poverty. Others assess the success or failure of public housing, government assistance to veterans, or other specific programmes, suggesting ways of reforming, expanding, or replacing them.
     
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  46. Utilitarianism: Volume 26, Part 1: The Aggregation Question.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Utilitarianism and other aggregationist moral theories view the public interest or the general welfare as an aggregate of individual goods. But critics of these theories question whether there is adequate justification for employing the concept of an aggregate social good. How are we supposed to sum up individual interests? Is it even possible to compare the utilities of different people or to assign values to individual utilities that can be added or subtracted? If not, how is the general good to (...)
     
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  47. Virtue and Vice: Volume 15, Part 1.Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume discuss a range of questions relating to virtue ethics - a form of moral theory that has gained considerable attention in recent years. These questions include: what traits ought to be considered virtues? What is the proper place of virtue in a complete moral theory? Is it true, as the ancients thought, that there is a 'unity of virtue', so that having one virtue entails having all the others? What is the nature of vice or (...)
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  48. What Should Constitutions Do?Ellen Frankel Paul, Miller Jr & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume - written by prominent philosophers, political scientists and legal scholars - address the basic purposes of constitutions and their status as fundamental law. Some deal with specific constitutional provisions: they ask, for example, which branches of government should have the authority to conduct foreign policy, or how the judiciary should be organized, or what role a preamble should play in a nation's founding document. Other essays explore questions of constitutional design: they consider the advantages of (...)
     
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  49. Can Worsnip's Strategy Solve the Puzzle of Misleading Higher-Order Apparent Evidence?Paul Silva - forthcoming - Inquiry:1-13.
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  50. Epistemic Justification: Propositional, Doxastic, Personal.Paul Silva - manuscript
    Justification is a crucial notion to epistemic theorizing. But there is no single concept of justification. Most epistemologists seem to agree that there is some important difference between, what's called propositional justification and doxastic justification. But from this point controversy ensues. While everyone seems to agree that there is such a thing a propositional justification, there is non-trivial disagreement as to how it is related to our other normative and evaluative notions (reasons, good, permissible, blameless, etc.). Moreover, there is disagreement (...)
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