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Paul W. Taylor [45]Paul Warren Taylor [1]
  1. Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1986
    What rational justification is there for conceiving of all living things as possessing inherent worth? In Respect for Nature, Paul Taylor draws on biology, moral philosophy, and environmental science to defend a biocentric environmental ethic in which all life has value. Without making claims for the moral rights of plants and animals, he offers a reasoned alternative to the prevailing anthropocentric view--that the natural environment and its wildlife are valued only as objects for human use or enjoyment. Respect for Nature (...)
     
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  2. The Ethics of Respect for Nature.Paul W. Taylor - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (3):197-218.
    I present the foundational structure for a life-centered theory of environmental ethics. The structure consists of three interrelated components. First is the adopting of a certain ultimate moral attitude toward nature, which I call “respect for nature.” Second is a belief system that constitutes a way of conceiving of the natural world and of our place in it. This belief system underlies and supports the attitude in a way that makes it an appropriate attitude to take toward the Earth’s natural (...)
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  3. Principles of Ethics: An Introduction.Paul W. Taylor - 1975 - Dickenson Pub. Co..
     
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  4.  37
    Normative Discourse.Paul W. Taylor - 1973 - Westport, Conn., Greenwood Press.
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  5.  89
    The Ethics of Respect for Nature.Paul W. Taylor - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (3):197-218.
    I present the foundational structure for a life-centered theory of environmental ethics. The structure consists of three interrelated components. First is the adopting of a certain ultimate moral attitude toward nature, which I call “respect for nature.” Second is a belief system that constitutes a way of conceiving of the natural world and of our place in it. This belief system underlies and supports the attitude in a way that makes it an appropriate attitude to take toward the Earth’s natural (...)
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  6.  4
    Frontmatter.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  7. In Defense of Biocentrism.Paul W. Taylor - 1983 - Environmental Ethics 5 (3):237-243.
    Gene Spitler has raised certain objections to my views on the biocentric outlook: (1) that a factual error is involved in the assertion that organisms pursue their own good, (2) that there is an inconsistency in the biocentric outlook, (3) that it is impossible for anyone to adopt that outlook, and (4) that the outlook entails unacceptable moral judgments, for example, that killing insects and wildfiowers is as morally reprehensible as killing humans. I reply to each of these points, showing (...)
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  8.  51
    On Taking the Moral Point of View.Paul W. Taylor - 1978 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):35-61.
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  9. Are Humans Superior to Animals and Plants?Paul W. Taylor - 1984 - Environmental Ethics 6 (2):149-160.
    Louis G. Lombardi’s arguments in support of the claim that humans have greater inherent worth than other living things provide a clear account of how it is possible to conceive of the relation between humans and nonhumans in this way. Upon examining his arguments, however, it seems that he does not succeed in establishing any reason to believe that humans actually do have greater inherent worth than animals and plants.
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  10. Problems of Moral Philosophy.Paul W. Taylor - 1972 - Encino, Calif., Dickenson Pub. Co..
     
