Results for 'People-seeds example'

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  1. Abortion and Ownership.John Martin Fischer - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 17 (4):275-304.
    I explore two thought-experiments in Judith Jarvis Thomson’s important article, “A Defense of Abortion”: the violinist example and the people-seeds example. I argue (contra Thomson) that you have a moral duty not to unplug yourself from the violinist and also a moral duty not to destroy a people-seed that has landed in your sofa. Nevertheless, I also argue that there are crucial differences between the thought-experiments and the contexts of pregnancy due to rape or to contraceptive failure. (...)
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  2.  8
    Changes in the Meaning of the Term?The People? ? An Example of Conceptual Revolution as Reflected in Semantic Evolution.Steve S. K. Chin - 1972 - Studies in Soviet Thought 12 (2):124-148.
    Analysis of the use of the key term 'the people' shows that it has varied both semantically and syntactically along the time-line of the evolution of the CPC.
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  3.  4
    Earthquakes, People‐Seeds and a Cabin in the Woods.Scott Woodcock - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (1):71-91.
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  4.  32
    Pedagogy and People-Seeds.Scott Woodcock - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):213-235.
    Judith Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion” is one of the most widely taught papers in undergraduate philosophy, yet it is notoriously difficult to teach. Thomson uses simple terminology and imaginative thought experiments, but her philosophical moves are complex and sometimes difficult to explain to a class still mystified by the prospect of being kidnapped to save a critically ill violinist. My aim here is to identify four sources of difficulty that tend to arise when teaching this paper. In my experience, (...)
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  5.  22
    Changes in the Meaning of the Term 'the People' (Jen-Min) — an Example of Conceptual Revolution as Reflected in Semantic Evolution.Steve S. K. Chin - 1972 - Studies in East European Thought 12 (2):124-148.
    Analysis of the use of the key term the people shows that it has varied both semantically and syntactically along the time-line of the evolution of the CPC.
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  6.  3
    Protecting People Who Decline to Participate in Research: An Example From a Prison Setting.P. G. Stiles, M. Epstein, N. Poythress & J. F. Edens - 2011 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (2):15-18.
    Although there is great concern about protecting those who participate in research, little if any concern has been expressed in the literature about protecting “decliners”—individuals who were invited to participate, but did not. However, there are several situations in which potential participants may experience negative consequences if they choose not to participate—for example, the prison setting, where the power imbalance is obvious and the history of research is not a positive one. We offer several options to protect decliners from (...)
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  7.  2
    Multiple Professional Perspectives in Direct Work with Young People: A Case Example.Sharon Rodie - 2008 - Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (3):293-298.
  8.  15
    Population Nucleation, Intensive Agriculture, and Environmental Degradation: The Cahokia Example[REVIEW]William I. Woods - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (2-3):255-261.
    Cahokia, the largest pre-European settlement in North America, was situated on the Middle Mississippi River floodplain and flourished for approximately three hundred years from the 10th century AD onward. The site was favorably located from an environmental standpoint, being proximal to a diversity of microhabitats including expanses of open water and marshes from which the essential, renewable fish protein could be procured. More importantly, the largest local zone of soils characterized as optimal for prehistoric hoe cultivation lay immediately to the (...)
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  9.  59
    Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones.Timothy Morton - 2011 - Continent 1 (3):149-155.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  10.  2
    When Living and Working Well Together in Organizations Changes Into Good Social Coexistence: The Talent Club Case.Marta Elena, Marzana Daniela, Aresi Giovanni & Pozzi Maura - 2016 - World Futures 72 (5-6):266-283.
    In our contemporary age, where a combination of individualism and mutual distrust is unhappily common among people and society is “liquid” and disoriented, so-called intermediate units are a precious resource that promotes positive coexistence within organizations and in local communities, too. The present contribution describes an example of such an intermediate unit, the Talent Club, located in a peripheral neighborhood of a metropolitan area in northern Italy. This case study shows the development of positive living and working together in (...)
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  11.  28
    The Structure of Conventional Morality.Philip Devine - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):243-256.
    In recent years, analytically trained philosophers have given extensive attention to various issues involved in the “culture wars,” including abortion, same-sex marriage, stem-cell research, and assisted suicide. There are, however, moral judgments that virtually no one questions. Defenses of adult-child sex, for example, are rare. There is also “conventional immorality”—the breach of conventional moral standards within roughly defined limits that at least limit the resulting damage to third parties and social institutions. These phenomena frame moral discussion even when, as (...)
