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Peter Adamson [155]Peter C. Adamson [1]Peter Scott Adamson [1]
  1.  19
    Don't think for yourself: authority and belief in medieval philosophy.Peter Adamson - 2022 - Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
    How do we judge whether we should be willing to follow the views of experts or whether we ought to try to come to our own, independent views? This book seeks the answer in medieval philosophical thought. In this engaging study into the history of philosophy and epistemology, Peter Adamson provides an answer to a question as relevant today as it was in the medieval period: how and when should we turn to the authoritative expertise of other people in forming (...)
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  2.  41
    The Arabic Plotinus: a philosophical study of the theology of Aristotle.Peter Adamson - 2002 - London: Duckworth.
    The so-called "Theology of Aristotle" is a translation of the Enneads of Plotinus, the most important representative of late ancient Platonism. It was produced in the 9th century CE within the circle of al-Kindī, one of the most important groups for the early reception of Greek thought in Arabic. In part because the "Theology" was erroneously transmitted under Aristotle's authorship, it became the single most important conduit by which Neoplatonism reached the Islamic world. It is referred to by such thinkers (...)
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  3.  71
    Al-Kindī.Peter Adamson - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
  4. The Thought Experimental Method: Avicenna's Flying Man Argument.Peter Adamson & Fedor Benevich - 2018 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 4 (2):147-164.
    No argument from the Arabic philosophical tradition has received more scholarly attention than Avicenna's ‘flying man’ thought experiment, in which a human is created out of thin air and is able to grasp his existence without grasping that he has a body. This paper offers a new interpretation of the version of this thought experiment found at the end of the first chapter of Avicenna's treatment of soul in theHealing. We argue that it needs to be understood in light of (...)
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  5.  61
    The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy.Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers or groups, especially during the 'classical' period from (...)
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  6. Abū Bakr al-Rāzī on Animals.Peter Adamson - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (3):249-273.
    Abū Bakr al-Rāzī (d. 925), a doctor known not only for his medical expertise but also for his notorious philosophical ideas, has not yet been given due credit for his ideas on the ethical treatment of animals. This paper explores the philosophical and theological background of his remarks on animal welfare, arguing that al-Rāzī did not (as has been claimed) see animals as possessing rational, intellectual souls like those of humans. It is also argued that al-Rāzī probably did not, as (...)
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  7.  23
    Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction.Peter Adamson - 2015 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press UK.
    In the history of philosophy, few topics are so relevant to today's cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world. Yet, this remains one of the lesser-known philosophical traditions. In this Very Short Introduction, Peter Adamson explores the history of philosophy among Muslims, Jews, and Christians living in Islamic lands, from its historical background to thinkers in the twentieth century.Introducing the main philosophical themes of the Islamic world, Adamson integrates ideas from the Islamic and Abrahamic faiths to consider (...)
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  8. On knowledge of particulars.Peter Adamson - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):273–294.
    Avicenna's notorious claim that God knows particulars only 'in a universal way' is argued to have its roots in Aristotelian epistemology, and especially in the "Posterior Analytics". According to Avicenna and Aristotle as understood by Avicenna, there is in fact no such thing as 'knowledge' of particulars, at least not as such. Rather, a particular can only be known by subsuming it under a universal. Thus Avicenna turns out to be committed to a much more surprising epistemological thesis: even humans (...)
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  9. Classical Indian philosophy.Peter Adamson - 2020 - Oxford: Oxford University Press. Edited by Jonardon Ganeri.
  10.  15
    Interpreting Avicenna: Critical Essays.Peter Adamson (ed.) - 2013 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Avicenna is the greatest philosopher of the Islamic world. His immense impact on Christian and Jewish medieval thought, as well as on the subsequent Islamic tradition, is charted in this volume alongside studies which provide a comprehensive introduction to and analysis of his philosophy. Contributions from leading scholars address a wide range of topics including Avicenna's life and works, conception of philosophy and achievement in logic and medicine. His ideas in the main areas of philosophy, such as epistemology, philosophy of (...)
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  11.  54
    Al-Kindi.Peter Adamson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
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  12. Al-Kindi and the reception of Greek philosophy.Peter Adamson - 2004 - In Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 32--51.
  13.  13
    Philosophy in the Islamic world.Peter Adamson - 2016 - United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    The latest in the series based on the popular History of Philosophy podcast, this volume presents the first full history of philosophy in the Islamic world for a broad readership. It takes an approach unprecedented among introductions to this subject, by providing full coverage of Jewish and Christian thinkers as well as Muslims, and by taking the story of philosophy from its beginnings in the world of early Islam all the way through to the twentieth century. Major figures like Avicenna, (...)
