4 found
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  1.  47
    Hunting ≠ Predation.Paul Veatch Moriarty & Mark Woods - 1997 - Environmental Ethics 19 (4):391-404.
    Holmes Rolston has defended certain forms of hunting and meat eating when these activities are seen as natural participation in the food chains in which we evolved. Ned Hettinger has suggested that some of Rolston’s principles that govern our interactions with plants and animals might appear to be inconsistent with Rolston’s defense of these activities. Hettinger attempts to show that they are not. We argue that Rolston’s principles are not consistent with hunting, given Hettinger’s modifications. In his defense of Rolston, (...)
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  2.  46
    Nature Naturalized: A Darwinian Defense of the Nature/Culture Distinction.Paul Veatch Moriarty - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):227-246.
    Philosophical naturalists deny the existence of anything supernatural, such as God, souls, demons, ghosts, angels, witchcraft, miracles, etc. They believe that human beings are animals whose existence is entirely governed by the same laws which govern the rest of the natural world. However, some environmentalists value nature intrinsically and aesthetically, and in doing so conceive of nature as that which is distinguished from the products of human culture. Some philosophical naturalists have claimed that any attempt to distinguish nature from the (...)
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  3.  22
    The Ethics of Assisting Domestic and Wild Animals.Paul Veatch Moriarty - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (3):315-317.
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  4.  9
    Nature Naturalized: A Darwinian Defense of the Nature/Culture Distinction.Paul Veatch Moriarty - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):227-246.
    Philosophical naturalists deny the existence of anything supernatural, such as God, souls, demons, ghosts, angels, witchcraft, miracles, etc. They believe that human beings are animals whose existence is entirely governed by the same laws which govern the rest of the natural world. However, some environmentalists value nature intrinsically and aesthetically, and in doing so conceive of nature as that which is distinguished from the products of human culture. Some philosophical naturalists have claimed that any attempt to distinguish nature from the (...)
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