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  11. Reverse Discrimination and Compensatory Justice.Paul W. Taylor - 1973 - Analysis 33 (6):177 - 182.
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  12.  47
    Social Science and Ethical Relativism.Paul W. Taylor - 1958 - Journal of Philosophy 55 (1):32-44.
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  13.  24
    In Defense of Biocentrism.Paul W. Taylor - 1983 - Environmental Ethics 5 (3):237-243.
    Gene Spitler has raised certain objections to my views on the biocentric outlook: that a factual error is involved in the assertion that organisms pursue their own good, that there is an inconsistency in the biocentric outlook, that it is impossible for anyone to adopt that outlook, and that the outlook entails unacceptable moral judgments, for example, that killing insects and wildfiowers is as morally reprehensible as killing humans. I reply to each of these points, showing that the biocentric outlook (...)
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  14.  54
    Frankena on Environmental Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1981 - The Monist 64 (3):313-324.
    In his article “Ethics and the Environment” William K. Frankena distinguishes eight types of ethical theories which could generate moral rules and/or judgments concerning how rational agents should act with regard to the natural environment. The eight types are differentiated by their conceptions of moral subjects or patients. Each has its own view of the class of entities with respect to which moral agents can have duties and responsibilities. The eight types may be briefly delineated as follows: 1. Only what (...)
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  15.  18
    Are Humans Superior to Animals and Plants?Paul W. Taylor - 1984 - Environmental Ethics 6 (2):149-160.
    Louis G. Lombardi’s arguments in support of the claim that humans have greater inherent worth than other living things provide a clear account of how it is possible to conceive of the relation between humans and nonhumans in this way. Upon examining his arguments, however, it seems that he does not succeed in establishing any reason to believe that humans actually do have greater inherent worth than animals and plants.
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  16. The Normative Function of Metaethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1958 - Philosophical Review 67 (1):16-32.
  17.  27
    Need Statements.Paul W. Taylor - 1958 - Analysis 19 (5):106 - 111.
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  18.  60
    The Ethnocentric Fallacy.Paul W. Taylor - 1963 - The Monist 47 (4):563-584.
    In Chapter Seven of his book, The Moral Point of View, Professor Kurt Baier draws our attention to an important difference between morality on the one hand and legal systems and customs on the other. He brings out this difference by considering the following questions.
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  19. Four Types of Ethical Relativism.Paul W. Taylor - 1954 - Philosophical Review 63 (4):500-516.
  20.  22
    Moral Rhetoric, Moral Philosophy, and the Science of Morals.Paul W. Taylor - 1959 - Journal of Philosophy 56 (17):689-704.
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  21. Knowledge and Value Introductory Readings in Philosophy.Elmer Sprague & Paul W. Taylor - 1959 - Harcourt, Brace.
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  22. Acknowledgments.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  23.  3
    Anthropology and Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (1):121.
  24. Bibliography.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 315-324.
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  25.  1
    Contents.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  26.  27
    C. I. Lewis on Value and Fact.Paul W. Taylor - 1953 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (2):239-245.
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  27.  14
    Can We Grade Without Criteria?Paul W. Taylor - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):187 – 203.
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  28.  1
    Five. Do Animals and Plants Have Rights?Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 219-255.
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  29.  2
    Four. The Ethical System.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 169-218.
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  30. Foreword to the 25th Anniversary Edition.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  31. Index.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 325-329.
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  32.  62
    Inherent Value and Moral Rights.Paul W. Taylor - 1987 - The Monist 70 (1):15-30.
    In Chapter Seven of The Case for Animal Rights’ Tom Regan propounds and analyzes a concept of inherent value. He then argues that all humans and animals that satisfy what he calls the “subject-of-a-life criterion” have this kind of value and have it equally. In Chapter Eight of the book Regan draws a close connection between an individual’s having inherent value and its being a bearer of moral rights. I shall examine each of these points in turn in the first (...)
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  33.  22
    Justice and Utility.Paul W. Taylor - 1972 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):327 - 350.
    That utility is not a sufficient test for a set of social rules to be morally binding upon a group of persons has been argued in a number of recent books and articles. Yet it is generally conceded in these arguments that a group's observance of rules makes possible greater benefits than would accrue if each did not associate himself with others under the rules. It is not denied that the practice of morality is socially advantageous. What is denied is (...)
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  34.  17
    Lies/Reel Tor Lllature: A Theory of Environmental Ethios.Paul W. Taylor - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  35.  69
    Moral Virtue and Responsibility for Character.Paul W. Taylor - 1964 - Analysis 25 (1):17 - 23.
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  36. Normative Discourse.Paul W. Taylor - 1962 - Ethics 73 (1):67-69.
     
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  37.  2
    One. Environmental Ethics and Human Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 1-58.
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  38.  67
    Prescribing and Evaluating.Paul W. Taylor - 1962 - Mind 71 (282):213-230.
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  39. Problems of Moral Philosophy an Introduction to Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1967 - Dickenson Pub. Co.
     
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  40.  1
    Response.Paul W. Taylor - unknown
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  41. Reverse discrimination and compensatory justice.Paul W. Taylor - 1973 - Analysis 33 (6):177.
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  42.  14
    Six. Competing Claims and Priority Principles.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 256-314.
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  43.  4
    The Pragmatic Humanism of F. C. S. Schiller.Paul W. Taylor - 1956 - Philosophical Review 65 (3):418.
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  44.  3
    Two. The Attitude of Respect for Nature.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 59-98.
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  45.  27
    Three. The Biocentric Outlook on Nature.Paul W. Taylor - 2011 - In Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press. pp. 99-168.
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