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  14.  70
    Dialectical Methiod in Alexander of Aphrodisias' Treaties on Fate and Providence.Peter Adamson - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 54.
    This article offers an analysis of the argumentative method of two treatises by Alexander of Aphrodisias, On Fate and On Providence, the latter of which is preserved only in Arabic translation. It is argued that both texts use techniques from Aristotelian dialectic, albeit in different ways, with On Fate adhering to methods outlined in Aristotle's Topics whereas On Providence uses the ‘aporetic’ method familiar from texts such as MetaphysicsΒ‎. This represents a revision of a previous study of Alexander's method in (...)
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  15.  21
    Miskawayh on Animals.Peter Adamson - 2022 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 89 (1):1-24.
    Drawing on all the extant philosophical works of Miskawayh, including his well known Refinement of Character, this paper aims to determine his attitudes towards the psychological capacities and moral standing of non-human animals. Miskawayh most often mentions animals as a contrast to the rationality of humans, but also grants animals likenesses or lesser versions of typically human traits like virtues and friendship. It is argued that for Miskawayh, the teleological design of animals gives humans reasons to show them justice.
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  16. Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds: A History of Philosophy Wthout Any Gaps, Volume 2.Peter Adamson - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Peter Adamson offers an accessible, humorous tour through a period of eight hundred years when some of the most influential of all schools of thought were formed. He introduces us to Cynics and Skeptics, Epicureans and Stoics, emperors and slaves, and traces the development of early Christian philosophy and of ancient science. A major theme of the book is in fact the competition between pagan and Christian philosophy in this period, and the Jewish tradition appears in the shape of Philo (...)
     
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  17.  49
    The Philosophical Works of Al-Kindi.Peter E. Pormann & Peter Adamson (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford: Oup Pakistan.
    Al-Kindī, honoured as the 'philosopher of the Arabs', was the first philosopher of Islam. His pioneer philosophical writings engage with ideas that became available through the Graeco-Arabic translation movement. This volume makes his entire philosophical output-some two dozen works-available in English, most of them for the first time. An overall introduction, introductions to each work and extensive notes explain al-Kindī's ideas, sources, and influence.
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  18.  53
    Fakhr al-dīn al-rāzī on place.Peter Adamson - 2017 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 27 (2):205-236.
    The twelfth century philosopher-theologian Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī is well known for his critique of Avicennan metaphysics. In this paper, I examine his critique of Avicenna's physics, and in particular his rejection of the Avicennan and Aristotelian theory of place as the inner boundary of a containing body. Instead, Fakhr al-Dīn defends a definition of place as self-subsisting extension, an idea explicitly rejected by Aristotle and Avicenna after him. Especially in his late work, theMaṭālib, Fakhr al-Dīn explores a number of important (...)
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  19. The Arabic Sea Battle: al-Fārābī on the Problem of Future Contingents.Peter Adamson - 2006 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (2):163-188.
    Ancient commentators like Ammonius and Boethius tried to solve Aristotle's “sea battle argument” in On Interpretation 9 by saying that statements about future contingents are “indefinitely” true or false. They were followed by al-Fārābī in his commentary on On Interpretation. The article sets out two possible interpretations of what “indefinitely” means here, and shows that al-Fārābī actually has both conceptions: one applied in his interpretation of Aristotle, and another that he is forced into by the problem of divine foreknowledge. It (...)
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  20. Vision, light and color in al-Kindi, ptolemy and the ancient commentators.Peter Adamson - 2006 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):207-236.
    Al-Kindi was influenced by two Greek traditions in his attempts to explain vision, light and color. Most obviously, his works on optics are indebted to Euclid and, perhaps indirectly, to Ptolemy. But he also knew some works from the Aristotelian tradition that touch on the nature of color and vision. Al-Kindi explicitly rejects the Aristotelian account of vision in his De Aspectibus, and adopts a theory according to which we see by means of a visual ray emitted from the eye. (...)
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  21.  20
    Ibn Khaldūn's Method of History and Aristotelian Natural Philosophy.Peter Adamson - 2024 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 62 (2):195-210.
    The historian Ibn Khaldūn (d. 1406) is most often treated by historians of philosophy as part of the story of political philosophy in the Islamic world. While this is perfectly legitimate, it may be misleading when it comes to the question of the method he proposes for the historian. This paper argues that that method is in fact based on a different branch of (Aristotelian) science: natural philosophy. After rendering this proposition initially plausible by noting frequent references to "nature" in (...)