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  12. On Philosophy: Notes From a Crisis.John McCumber - 2013 - Stanford University Press.
    Deepening divisions separate today's philosophers, first, from the culture at large; then, from each other; and finally, from philosophy itself. Though these divisions tend to coalesce publicly as debates over the Enlightenment, their roots lie much deeper. Overcoming them thus requires a confrontation with the whole of Western philosophy. Only when we uncover the strange heritage of Aristotle's metaphysics, as reworked, for example, by Descartes and Kant, can we understand contemporary philosophy's inability to dialogue with women, people of color, (...)
     
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  13.  2
    'In a Completely Different Light'? The Role of 'Being Affected' for the Epistemic Perspectives and Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People.Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Martina Franzen - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):57-72.
    In this paper, we explore and discuss the use of the concept of being affected in biomedical decision making processes in Germany. The corresponding German term ‘Betroffenheit’ characterizes on the one hand a relation between a state of affairs and a person and on the other an emotional reaction that involves feelings like concern and empathy with the suffering of others. An example for the increasing relevance of being affected is the postulation of the participation of people with disabilities (...)
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  14.  2
    Giving Voice to Vulnerable People: The Value of Shadowing for Phenomenological Healthcare Research. [REVIEW]Hanneke van der Meide, Carlo Leget & Gert Olthuis - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):731-737.
    Phenomenological healthcare research should include the lived experiences of a broad group of healthcare users. In this paper it is shown how shadowing can give a voice to people in vulnerable situations who are often excluded from interview studies. Shadowing is an observational method in which the researcher observes an individual during a relatively long time. Central aspects of the method are the focus on meaning expressed by the whole body, and an extended stay of the researcher in the phenomenal (...)
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  15. Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't.Jason Slone - 2007 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Why do religious people believe what they shouldn't -- not what others think they shouldn't believe, but things that don't accord with their own avowed religious beliefs? D. Jason Slone terms this phenomenon "theological incorrectness." He argues that it exists because the mind is built in such a way that it's natural for us to think divergent thoughts simultaneously. Human minds are great at coming up with innovative ideas that help them make sense of the world, he says, but those (...)
     
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  16. Causing Disabled People to Exist and Causing People to Be Disabled.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Ethics 116 (1):77-99.
    Attempts to determine or to select what kind of person or people to bring into existence are controversial. This is particularly true of “negative selection” or “selecting against” a certain type of person—that is, the attempt to prevent a person of a certain type, or people of that type, from existing. Virtually everyone agrees that some instances of negative selection are objectionable—for example, that selection against healthy people would be wrong, particularly if this were combined with positive selection of (...)
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  17.  17
    The Individual in Social Care: The Ethics of Care and the 'Personalisation Agenda' in Services for Older People in England.Liz Lloyd - 2010 - Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):188-200.
    The ethic of care provides not only a basis for understanding relationships of care at the micro level but also a potent form of political ethics, relevant to the development of welfare services. Williams (2001), for example, argues that the concept of care has the capacity to be a central referent in social policy?a point at which social and cultural transformations meet with the changing relations of welfare (Williams 2001, p. 470). English social care services are currently in another (...)
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  18.  67
    Why Bad People Can't Be Good Friends.Alexis Elder - 2014 - Ratio 27 (1):84-99.
    Must the best friends necessarily be good people? On the one hand, as Aristotle puts it, ‘people think that the same people are good and also friends’. But on the other hand, friendship sometimes seems to require that one behave badly. For example, a normally honest person might lie to corroborate a friend's story. What I will call closeness, which I take to include sensitivity to friends' subjective values and concerns as well as an inclination to take their subjective (...)
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  19.  19
    Beyond Conventional Civic Participation, Beyond the Moral‐Political Divide: Young People and Contemporary Debates About Citizenship.Helen Haste & Amy Hogan - 2006 - Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):473-493.
    In Western thought, the relationship between the moral and political domains has been dominated by a version of political philosophy which, based on the distinction between ?public? and ?private?, argues that the moral is different from the political. In parallel, and related to this, has been a delineation of the ?political? as concerned with structural aspects of representative democracy, privileging electoral behaviour in particular. We challenge this distinction on the basis that it is not useful for addressing the motivational dimensions (...)
