Results for 'Peter B. Jones'

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  1.  19
    Monoamine Oxidase A Gene and Personality Traits From Late Adolescence Through Early Adulthood: A Latent Variable Investigation.Man K. Xu, Darya Gaysina, Roula Tsonaka, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Tim J. Croudace, Jennifer H. Barnett, Jeanine Houwing-Duistermaat, Marcus Richards & Peter B. Jones - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  2.  23
    Peter V. Jones : Homer, Odyssey I and II, Translation, Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Vi+153. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1991. £24. [REVIEW]R. B. Rutherford - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):425-425.
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  3.  17
    The MindfulBreather: Motion Guided Mindfulness.Tom B. Mole, Julieta Galante, Iona C. Walker, Anna F. Dawson, Laura A. Hannah, Pieter Mackeith, Mark Ainslie & Peter B. Jones - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  4.  3
    Constructing Identifiable Composite Faces: The Importance of Cognitive Alignment of Interview and Construction Procedure.Faye C. Skelton, Charlie D. Frowd, Peter J. B. Hancock, Helen S. Jones, Benedict C. Jones, Cristina Fodarella, Kirsty Battersby & Karen Logan - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 26 (3):507-521.
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  5.  23
    Adaptation to Antifaces and the Perception of Correct Famous Identity in an Average Face.Anthony C. Little, Peter J. B. Hancock, Lisa M. DeBruine & Benedict C. Jones - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  6. Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz - 2003 - Cognition 87:237-239.
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  7.  11
    Honeybees, Communicative Order, and the Collapse of Ecosystems.Peter Harries-Jones - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (2):193-204.
    The paper examines the sudden disappearance in the United States of millions of honeybees in managed bee colonies. The major research undertaken in the U.S. concentrates on finding the pathogens responsible. This paper suggests an alternative avenue of research a) that as a result of global warming there is a disjunction between bees pollinating cycles and the life cycle of plants b) that understanding changes in “timing cycles” as a result of global warming is the key to understanding the disappearance (...)
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  8.  17
    Dewey's Democracy and Education Revisited: Contemporary Discourses for Democratic Education and Leadership.Clay Baulch, Nichole E. Bourgeois, Peter Hlebowitsh, Raymond A. Horn, Karen Embry-Jenlink, Patrick M. Jenlink, Timothy B. Jones, Andrew Kaplan, Jarod Lambert, John Leonard, Reitumetse Obakeng Mabokela, Jean A. Madsen, Kathy Sernak, Robert J. Starratt, Lee Stewart, Duncan Waite & Susan Field Waite (eds.) - 2009 - R&L Education.
    This book presents a collection of contemporary discourses that reconsider the relationship of democracy as a political ideology and American ideal and education as the foundation of preparing democratic citizens in America.
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  9.  28
    Homeric Hiatus Pierre Fortassier: L'Hiatus expressif dans l'Iliade et dans l'Odyssée. (Bibliothèque et l'Information grammaticale, 17.) Pp. 390. Paris: Peeters, 1989. B. frs. 1,950. [REVIEW]Peter Jones - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):10-11.
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  10.  13
    Anita Burdman Feferman. Politics, Logic, and Love. The Life of Jean van Heijenoort. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Boston and London, and A K Peters, Wellesley, Mass., 1993, Xv + 415 Pp. - Solomon Feferman. Jean van Heijenoort's Scholarly Work, 1948–1986. Therein, Pp. 371–390. [REVIEW]H. B. Enderton - 1993 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (4):1465-1466.
  11.  72
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Werner Menski, Carl Olson, William Cenkner, Anne E. Monius, Sarah Hodges, Jeffrey J. Kripal, Carol Salomon, Deepak Sarma, William Cenkner, John E. Cort, Peter A. Huff, Joseph A. Bracken, Larry D. Shinn, Jonathan S. Walters, Ellison Banks Findly, John Grimes, Loriliai Biernacki, David L. Gosling, Thomas Forsthoefel, Michael H. Fisher, Ian Barrow, Srimati Basu, Natalie Gummer, Pradip Bhattacharya, John Grimes, Heather T. Frazer, Elaine Craddock, Andrea Pinkney, Joseph Schaller, Michael W. Myers, Lise F. Vail, Wayne Howard, Bradley B. Burroughs, Shalva Weil, Joseph A. Bracken, Christopher W. Gowans, Dan Cozort, Katherine Janiec Jones, Carl Olson, M. D. McLean, A. Whitney Sanford, Sarah Lamb, Eliza F. Kent, Ashley Dawson, Amir Hussain, John Powers, Jennifer B. Saunders & Ramdas Lamb - 2005 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):153-228.
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  12.  26
    New Books. [REVIEW]P. F. Strawson, W. B. Gallie, Geoffrey Hunter, C. D. Rollins, Peter Winch, J. M. Hinton, W. H. Walsh, J. H. S. Armstrong & O. R. Jones - 1960 - Mind 69 (275):416-432.