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  22.  4
    Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds.Peter Adamson - 2015 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Peter Adamson offers an accessible, humorous tour through a period of eight hundred years when some of the most influential of all schools of thought were formed: from the third century BC to the sixth century AD. He introduces us to Cynics and Skeptics, Epicureans and Stoics, emperors and slaves, and traces the development of Christian and Jewish philosophy and of ancient science. Chapters are devoted to such major figures as Epicurus, Lucretius, Cicero, Seneca, Plotinus, and Augustine. But in keeping (...)
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  23.  32
    Philosophy and Jurisprudence in the Islamic World.Peter Adamson (ed.) - 2019 - Boston: De Gruyter.
    This book brings together the study of two great disciplines of the Islamic world: law and philosophy. In both sunni and shiite Islam, it became the norm for scholars to acquire a high level of expertise in the legal tradition. Thus some of the greatest names in the history of Aristotelianism were trained jurists, like Averroes, or commented on the status and nature of law, like al-Fārābī. While such authors sought to put law in its place relative to the philosophical (...)
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  24.  29
    Arabic Philosophy and Theology before Avicenna.Peter Adamson - 2011 - In John Marenbon (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Medieval Philosophy. Oxford Up. pp. 58.
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  25.  24
    Philosophy in the Islamic world, volume 2/1: 11th-12th centuries: Central and Eastern regions.Ulrich Rudolph & Peter Adamson - unknown
    Philosophy in the Islamic world is a comprehensive and unprecedented four-volume reference work devoted to the history of philosophy in the realms of Islam, from its beginnings in the eighth century AD down to modern times. In the period covered by this second volume (eleventh and twelfth centuries). Both major and minor figures of the period are covered, giving details of biography and doctrine, as well as detailed lists and summaries of each author’s works. This is the English version of (...)
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  26.  78
    Neoplatonism: The Last Ten Years.Peter Adamson - 2015 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (2):205-220.
  27. The Arabic tradition.Peter Adamson - 2010 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. New York: Routledge.
  28.  59
    I—Memory from Plato to Damascius.Peter Adamson - 2019 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 93 (1):161-184.
    Taking its cue from a passage in which the late pagan Neoplatonist Damascius criticizes his predecessor Proclus, this paper explores the way that ancient philosophers understood the soul’s access to its own tacit contents through the power of memory. Late ancient discussions of this issue respond to a range of passages in Plato and to Aristotle’s On Memory. After a survey of this material it is shown that for Damascius, but not Proclus, memory requires a distinction between the subject and (...)
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  29.  15
    Medieval Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 4.Peter Adamson - 2018 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Adamsom offers a lively and accessible tour through 600 years of intellectual history, offering a feast of new ideas in every area of philosophy. He introduces us to some of the greatest thinkers of the Western tradition including Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, Hildegard of Bingen, and Julian of Norwich.
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  30.  23
    Animals: A History (Oxford Philosophical Concepts).Peter Adamson & G. Fay Edwards (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This volume traces the history of animals in philosophy, from antiquity down to contemporary times. Negative attitudes towards animals, as found in Aristotle and Descartes, turn out to be more nuanced than usually supposed, while remarkable discussions of animal welfare appear in late antiquity, India, the Islamic world, and Kant.
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  31. Knowledge of Universals and Particulars in the Baghdad School.Peter Adamson - 2007 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 18:141-164.
    L'analisi dell'aristotelismo «platonizzante» nell'ambito della filosofia araba prima della sistemazione della Shifa di Avicenna, secondo cui Dio non avrebbe conoscenza dei particolari, consente all'A. di dimostrare come ci siano stati anche approcci platonici ad Aristotele , che non sono passati attraverso il filtro dei neoplatonici greci. L'altra cosa significativa è il fatto che all'interno della scuola di Baghdad vi sono modi diversi di intendere lo stato ontologico degli universali. L'A. tenta anche di ridimensionare la figura di al-Farabi all'interno della scuola (...)
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  32.  92
    The simplicity of self-knowledge after Avicenna.Peter Adamson - 2018 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 28 (2):257-277.
    Alongside his much-discussed theory that humans are permanently, if only tacitly, self-aware, Avicenna proposed that in actively conscious self-knowers the subject and object of thought are identical. He applies to both humans and God the slogan that the self-knower is “intellect, intellecting, and object of intellection (‘aql, ‘āqil, ma‘qūl)”. This paper examines reactions to this idea in the Islamic East from the 12th-13th centuries. A wide range of philosophers such as Abū l-Barakāt al-Baghdādī, Faḫr al-Dīn al-Rāzī, al-Šahrastānī, Šaraf al-Dīn al-Mas‘ūdī, (...)