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  20.  84
    People Work to Sustain Systems: A Framework for Understanding Sustainability.Ian Werkheiser & Zachary Piso - 2015 - Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 141 (12).
    Sustainability is commonly recognized as an important goal, but there is little agreement on what sustainability is, or what it requires. This paper looks at some common approaches to sustainability, and while acknowledging the ways in which they are useful, points out an important lacuna: that for something to be sustainable, people must be willing to work to sustain it. The paper presents a framework for thinking about and assessing sustainability which highlights people working to sustain. It also briefly discusses (...)
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  21.  6
    Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Aviad E. Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):433-442.
    The professional and institutional responsibility for handling genetic knowledge is well discussed; less attention has been paid to how lay people and particularly people who are affected by genetic diseases perceive and frame such responsibilities. In this exploratory study we qualitatively examine the attitudes of lay people, patients and relatives of patients in Germany and Israel towards genetic testing. These attitudes are further examined in the national context of Germany and Israel, which represent opposite regulatory approaches and bioethical debates concerning (...)
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  22.  42
    Heuristics and Biases in a Purported Counter-Example to the Acyclicity of 'Better Than'.Alex Voorhoeve - 2008 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (3):285-299.
    Stuart Rachels and Larry Temkin have offered a purported counter-example to the acyclicity of the relationship 'all things considered better than'. This example invokes our intuitive preferences over pairs of alternatives involving a single person's painful experiences of varying intensity and duration. These preferences, Rachels and Temkin claim, are confidently held, entirely reasonable, and cyclical. They conclude that we should drop acyclicity as a requirement of rationality. I argue that, together with the findings of recent research on the (...)
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  23. Why People Are Irrational About Politics.Michael Huemer - manuscript
    I look for explanations for the phenomenon of widespread, strong, and persistent disagreements about political issues. The best explanation is provided by the hypothesis that most people are irrational about politics and not, for example, that political issues are particularly difficult or that we lack sufficient evidence for resolving them. I discuss how this irrationality works and why people are especially irrational about politics.
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  24.  21
    Precis of the Rational Imagination: How People Create Alternatives to Reality.Ruth Mj Byrne - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):439-452.
    The human imagination remains one of the last uncharted terrains of the mind. People often imagine how events might have turned out something had been different. The of reality, those aspects more readily changed, indicate that counterfactual thoughts are guided by the same principles as rational thoughts. In the past, rationality and imagination have been viewed as opposites. But research has shown that rational thought is more imaginative than cognitive scientists had supposed. In The Rational Imagination, I argue that imaginative (...)
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  25.  17
    Taking Care of One's Brain: How Manipulating the Brain Changes People's Selves.Jonna Brenninkmeijer - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (1):107-126.
    The increasing attention to the brain in science and the media, and people’s continuing quest for a better life, have resulted in a successful self-help industry for brain enhancement. Apart from brain books, foods and games, there are several devices on the market that people can use to stimulate their brains and become happier, healthier or more successful. People can, for example, switch their brain state into relaxation or concentration with a light-and-sound machine, they can train their brainwaves to (...)
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  26.  13
    Applying Behavioral Ecology and Behavioral Economics to Conservation and Development Planning: An Example From the Mikea Forest, Madagascar. [REVIEW]Bram Tucker - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (3):190-208.
    Governments and non-govermental organizations (NGOs) that plan projects to conserve the environment and alleviate poverty often attempt to modify rural livelihoods by halting activities they judge to be destructive or inefficient and encouraging alternatives. Project planners typically do so without understanding how rural people themselves judge the value of their activities. When the alternatives planners recommend do not replace the value of banned activities, alternatives are unlikely to be adopted, and local people will refuse to participate. Human behavioral ecology and (...)
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  27.  37
    Beautiful People, Beautiful Things.David E. Cooper - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):247-260.
    This paper sympathetically examines the neglected virtue-centric idea that the primary location of beauty is in bodily expressions of human virtues, so that things like buildings are beautiful only because of an appropriate relationship they have to beautiful people. After a brief history of the idea as articulated by, for example, Kant, it is then distinguished from accounts of beauty with which it might be confused, such as the view that something is beautiful only if it helps to instil (...)
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  28.  41
    Defending Gaita's Example of Saintly Behaviour.Young Elizabeth Drummond - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):191 - 202.
