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Profile: Pekka Kärkkäinen (University of Helsinki)
  1.  54
    Theology, Philosophy, and Immortality of the Soul in the Late Via Moderna of Erfurt.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2005 - Vivarium 43 (2):337-360.
    In 1513 the Fifth Lateran Council determined that the immortality of the rational soul is not true only in theology, but also in philosophy. The determination can be related also to the actual teaching of philosophy. In the university of Erfurt, Bartholomaeus Arnoldi de Usingen and Jodocus Trutfetter wrote expositions on natural philosophy at that time. Usingen's and Trutfetter's expositions of De anima represent a position, which faithfully follows in methodology and aspirations the tradition of the via moderna. Furthermore, they (...)
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  2.  41
    On the Semantics of 'Human Being' and 'Animal' in Early 16th Century Erfurt.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2004 - Vivarium 42 (2):237-256.
    In his Questions on Aristotle’s De anima, John Buridan faced the problem, whether it follows from the definition of the term ‘animal’ that all quantitative parts of an animal are to be called animals. His solution was that parts of the animal are to be called animals, though in a extraordinary, non-connotative, sense of the term. The problem variously discussed by some later Buridanian authors from Erfurt. Bartholomaeus Arnoldi de Usingen ends up to deny the use of such terms as (...)
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  3.  29
    Psychology and the Soul in Late Medieval Erfurt.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2009 - Vivarium 47 (4):421-443.
    In the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries the University of Erfurt was one of the strongholds of the via moderna in Germany. The present article examines how this school's identity was manifested in discussions on the soul and its powers, engaged in by three Erfurtian philosophers: Johannes Carnificis de Lutrea, Jodocus Trutfetter and Bartholomaeus Arnoldi de Usingen. In the various forms of their expositions these authors reveal a rather uniform stance concerning doctrinal issues. Their positions are largely based on (...)
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  4.  6
    Friedman, Medieval Trinitarian Thought From Aquinas to Ockham. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Viii, 198. $89. ISBN: 9780521117142. [REVIEW]Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2012 - Speculum 87 (4):1196-1197.
  5.  14
    Synderesis in Late Medieval Philosophy and the Wittenberg Reformers.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):881-901.
    The present article discusses the concept of synderesis in the late medieval universities of Erfurt and Leipzig and the later developments in Wittenberg. The comparison between Bartholomaeus Arnoldi of Usingen in Erfurt and Johannes Peyligk in Leipzig shows that school traditions played an important role in the exposition of synderesis by the late medieval scholastic natural philosophers. However, Jodocus Trutfetter's example warns against overemphasizing the importance of the school traditions and reminds us of the manifold history of medieval discussions on (...)
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  6.  4
    Sense Perception, Theories Of.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 1182--1185.
  7.  4
    Philosophical Psychology in 1500 : Erfurt, Padua and Bologna.Pekka Kärkkäinen & Henrik Lagerlund - 2009 - In Sara Heinämaa & Martina Reuter (eds.), Psychology and philosophy : inquiries into the soul from late scholasticism to contemporary thought. Springer.
    The chapter gives a general description of philosophical psychology as it was practiced and taught in the sixteenth century at three of the most important universities of the time, the universities of Erfurt, Padua, and Bologna. Contrary to received notions of the Renaissance it argues that the sixteenth-century philosophical psychology was tightly bound to the Aristotelian tradition. At the University of Erfurt, philosophical psychology was developed with strong adherence to the basic doctrines of Buridanian via moderna, as it had been (...)
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  8.  2
    Internal Senses.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 564--567.
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  9.  1
    Bartholomaeus Arnoldi de Usingen.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 144--145.
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  10.  1
    Objects of Sense Perception in Late Medieval Erfurtian Nominalism.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2008 - In Kärkkäinen Knuuttila (ed.), Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. pp. 187--202.
    The Buridanian view of the concrete cognition as the general characteristics of sense perception was adopted by Jodocus Trutfetter and Bartholomaeus Arnoldi of Usingen. This theory was not accepted merely on the basis of authority, but it was argued against the competing view, which appeared as legitimate inside the late medieval school of via moderna.
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  11.  64
    Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy.Simo Knuuttila & Pekka Kärkkäinen (eds.) - 2008 - Springer.
    In recent years, the rich tradition of various philosophical theories of perception has been increasingly studied by scholars of the history of philosophy of ...
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  12. Jodocus Trutfetter.Pekka Kärkkäinen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 593--594.
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