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Peter Alward [50]Peter Wallace Brannen Alward [1]
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Peter Alward
University of Saskatchewan
  1.  36
    Correspondence Via the Backdoor and Other Stories.Peter Alward - 2003 - Disputatio 14:3-21.
    Much has been written of late concerning the relative virtues and views of correspondence and deflationary theories of Truth. What is troubling, however, is that it is not always entirely clear exactly what distinguishes different conceptions of truth. Characterizations of the distinction are often vague and sometimes vary from writer to writer. One central thing I want to do here is to diagnose the source of the difficulty in providing a clear characterization of the distinction. In light of this diagnosis, (...)
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  2. A Neo-Hintikkan Theory of Attitude Ascriptions.Peter Alward - 2005 - Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):1-11.
    In the paper, I develop what I call the “Neo-Hintikkan theory” of belief sentences. What is characteristic of this approach is that the meaning of an ascription is analyzed in terms of the believer’s “epistemic alternatives”: the set of worlds compatible with how the believer takes the world to be. The Neo-Hintikkan approach proceeds by assuming that individuals in believers’ alternatives can share spatio-temporal parts with actual individuals, and ascribers can refer to individuals in believer’s alternatives in virtue of their (...)
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  3. Truth in Fiction.Peter Alward - manuscript
     
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  4. That’s the Fictional Truth, Ruth.Peter Alward - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (3):347-363.
    Fictional truth is commonly analyzed in terms of the speech acts or propositional attitudes of a teller. In this paper, I investigate Lewis’s counterfactual analysis in terms of felicitous narrator assertion, Currie’s analysis in terms of fictional author belief, and Byrne’s analysis in terms of ideal author invitations to make-believe—and find them all lacking. I propose instead an analysis in terms of the revelations of an infelicitous narrator.
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  5.  95
    Leave Me Out of It: De Re, but Not de Se, Imaginative Engagement with Fiction.Peter Alward - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):451–459.
    I have been dissatisfied with Walton’s make-believe model of appreciator engagement with fiction ever since my first encounter with it as a graduate student.1 What I have always objected to is not the suggestion that such engagement is broadly speaking imaginative; rather, it is the suggestion that it specifically involves de se imaginative activity on the part of appreciators. That is, while I concede that appreciators imagine (de re) of the fictional works they experience that they are thus and so, (...)
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  6. Mad, Martian, but Not Mad Martian Pain.Peter Alward - 2004 - Sorites 15 (December):73-75.
    Functionalism cannot accommodate the possibility of mad pain—pain whose causes and effects diverge from those of the pain causal role. This is because what it is to be in pain according to functionalism is simply to be in a state that occupies the pain role. And the identity theory cannot accommodate the possibility of Martian pain—pain whose physical realization is foot-cavity inflation rather than C-fibre activation (or whatever physiological state occupies the pain-role in normal humans). After all, what it is (...)
     
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  7. Mopes, Dopes, and Tropes: A Critique of the Trope Solution to the Problem of Mental Causation.Peter Alward - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (1):53-.
    ABSTRACT: A popular strategylor resolving Kim 's exclusion problem is to suggest that mental and physical property tropes are identical despite the non-identity of the mental and physical properties themselves. I argue that mental and physical tropes can be identified without losing the dispositional character of mentality only if a dual-character hypothesis regarding the intrinsic characters of tropes is endorsed. But even with this assumption, the causaI efficacy of the wrong dispositions is secured.RÉSUMÉ: On résout habituellement le problème de l'exclusion (...)
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  8. Is Phenomenal Pain the Primary Intension of 'Pain'?Peter Alward - 2004 - Metaphysica 5 (1):15-28.
    two-dimensional modal framework introduced by Evans [2] and developed by Davies and Humberstone. [3] This framework provides Chalmers with a powerful tool for handling the most serious objection to conceivability arguments for dualism: the problem of..
     