    Raimond Gaita's example of saintly love, in which the visit of a nun to psychiatric patients has profound effects on him, has been criticised for being an odd and unconvincing example of saintliness. I defend Gaita against four specific criticisms; firstly, that the nun achieves nothing spectacular, but merely adopts a certain attitude towards people; secondly, that Gaita must already have certain beliefs for the example to work; thirdly, that to be acclaimed a saint requires a saintly (...)
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  29.  81
    Moral Theorizing and Intuition Pumps; Or, Should We Worry About People’s Everyday Intuitions About Ethical Issues?James McBain - 2005 - The Midwest Quarterly 46 (3):268-283.
    Intuitions are funny things. Intuitions would seem to be these fluid, temporary mental states that we form minute by minute. On the face of it, they would seem to have no real value. But, when we ask whether a particular theory is true, we usually turn to our intuitions. This is nowhere more prevalent than in moral theorizing. When we attempt to show that a particular moral theory is mistaken, we usually present cases that yield counterintuitive results for the theory. (...)
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  30.  15
    Enemy of the People: Simmel, Ibsen, and the Civic Legacy of Nietzschean Sociology.Ralph Leck - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (3):133-147.
    The fall of Communism continued an ongoing weakening of Marxist ideology, which had been hegemonic among the European Left since the Great War. While the decline of Marxist thought can be justly seen negatively as the historical correlative of globalization, this decline has also produced cultural space for a re-evaluation of non-Marxist critiques of capitalist civilization. One example of a powerful non-Marxist critique of capitalist civilization is Georg Simmel's sociology of money culture. Before turning to Simmel's radical critique, this (...)
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  31.  35
    Daddy, Why Are People so Complex?Allan L. Combs - 2006 - World Futures 62 (6):464 – 472.
    The implications of Warren McCulloch's 1945 concept of heterarchy are analyzed in terms of human value and motivational systems. The results demonstrate the near-impossibility of predicting behavior on the basis of any hierarchical scheme, or even which among a set of hierarchical schemes will be selected as the basis of a behavioral choice. Thus, for example, people regularly say one thing and do another.
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  32.  2
    Bringing Religious Traditions Into Educational Theory: Making an Example of Joseph Smith, Jr.Bryan R. Warnick - 2004 - Educational Theory 54 (4):345-364.
    Educational theorists should engage more deeply with normative religious traditions because people often consult their traditions for guidance about education. Projects that work within such traditions, however, often seem irrelevant or irrational to those on the outside. In contrast, I argue that there are at least three intellectually respectable approaches to religious engagement in mainstream educational theory. I focus on what I call the “educational religious criticism” approach, and, as an example, I offer an analysis of Joseph Smith, Jr., (...)
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  33.  62
    Offloading Memory to the Environment: A Quantitative Example[REVIEW]J. Case - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (3):387-89.
    R.W. Ashby maintained that people and animals do not have to remember as much as one might think since considerable information is stored in the environment. Presented herein is an everyday, quantitative example featuring calculation of the number bits of memory that can be off-loaded to the environment. The example involves one’s storing directions to a friend’s house. It is also argued that the example works with or without acceptance of the extended mind hypothesis. Additionally, a brief (...)
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  34. In Defense of the “Living-Dead” in Traditional African Thought: The Yoruba Example.Oladele Balogun - 2009 - Philosophia 38 (1).
    The paper attempts to provide a philosophical justification for the belief in the living-dead among the traditional Africans using the Yoruba as an example. It argues that in spite of the various criticisms leveled against the belief in the living-dead among the traditional Africans, this belief can be rationally defended and philosophically understood within the conceptual scheme of the traditional Yoruba thought. The paper argues that the link between the living and the livingdead possesses social as well as moral (...)
     
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  35.  7
    Seeds: Agents of Cheng(誠) Intentionality.Daihyun Chung - 2008 - In W. C. P. Org Com (ed.), Proceedings of the XXII World Congress of Philosophy. pp. 110.
    The Seed Thoughts proposed by YU Youngmo and HAM Sukhun may each be summed up by propositions expressed in “People are a May-fly seed” and “Seeds embody the eternal meaning”. They used “seed” to refer to humans or people on the one hand and placed the notion of seed in the holistic context of the Eastern Asian tradition on the other. Then, I seek to connect the anthropological notion and the holistic notion via cheng(誠) or integration. 『The Doctrine of the (...)