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  13. I Ought, Therefore I Can.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (2):167-216.
    I defend the following version of the ought-implies-can principle: (OIC) by virtue of conceptual necessity, an agent at a given time has an (objective, pro tanto) obligation to do only what the agent at that time has the ability and opportunity to do. In short, obligations correspond to ability plus opportunity. My argument has three premises: (1) obligations correspond to reasons for action; (2) reasons for action correspond to potential actions; (3) potential actions correspond to ability plus opportunity. In the (...)
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  14.  22
    The Medical Writings of Anonymus Londinensis. By W. H. S. Jones. Pp. Viii + 168. Cambridge: University Press, 1947. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW]B. Farrington & W. H. S. Jones - 1948 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 68:163-164.
  15. The Indeterminacy Paradox: Character Evaluations and Human Psychology.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2005 - Noûs 39 (1):1–42.
    You may not know me well enough to evaluate me in terms of my moral character, but I take it you believe I can be evaluated: it sounds strange to say that I am indeterminate, neither good nor bad nor intermediate. Yet I argue that the claim that most people are indeterminate is the conclusion of a sound argument—the indeterminacy paradox—with two premises: (1) most people are fragmented (they would behave deplorably in many and admirably in many other situations); (2) (...)
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  16. New Foundations for Imperative Logic I: Logical Connectives, Consistency, and Quantifiers.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2008 - Noûs 42 (4):529-572.
    Imperatives cannot be true or false, so they are shunned by logicians. And yet imperatives can be combined by logical connectives: "kiss me and hug me" is the conjunction of "kiss me" with "hug me". This example may suggest that declarative and imperative logic are isomorphic: just as the conjunction of two declaratives is true exactly if both conjuncts are true, the conjunction of two imperatives is satisfied exactly if both conjuncts are satisfied—what more is there to say? Much more, (...)
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  17. Whistleblowing: A Restrictive Definition and Interpretation. [REVIEW]Peter B. Jubb - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):77 - 94.
    Whistleblowing has been defined often and in differing ways in the literature. This paper has as its main purposes to clarify the meaning of whistleblowing and to speak for a narrow interpretation of it. A restrictive, general purpose definition is provided which contains six necessary elements: act of disclosure, actor, disclosure subject, target, disclosure recipient, and outcome.Whistleblowing is characterised as a dissenting act of public accusation against an organisation which necessitates being disloyal to that organisation. The definition differs from others (...)
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  18. Epsilon-Ergodicity and the Success of Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics.Peter B. M. Vranas - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (4):688-708.
    Why does classical equilibrium statistical mechanics work? Malament and Zabell (1980) noticed that, for ergodic dynamical systems, the unique absolutely continuous invariant probability measure is the microcanonical. Earman and Rédei (1996) replied that systems of interest are very probably not ergodic, so that absolutely continuous invariant probability measures very distant from the microcanonical exist. In response I define the generalized properties of epsilon-ergodicity and epsilon-continuity, I review computational evidence indicating that systems of interest are epsilon-ergodic, I adapt Malament and Zabell’s (...)
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  19. Gigerenzer's Normative Critique of Kahneman and Tversky.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2000 - Cognition 76 (3):179-193.
  20. In Defense of Imperative Inference.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (1):59 - 71.
    "Surrender; therefore, surrender or fight" is apparently an argument corresponding to an inference from an imperative to an imperative. Several philosophers, however (Williams 1963; Wedeking 1970; Harrison 1991; Hansen 2008), have denied that imperative inferences exist, arguing that (1) no such inferences occur in everyday life, (2) imperatives cannot be premises or conclusions of inferences because it makes no sense to say, for example, "since surrender" or "it follows that surrender or fight", and (3) distinct imperatives have conflicting permissive presuppositions (...)
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  21.  23
    The Old English Canon of Byrhtferth of Ramsey.Peter Baker - 1980 - Speculum 55 (1):22-37.
    Until the beginning of this century, Byrhtferth, a monk of the abbey of Ramsey in East Anglia and eleventh-century England's leading man of science, was best known as the author of works he probably did not write. While Byrhtferth's Latin Preface to the computistical miscellany in Oxford, St. John's College, MS 17, and his Latin and Old English Manual in MS Ashmole 328, the only two works he signed, remained unpublished, he was credited with Latin commentaries on Bede's De natura (...)
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  22. Hempel's Raven Paradox: A Lacuna in the Standard Bayesian Solution.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (3):545-560.
    According to Hempel's paradox, evidence (E) that an object is a nonblack nonraven confirms the hypothesis (H) that every raven is black. According to the standard Bayesian solution, E does confirm H but only to a minute degree. This solution relies on the almost never explicitly defended assumption that the probability of H should not be affected by evidence that an object is nonblack. I argue that this assumption is implausible, and I propose a way out for Bayesians. Introduction Hempel's (...)
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  23.  35
    Resolution in Type Theory.Peter B. Andrews - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):414-432.