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  9. Comments on Mark Kalderon's “The Open Question Argument, Frege's Puzzle, and Leibniz's Law”.Peter Alward - unknown
    A standard strategy for defending a claim of non-identity is one which invokes Leibniz’s Law. (1) Fa (2) ~Fb (3) (∀x)(∀y)(x=y ⊃ (∀P)(Px ⊃ Py)) (4) a=b ⊃ (Fa ⊃ Fb) (5) a≠b In Kalderon’s view, this basic strategy underlies both Moore’s Open Question Argument (OQA) as well as (a variant formulation of) Frege’s puzzle (FP). In the former case, the argument runs from the fact that some natural property—call it “F-ness”—has, but goodness lacks, the (2nd order) property of its (...)
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  10.  8
    Simple and Sophisticated “Naive” Semantics.Peter Alward - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):101-.
  11. The Inessential Quasi-Indexical.Peter Alward - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (2):235 - 255.
    In this paper, I argue, contra Perry, that the existence of locating beliefs does not require the abandonment of the analysis of belief as a relation between subjects and propositions. I argue that what the "problem of the essential indexical" reveals is that a complete explanation of behaviour requires both an explanation of the type of behaviour the agent engaged in and an explanation of why she engaged in it in the circumstances that she did. And I develop an account (...)
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  12.  48
    Onstage Illocution.Peter Alward - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):321 - 331.
    performances. But comparatively little work has been by way of elucidating such speech acts,[1] and without an adequate account of them, such comparisons will ultimately prove to be empty. In this paper, I will defend an illocutionary pretense view, according to which actors pretend to perform various kinds of illocutionary acts rather than genuinely performing them. This is, of course, a fairly intuitive position to take. What I want to argue, however, is that this is the route one must take: (...)
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  13.  35
    Cluster Theory: Resurrection.Peter Alward - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (2):269.
    ABSTRACT: The cluster theory of names is generally thought to have been to have been utterly discredited by the objections raised against it by Kripke in Naming and Necessity. In this paper, I develop a new version of the cluster theory in which the role played by clusters of associated descriptions is occupied by teams of cognitive relations. And I argue that these teams of relations find a home in an account of the meanings of expressions in epistemic sentence frames, (...)
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  14.  91
    Description, Disagreement, and Fictional Names.Peter Alward - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):423-448.
    In this paper, a theory of the contents of fictional names — names of fictional people, places, etc. — will be developed.1 The fundamental datum that must be addressed by such a theory is that fictional names are, in an important sense, empty: the entities to which they putatively refer do not exist.2 Nevertheless, they make substantial contributions to the truth conditions of sentences in which they occur. Not only do such sentences have truth conditions, sentences differing only in the (...)
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  15. Ignorance and Abortion Policy.Peter Alward - manuscript
     
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  16.  92
    Word-Sculpture, Speech Acts, and Fictionality.Peter Alward - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):389-399.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
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  17.  4
    Cliffhangers and Sequels: Stories, Serials, and Authorial Intentions.Peter Alward - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (1):163-172.
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  18.  36
    Between the Lines of Age: Reflections on the Metaphysics of Words.Peter Alward - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):172–187.
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  19.  31
    The Spoken Work.Peter Alward - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (4):331-337.
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  20.  11
    For the Ubiquity of Nonactual Fact-Telling Narrators.Peter Alward - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):401–404.
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  21.  5
    6. A Neo-Hintikkan Solution to Kripke’s Puzzle.Peter Alward - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of Reason: Essays in Honour of John Woods. University of Toronto Press. pp. 93-108.
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  22.  8
    Fregecide.Peter Alward - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (2):275.
  23. Making Mind Matter More or Less.Peter Alward - manuscript
    There comes a time in every young philosopher.
     