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  36.  1
    Why Health and Social Care Support for People with Long-Term Conditions Should Be Oriented Towards Enabling Them to Live Well.Vikki A. Entwistle, Alan Cribb & John Owens - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    There are various reasons why efforts to promote “support for self-management” have rarely delivered the kinds of sustainable improvements in healthcare experiences, health and wellbeing that policy leaders internationally have hoped for. This paper explains how the basis of failure is in some respects built into the ideas that underpin many of these efforts. When support for self-management is narrowly oriented towards educating and motivating patients to adopt the behaviours recommended for disease control, it implicitly reflects and perpetuates limited and (...)
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  37.  21
    Genes, Environment and Responsibility for Violent Behaviour:‘Whatever Genes One has It is Preferable That You Are Prevented From Going Around Stabbing People’.Mairi Levitt - unknown
    For the legal system to function effectively people are generally viewed as autonomous actors able to exercise choice and responsible for their actions. It is conceivable that genetic traits associated with violent and antisocial behaviour could call into question an affected individual’s responsibility for acts of criminal violence. Evidence concerning genes associated with violent and antisocial behaviour has been introduced in criminal courts in USA and Italy, either alone or with associated environmental factors. One example of a ‘genetic defence’ (...)
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  38.  21
    'The Little People': Power and the Worshipable.Aaron Smuts - 2008 - In Lester Hunt & Noel Carroll (eds.), The Twilight Zone and Philosophy. Blackwell.
    Philosophers and social scientists have explored the ritual practices and the experience of worship, but there has been relatively little discussion of what makes something worthy of worship.However, we find a characteristically sophisticated examination of the issue by Rod Serling in the Twilight Zone episode "The Little People" (3rd Season, March 30, 1962). By considering the example of “The Little People” and a few variations, we can clarify the role power plays in making something worthy of worship. The episode (...)
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  39.  7
    The Question of People's Rights in the Provincial Constitutions.Gao Yihan - 1999 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (1):62-63.
    … Talking again about the right to freedom, the situation is the same. That is, the right to freedom is as vulnerable in the face of social inequalities as the right to property, which Gao has just discussed. For example, the constitution stipulates only that "people have freedom of speech and thought." We have to ask whether, in order to enjoy these kinds of freedoms, people do not also need some corresponding life capabilities? [If so], then should society not (...)
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  40.  16
    Pathways to Friendship in the Lives of People with Psychosis: Incorporating Narrative Into Experimental Research.David Stayner, Martha Staeheli & Larry Davidson - 2004 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 35 (2):233-252.
    This paper explores the role of friendship in the lives of people with psychiatric disabilities through the use of narrative. We suggest that the use of phenomenologically based investigation in experimental or other traditional research designs provides a more in-depth and complex view of the lives of people with serious mental illness. We offer the example of the Partnership Project, which provides people with psychiatric disabilities a consumer or non-consumer "partner" with whom to enjoy community activities and spend a (...)
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  41.  9
    Dual Loyalties in Arab American Novel: A Case Study of Scattered Like Seeds by Shaw J. Dallal.Ebrahim Mohammed Alwuraafi - 2013 - Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).
    Dual loyalty refers to the common emotional experience of being pulled in two different directions. It consists of a collective state of mind such that diasporas feel they owe allegiance to both host country and homeland. The study explored the theme of dual loyalties in an Arab American novel, Scattered Like Seeds , by Shaw J. Dallal. The paper used the qualitative research design involving literary criticism. The results showed that dual loyalties can be usual in terms of their occurrence (...)
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  42.  15
    Making Sense of People: Coherence Mechanisms.P. Thagard & Z. Kunda - 1997 - In [Book Chapter].
    When trying to make sense of other people and ourselves, we may rely on several different kinds of cognitive processes. First, we form impressions of other people by integrating information contained in concepts that represent their traits, their behaviors, our stereotypes of the social groups they belong to, and any other information about them that seems relevant. For example, your impression of an acquaintance may be a composite of personality traits (e.g., friendly, independent), behaviors (e.g., told a joke, donated (...)
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  43.  6
    Questioning “Homeland” Through Yael Bartana's Wild Seeds.Helen A. Fielding - 2011 - In Christina Schües, Dorothea Olkowski & Helen Fielding (eds.), Time in Feminist Phenomenology. Indiana University Press. pp. 149.
