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  1.  31
    Rethinking radical democracy.Paulina Tambakaki - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (4):498-518.
    Over the course of three decades, vocabularies of radical democracy have pressed their stamp on democratic thought. Trading on the intuition that there is more to democracy than elections, they have generated critical insights into the important role that practices of pluralisation and critique play in bettering institutional politics. As a result, few would today deny the radical democratic contribution to democratic thought. What many might question, however, is its continuing traction. The article probes this question, focusing on the nuanced (...)
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  2.  27
    Cosmopolitanism or agonism? Alternative visions of world order.Paulina Tambakaki - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (1):101-116.
  3.  11
    Human rights, or citizenship?Paulina Tambakaki - 2010 - New York: Birkbeck Law Press.
    Citizenship and human rights in tension : changes, issues and approaches -- Privileging human rights -- The illusive promise of human rights -- Politics and legalism -- Back to citizenship, an agonistic conception.
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  4.  10
    Popular politics in a realist key.Paulina Tambakaki - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (2):91-97.
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    Routledge handbook of psychoanalytic political theory.Paulina Tambakaki - 2022 - Contemporary Political Theory 21 (4):159-164.
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  6.  10
    Why spontaneity matters: Rosa Luxemburg and democracies of grief.Paulina Tambakaki - 2021 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (1):83-101.
    The article seeks to explain why spontaneity, a concept that political theorists have given scant attention to, matters. It argues that it matters because it delivers a capacity for producing democratic change that is urgent to reflect on amidst a prevailing mood of grief over a democracy lost. To stimulate this reflection, the article engages with Rosa Luxemburg’s work, showing how her understanding of spontaneity as an initiative that delivers something for democracy lays the groundwork for a theoretical orientation that (...)
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