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  24. Leave Me Out of It: De Re, But Not De Se, Imaginative Engagement with Fiction.Peter Alward - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):451-459.
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  25.  61
    Review of D. M. Armstrong, Truth and Truthmakers. [REVIEW]Peter Alward - 2004 - Disputatio 1 (17):74-78.
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  26.  64
    Ignorance, Indeterminacy, and Abortion Policy.Peter Alward - 2007 - Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (2-4):183-200.
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  27.  42
    Transparent Representation: Photography and the Art of Casting.Peter Alward - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):9-18.
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  28.  60
    Are Functional Properties Causally Potent?Peter Alward - 2006 - Sorites 17:49-55.
    Kim has defended a solution to the exclusion problem which deploys the «causal inheritance principle» and the identification of instantiations of mental properties with instantiations of their realizing physical properties. I wish to argue that Kim's putative solution to the exclusion problem rests on an equivocation between instantiations of properties as bearers of properties and instantiations as property instances. On the former understanding, the causal inheritance principle is too weak to confer causal efficacy upon mental properties. And on the latter (...)
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  29.  33
    COMMENTARY: “Second-Order Predication and the Metaphysics of Properties” by Andrew Egan.Peter Alward - unknown
    Egan argues against Lewis’s view that properties are sets of actual and possible individuals and in favour of the view that they are functions from worlds to extensions (sets of individuals). Egan argues that Lewis’s view implies that 2nd order properties are never possessed contingently by their (1st order) bearers, an implication to which there are numerous counter-examples. And Egan argues that his account of properties is more commensurable with the role they play as the semantic values of predicates than (...)
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  30. Reading, Writing, and Speech Act Theory: Prolegomena to Any Future Logic of Fiction.Peter Alward - unknown
    meaning of a proper name is simply its referent.[1] This thesis, however, brings with it a whole host of problems. One particularly thorny difficulty is that of negative existentials, sentences of the form ‘N does not exist’ (where ‘N’ is a proper name). Intuitively, some such sentences are true, but the direct reference theory seems to imply that they must be either false or meaningless. After all, if the meaning of a name is just its referent, then a sentence such (...)
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  31.  41
    Fiona Cowie, What's Within? Nativism Reconsidered, Philosophy of Mind Series.Peter Alward - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (3):448-451.
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  32. For the Ubiquity.Peter Alward - manuscript
    Kania[1] has recently developed an argument which poses a serious challenge to the “ubiquity thesis†– the view that every literary narrative[2] necessarily has a fictional narrator.[3] Kania characterizes a fictional narrator as a (possibly non-human) agent who tells (or is responsible for) the narrative and who exists on “the same..
     
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  33. Comments on Patrick McGivern's “Parts of Properties: Realization as Decomposition”.Peter Alward - unknown
    My main reaction to MCGivern’s paper was one of dialectical puzzlement. Block argues that, Macro Non-Reduction: [all] macro properties are irreducible to the micro properties on which they supervene..
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  34.  9
    Identity Statements and Conversationally Salient Content.Peter Alward - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (1):121-138.
    In this paper, I argue that viewing Frege’s puzzle through a semantic lens results in the rejection of solutions to it on irrelevant grounds. As a result, I develop a solution to it that rests on a non-semantic sense of context-sensitivity. And I apply this picture to Frege’s puzzle when it arises through the use of identity statements designed to establish that distinct speakers are talking about the same thing.
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  35. Comments on Heidi Tiedke’s €Œis Knowledge Ever Constitutive of Freedom?€.Peter Alward - unknown
               According to Tiedke, in order for an act to be free it must satisfy two requirements: (PR) The agent must have been the source of the action. (PAP) It must have been possible for the agent to have done otherwise. Different accounts of freedom cash these conditions out in different ways. The Standard Compatibilist offers the following versions of these principles: (PRSC) The agent’s choice was a link in the (...)
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  36.  1
    Simple and Sophisticated "Naive" Semantics.Peter Alward - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):101-122.
  37.  21
    Varieties of Believed-World Semantics.Peter Alward - 2005 - Philosophia 32 (1-4):51-72.
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  38. Commentary on “A Meinongian View of Definite Descriptions”.Peter Alward - unknown
    My original reaction to Yosh’s paper was to grumble. It seemed to me to contain a number of terminological infelicities, unpersuasive arguments, and counterintuitive implications. And while I think that some of my superficial complaints are worth pointing out (and I can’t help myself), a commentary consisting only of grumbling would be neither interesting nor helpful. Paul Viminitz would describe such a commentary as “unseemly”. And so I revisited Yosh’s paper with a more sympathetic eye. My second reaction was to (...)
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  39. Comments on David Johnston’s €œIdentity, Necessity, and Propositionsâ€.Peter Alward - unknown
               Johnston maintains that the notion of a proposition—a language independent (abstract) particular—can be dispensed with in philosophical semantics and replaced with that of a propositional act. A propositional act is a component of a speech act that is responsible for the propositional content of the speech act. Traditionally, it is thought that a propositional act yields the propositional content of a speech act by being an act of expressing a (...)
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  40. Comments on “Individuating Lexical Types And.Peter Alward - manuscript
    In this commentary, I am going to focus on the earlier sections of Lapointe’s paper in which she defends an interpretation of Frege’s account of the individuation of lexical types. According to Lapointe, Frege rejects the view that two signs – concrete particulars – belong to the same lexical type just in case they are tokens of the same orthographic or phonographic type. Instead Frege’s position is that two signs belong to the same lexical type “only if they are recognized (...)
     