    Helen Fielding, in examining Yael Bartana’s video art works, in particular, Wild Seeds (2005), argues that politics seem to privilege the temporal, and video art thus lends itself to this enactment. Drawing upon Hannah Arendt, she concludes that the in-between, while a space and not a territory, is more a spacing, a taking place between people “no matter where they happen to be” than a place as such. In Bartana’s works, the temporal aspect of video allows her to open up (...)
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  44.  7
    A Perfect Prosecution: The People of the State of New York Versus Dominique Strauss-Kahn.JaneAnne Murray - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (2):371-390.
    People v. Strauss-Kahn is an ideal lens through which to examine the operation of a criminal justice system that privileges the presumption of guilt, or, to use the words of the US Supreme Court in the 2012 decisions Lafler v. Cooper and Missouri v. Frye, has become “a system of pleas, not a system of trials.” It is both an excellent example of a transparent and objective invocation of the criminal sanction, and a sharp counterpoint to the vast majority (...)
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  45.  13
    Michael Tooley on Possible People and Promising.Helga Kuhse - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):353.
    In Abortion and Infanticide, Michael Tooley argues that it is not wrong to destroy potential persons, such as fetuses and newly born infants. His argument presupposes the following: 1)that the destruction of potential persons is not directly wrong because potential persons do not have a right to life; 2)that destroying a potential person—a fetus or an infant—is morally the same as preventing the existence of an possible person by, for example, using a contraceptive or refraining from, intercourse during a (...)
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  46.  3
    Learning to (Dis)Engage? The Socialising Experiences of Young People Living in Areas of Socio-Economic Disadvantage.Carolynne Mason, Hilary Cremin, Paul Warwick & Tom Harrison - 2011 - British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):421 - 437.
    Young people are increasingly required to demonstrate civic engagement in their communities and help deliver the aspirations of localism and Big Society. Using an ecological systems approach this paper explores the experiences of different groups of young people living in areas of socio-economic disadvantage. Using volunteering as an example of civic engagement it is shown that barriers and motivators for young people stem from within the micro, meso, exo and macrosystems, and that these interact with each other, and with (...)
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  47.  5
    By Gossip and Myths: The Winnipeg Takeover of McKenzie Seeds. [REVIEW]Errol Black - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (10):783 - 787.
    McKenzie Seeds is a crown corporation owned by the people of Manitoba. In 1983, the company was rocked by a scandal involving its senior management. During the course of the controversy, George F. MacDowell resigned as chairman of the McKenzie Seeds board of directors. He subsequently wrote a pamphlet which attempted to provide a context for understanding events at McKenzie Seeds. This paper provides a brief history of the company and a discussion of MacDowell's pamphlet. A postscript provides information on (...)
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  48.  1
    Finding Lists of People on the Web.Latanya Sweeney - 2004 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 34 (1 special issue):1-21.
    Among the vast amounts of personal information published on the World Wide Web (“Web”) and indexed by search engines are lists of names of people. Examples include employees at companies, students enrolled in universities, officers in the military, law enforcement personnel, members of social organizations, and lists of acquaintances. Knowing who works where, attends what, or affiliates with whom provides strategic knowledge to competitors, marketers, and government surveillance efforts. However, finding online rosters of people does not lend itself to keyword (...)
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  49. Patients' Right To Die In Dignity And The Role Of Their Beloved People.Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 1996 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 4.
    The aim of this paper is to ponder the intricate issue of the right to die in dignity by focusing attention on the role of the patient's beloved people. I first provide critical examination of some of the arguments advanced by Ronald Dworkin. I proceed by contemplating relevant scenarios and examining three American court decisions: Saikewicz, Spring and Gray. The first case, Saikewicz, concerns a patient who had no family or other beloved people. I observe that this fact had a (...)
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  50. Political Poetry and the Example of Ernesto Cardenal.Reginald Gibbons - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (3):648-671.
    In Latin America Cardenal is generally regarded as an enduring poet. He brought a recognizably Latin American material into his poetry, and he introduced to Spanish-language poetry in general such poetic techniques as textual collage, free verse lines shaped in Poundian fashion, and, especially, a diction that is concrete and detailed, textured with proper names and the names of things in preference to the accepted poetic language, which was more abstract, general, and vaguely symbolic. But what is notable in Spanish-language (...)
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