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Paul T. Brockelman [6]Paul Taylor Brockelman [1]
  1. What is Phenomenology? And Other Essays.Pierre Thévenaz, Paul T. Brockelman, Charles Courtney & James M. Edie - 1962 - Chicago: Quadrangle Books.
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  2.  5
    Existential Phenomenology and the World of Ordinary Experience: An Introduction.Paul T. Brockelman - 1980 - Upa.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  3. Cosmology and Creation: The Spiritual Significance of Contemporary Cosmology.Paul T. Brockelman - 1999 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The Big Bang is a myth, says Paul Brockelman in this fascinating look at the spiritual side of modern cosmology. But it is a myth in the best sense--a fully realized creation story, one that, for all its scientific origins, has the power to transform us spiritually. In Cosmology and Creation, philosopher and religious scholar Brockelman seeks to bridge the gap between the scientific and the spiritual, to bring together the head and the heart. We have isolated the two realms (...)
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  4.  7
    Myths and Stories: The Depth Dimension of Our Lives.Paul T. Brockelman - 1980 - Philosophy Today 24 (1):73-88.
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    Myths and Stories: The Depth Dimension of Our Lives.Paul T. Brockelman - 1980 - Philosophy Today 24 (1):73-88.
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  6. Speaking.Paul T. Brockelman (ed.) - 1965 - Northwestern University Press.
    _Speaking _is an introduction to the philosophy of language from an existential and phenomenological point of view. Gusdorf's central concern is to analyze speech within the context of human reality. Speech is an abstraction, but speaking is not, he says. Speaking expresses the experimental and dialectical relation of man, nature, and society. It is through speaking that nature is sublimated into the meant and expressive world of human reality.
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