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  41.  6
    Butter Knives and Screwdrivers: An Intentionalist Defense of Radical Constructivism.Peter Alward - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):247-260.
    Robert Stecker has posed a dilemma for the constructivist theory of interpretation: either interpretations consist of statements with truth values or they do not. Stecker argues that either way, they cannot change the meaning of an artwork. In this article, I argue contra Stecker that if interpretations consist of meaning declarations rather than statements, they can change the meanings of the objects toward which they are directed, where whether they so consist is largely a function of the interpreter's intentions. Hence, (...)
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  42.  2
    Mopes, Dopes, and Tropes: A Critique of the Trope Solution to the Problem of Mental Causation: Dialogue.Peter Alward - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (1):53-64.
    ABSTRACT A popular strategy for resolving Kim's exclusion problem is to suggest that mental and physical property tropes are identical despite the non-identity of the mental and physical properties themselves. I argue that mental and physical tropes can be identified without losing the dispositional character of mentality only if a dual-character hypothesis regarding the intrinsic characters of tropes is endorsed. But even with this assumption, the causal efficacy of the wrong dispositions is secured.
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  43. Mario De Caro and David Macarthur, Eds., Naturalism in Question Reviewed By.Peter Alward - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25 (2):101-104.
     
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  44. Chapter Four: Truncated Story-Listening.Peter Alward - manuscript
    In this chapter, a positive account of reader engagement with fiction will developed. According to this picture, the basic reader attitude towards fictional works is imaginative. But, in my view, engagement with fiction does not require any de se imagining on the part of readers; it requires only de dicto and de re imagining. The account of reader engagement is modelled on the attitudes of story-listeners to the stories to which they listen and the performers who tell them. In engaged (...)
     
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  45. For the Ubiquity.Peter Alward - manuscript
    Kania[1] has recently developed an argument which poses a serious challenge to the “ubiquity thesis†– the view that every literary narrative[2] necessarily has a fictional narrator.[3] Kania characterizes a fictional narrator as a (possibly non-human) agent who tells (or is responsible for) the narrative and who exists on “the same..
     
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  46.  4
    The Parliamentarian's Reply.Peter Alward - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (3):665.
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  47. Correspondence on the Cheap.Peter Alward - 1996 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (3):163-178.
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  48. Empty Revelations: An Essay on Talk About, and Attitudes Toward, Fiction.Peter Alward - 2012 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    What mysteries lie at the heart of fiction's power to enchant and engage the mind? Empty Revelations considers a number of philosophical problems that fiction raises, including the primary issue of how we can think and talk about things that do not exist. Peter Alward covers thought-provoking terrain, exploring fictional truth, the experience of being "caught up" in a story, and the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction. At the centre of Alward's argument is a figure known as the "narrative informant" (...)
     
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  49. Mario De Caro and David Macarthur, Eds., Naturalism in Question. [REVIEW]Peter Alward - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25:101-104.
     
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  50. Philosophical Problems: An Introductory Text in Philosophy.Peter Alward - 2017 - Broadview Press.
    Peter Alward’s rigorous introductory text functions as a roadmap for students, laying out the key issues, positions, and arguments of academic philosophy. The book covers central topics in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy. An introductory chapter presents the foundations of philosophical discourse and offers a primer on the basics of logic. Those argumentative tools are then employed to address classic philosophical issues such as the relationship between body and mind, skepticism, the possibility of free will, and the existence of (...)
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