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  33.  17
    Yaḥyā Ibn ʿAdī on the Location of God.Peter Adamson & Robert Wisnovsky - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1 (1).
    This piece offers an edition, translation, and analysis of a newly discovered text by Yaḥyā Ibn ʿAdī, a leading Aristotelian of the Baghdad school in the tenth century. It briefly discusses what Aristotle meant, at the end of the Physics, by saying that the Prime Mover is “in” the outermost heaven. Ibn ʿAdī argues, in part through an exhaustive discussion of the senses of the word “in,” that God is in the sphere only in the sense that an object of (...)
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  34.  7
    Thinking with Rosa: assent in philosophy of the Islamic world.Peter Adamson - 2024 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 32 (3):647-665.
    In Thinking with Assent: Renewing a Traditional Account of Knowledge and Belief, Maria Rosa Antognazza offers a historical narrative of pre-modern epistemology. She argues that until very recently, philosophers generally held that “knowing and believing are distinct in kind in the strong sense that they are mutually exclusive mental states”. This paper tests, and ultimately confirms, that account by applying it two thinkers of the Islamic world, al-Fārābī (d.950 CE) and Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna, d.1037 CE). It is shown that both (...)
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  35.  32
    Indian Animal Ethics.Peter Adamson - 2023 - Think 22 (63):47-52.
    Ancient India is famous as a home for the ethical concept of ahimsa, meaning ‘non-violence’. Among other things, this moral principle demanded avoiding cruelty towards animals and led to the widespread adoption of vegetarianism. In this article, it is argued that the reasoning which led the ancient Indians to avoid violence towards animals might actually provide a more powerful rationale for vegetarianism than the utilitarian rationale that is more prevalent among animal rights activists nowadays.
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  36.  54
    Al-kindī and the mu‘tazila: Divine attributes, creation and freedom: Peter Adamson.Peter Adamson - 2003 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):45-77.
    The paper discusses al-Kindī's response to doctrines held by contemporary theologians of the Mu‘tazilite school: divine attributes, creation, and freedom. In the first section it is argued that, despite his broadly negative theology, al-Kindī recognizes a special kind of “essential” positive attribute belonging to God. The second section argues that al-Kindī agreed with the Mu‘tazila in holding that something may not yet exist but still be an object of God's knowledge and power. Also it presents a new parallel between al-Kindī (...)
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  37.  23
    Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life.Peter Adamson - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):363-366.
  38. Yahyá ibn 'Adi and Averroes on «Metaphysics» Alpha Elatton'.Peter Adamson - 2010 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 21:343-374.
    L'A. confronta due commenti su quello che nel mondo arabo viene considerato il primo libro della Metaphysica di Aristotele: alpha Elatton. Dopo averne delineato i contenuti e la penetrazione nel mondo arabo grazie alle traduzioni di Ustat e Ishaq ibn Hunayn, l'A. esamina due importanti commenti a quest'opera: Yahyá Ibn 'Adi, un commentatore cristiano della scuola di Baghdad e Averroè . I due autori leggono il testo in modo molto diverso: questo suggerisce una grande differenza tra Averroè e la scuola (...)
     
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  39.  13
    Yaḥyā Ibn ʿAdī on a Kalām Argument for Creation.Peter Adamson & Robert Wisnovsky - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 5 (1).
    This article offers an analysis, translation, and edition of a brief, recently uncovered Arabic text by the tenth-century CE Christian Aristotelian thinker Yaḥyā ibn ʿAdī. Ibn ʿAdī here takes issue with an argument for the existence of God, widely used in kalām. According to this argument, bodies cannot exist without being either in motion or at rest; motion and rest must begin; therefore all bodies and hence the universe as a whole must have begun. Ibn ʿAdī diagnoses various flaws in (...)
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  40.  17
    In the age of al-Fārābī: Arabic philosophy in the fourth-tenth century.Peter Adamson (ed.) - 2008 - Turin: Nino Aragno.
    Contains papers that cover a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2006 to consider the philosophy of al-Farabi alongside other intellectual developments of his time, together with a wide range of other figures and traditions from the period.
