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  1. Teaching Science at the University Level: What About the Ethics?Penny J. Gilmer - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):173-180.
    Ethics in science is integrated into an interdisciplinary science course called “Science, Technology and Society” (STS). This paper focuses on the section of the course called “Societal Impact on Science and Technology”, which includes the topics Misconduct in Science, Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, and the Use of Human Subjects in Research. Students in the course become aware not only of the science itself, but also of the process of science, some aspects of the history of science, the social responsibilities of (...)
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  2.  47
    Commentary and Criticism on Scientific Positivism.Penny J. Gilmer - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):71-72.
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  3.  56
    Scientific (Mis)Conduct and Social (Ir)Responsibility 27 May 1994, Indiana University, USA.Penny J. Gilmer - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):187-188.
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  4. Transforming Undergraduate Science Teaching Social Constructivist Perspectives.Peter Taylor, Penny J. Gilmer & Kenneth George Tobin - 2002
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  5.  68
    Teaching Social Responsibility: The Manhattan Project: Commentary on “Six Domains of Research Ethics”.Penny J. Gilmer & Michael DuBois - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):206-210.
    This paper discusses the critical necessity of teaching students about the social and ethical responsibilities of scientists. Both a university scientist and a middle school science teacher reflect on the value of teaching the ethical issues that confront scientists. In the development of the atomic bomb in the US-led Manhattan Project, scientists faced the growing threat of atomic bombs by the Germans and Japanese and the ethical issues involved in successfully completing such a destructive weapon. The Manhattan Project is a (...)
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    From Marginality to Legitimate Peripherality: Understanding the Essential Functions of a Women's Program.Ajda Kahveci, Sherry A. Southerland & Penny J. Gilmer - 2008 - Science Education 92 (1):33-64.
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