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  41. Philosophy in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 3.Peter Adamson - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Peter Adamson presents the first full history of philosophy in the Islamic world for a broad readership. He traces its development from early Islam to the 20th century, ranging from Spain to South Asia, featuring Jewish and Christian thinkers as well as Muslim. Major figures like Avicenna, Averroes, and Maimonides are covered in great detail, but the book also looks at less familiar thinkers, including women philosophers. Attention is also given to the philosophical relevance of Islamic theology and mysticism--the Sufi (...)
     
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  42.  5
    The Necessity and Goodness of Animals in Sijistānī’s Kashf Al-Maḥjūb.Peter Adamson & Hanif Amin Beidokhti - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (3):72.
    The Neoplatonic notion of “emanation” implies a required progression through hierarchical stages, originating from the highest principle (the One or God) and cascading down through a series of principles. While this process is deemed necessary, it is also inherently good, even “choiceworthy”, aligning with the identification of the first principle with the Good. Plotinus, a prominent Neoplatonist, emphasizes the beauty and goodness of the sensible world, governed by divine providence. This perspective, transmitted through Arabic adaptations of Plotinus, influences Islamic philosophers (...)
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  43. Plotinus on Astrology.Peter Adamson - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 35:265-91.
     
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  44. The Heavens.Peter Adamson - 2007 - In Al-Kindī. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter shows how al-Kindī interweaves ideas from Greek cosmology to give a theory that can explain the efficacy of astrology and how God’s providence is dispersed by means of heavenly influence. A concrete example is found in al-Kindī’s works on meteorology, since he thinks that weather is produced by celestial causation. The mechanics of this causation are explained differently in different works, which leads to a consideration of the authenticity of On Rays, which is ascribed to al-Kindī, and its (...)
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  45. Before essence and existence: Al-kindi's conception of being.Peter Adamson - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):297-312.
    This paper studies the first metaphysical theory in Arabic philosophy, that of al-Kindi, as found in "On First Philosophy" and other of his works. Placing these works against the background of translations produced in al-Kindi's circle (the "Theology of Aristotle," which is the Arabic version of Plotinus, and the "Liber de Causis," the Arabic version of Proclus' "Elements of Theology"), it argues that al-Kindi has two conceptions of being: "simple" being, which excludes predication and derives from Neoplatonism, and "complex" being, (...)
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  46.  23
    Faḫr al-Dīn al-Rāzī on Animal Cognition and Immortality.Peter Adamson & Bethany Somma - 2024 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 106 (1):23-52.
    This paper is devoted to a fascinating passage in Faḫr al-Dīn al-Rāzī (d. 1210), in which he argues that non-human animals have rational souls. It is found in his Mulaḫḫaṣ fī l-manṭiq wa-l-ḥikma (Epitome on Philosophy and Logic). Following a discussion of the afterlife, Faḫr al-Dīn suggests that animals should, like humans, be capable of grasping universals, and that they are aware of their own identity over time. Furthermore, animal behavior shows that they are capable of rational planning and problem-solving. (...)
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  47.  97
    Classical Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 1.Peter Adamson - 2014 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    In 43 lively chapters Peter Adamson tells the story of philosophy from its beginnings to Plato and Aristotle. Most histories jump from one famous name to another, but Adamson shows that the people and ideas in between, usually overlooked, are fascinating and significant. Based on his popular podcasts, this is serious history with a light touch.
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  48.  10
    Studies on Plotinus and al-Kindī.Peter Adamson - 2014 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate/Variorum.
    This book collects papers on the greatest philosopher of late antiquity and founder of Neoplatonism, Plotinus (d. 270), and the founding figure of philosophy in the Islamic world: al-Kindī (d. ca. 873). A number of the contributions focus on the text that joins the two: the Theology of Aristotle, in fact an Arabic version of Plotinus' Enneads produced in al-Kindī's translation circle. Adamson argues that this translation is best understood as a reinterpretation of Plotinus designed to appeal to contemporary readers (...)
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  49. Freedom, providence and fate.Peter Adamson - 2014 - In Svetla Slaveva-Griffin & Pauliina Remes (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Neoplatonism. New York: Routledge.
     
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  50.  99
    Aristotelianism and the Soul in the Arabic Plotinus.Peter Adamson - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):211-232.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Ideas 62.2 (2001) 211-232 [Access article in PDF] Aristotelianism and the Soul in the Arabic Plotinus Peter Adamson It is common for historians of medieval thought to note that the influence of Aristotle on Islamic philosophy was tinged with Neoplatonism, thanks to a text known as the "Theology of Aristotle." It is now known that the "Theology" is in fact not a work of (...)
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