  24. Who's Afraid of Undermining?Peter B. M. Vranas - 2002 - Erkenntnis 57 (2):151-174.
    The Principal Principle (PP) says that, for any proposition A, given any admissible evidence and the proposition that the chance of A is x%, one's conditional credence in A should be x%. Humean Supervenience (HS) claims that, among possible worlds like ours, no two differ without differing in the spacetime-point-by-spacetime-point arrangement of local properties. David Lewis (1986b, 1994a) has argued that PP contradicts HS, and the validity of his argument has been endorsed by Bigelow et al. (1993), Thau (1994), Hall (...)
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  25. What Time Travelers May Be Able to Do.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (1):115 - 121.
    Kadri Vihvelin, in "What time travelers cannot do" (Philos Stud 81: 315-330, 1996), argued that "no time traveler can kill the baby who in fact is her younger self, because (V1) "if someone would fail to do something, no matter how hard or how many times she tried, then she cannot do it", and (V2) if a time traveler tried to kill her baby self, she would always fail. Theodore Sider (Philos Stud 110: 115-138, 2002) criticized Vihvelin's argument, and Ira (...)
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  26.  7
    In Defense of Imperative Inference.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 55:85-92.
    “Surrender; therefore, surrender or fight” is apparently an argument corresponding to an inference from an imperative to an imperative. Several philosophers, however, have denied that imperative inferences exist, arguing that no such inferences occur in everyday life, imperatives cannot be premises or conclusions of inferences because it makes no sense to say, for example, “since surrender” or “it follows that surrender or fight”, and distinct imperatives have conflicting permissive presuppositions, so issuing distinct imperatives amounts to changing one’s mind and thus (...)
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  27.  32
    Naming in Young Children: A Dumb Attentional Mechanism?Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones & Barbara Landau - 1996 - Cognition 60 (2):143-171.
  28. Have Your Cake and Eat It Too: The Old Principal Principle Reconciled with the New.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):368–382.
    David Lewis (1980) proposed the Principal Principle (PP) and a “reformulation” which later on he called ‘OP’ (Old Principle). Reacting to his belief that these principles run into trouble, Lewis (1994) concluded that they should be replaced with the New Principle (NP). This conclusion left Lewis uneasy, because he thought that an inverse form of NP is “quite messy”, whereas an inverse form of OP, namely the simple and intuitive PP, is “the key to our concept of chance”. I argue (...)
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  29.  3
    A Restrictive Definition and Interpretation.Peter B. Jubb - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):77-94.
    Whistleblowing has been defined often and in differing ways in the literature. This paper has as its main purposes to clarify the meaning of whistleblowing and to speak for a narrow interpretation of it. A restrictive, general purpose definition is provided which contains six necessary elements: act of disclosure, actor, disclosure subject, target, disclosure recipient, and outcome.Whistleblowing is characterised as a dissenting act of public accusation against an organisation which necessitates being disloyal to that organisation. The definition differs from others (...)
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  30.  51
    General Models and Extensionality.Peter B. Andrews - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (2):395-397.
  31.  4
    Philosophical Counseling: Theory and Practice.Peter B. Raabe - 2001 - Praeger.
    Critiques existing theoretical approaches and practices of philosophical counseling and presents a new model.
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  32. Against Moral Character Evaluations: The Undetectability of Virtue and Vice.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (2-3):213 - 233.
    I defend the epistemic thesis that evaluations of people in terms of their moral character as good, bad, or intermediate are almost always epistemically unjustified. (1) Because most people are fragmented (they would behave deplorably in many and admirably in many other situations), one's prior probability that any given person is fragmented should be high. (2) Because one's information about specific people does not reliably distinguish those who are fragmented from those who are not, one's posterior probability that any given (...)
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  33. Can I Kill My Younger Self? Time Travel and the Retrosuicide Paradox.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):520-534.
    If time travel is possible, presumably so is my shooting my younger self ; then apparently I can kill him – I can commit retrosuicide. But if I were to kill him I would not exist to shoot him, so how can I kill him? The standard solution to this paradox understands ability as compossibility with the relevant facts and points to an equivocation about which facts are relevant: my killing YS is compossible with his proximity but not with his (...)
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  34. The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience.Peter B. Reiner - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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  35. Do Cry Over Spilt Milk: Possibly You Can Change the Past.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2005 - The Monist 88 (3):370-387.
    There is widespread agreement, even among those who accept the possibility of backward causation, that it is impossible to change the past. I argue that this agreement corresponds to a relatively uninteresting understanding of what changing the past amounts to. In one sense it is indeed impossible to change the past: in no possible world is an action performed which makes the past in that world different from the past in that world. In another sense, however, it may be possible (...)
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  36.  21
    Contractual Governance: Institutional and Organizational Analysis.Vincent-Jones Peter - 2000 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (3):317-351.
    This paper focuses on the role of contract as a governance mechanism in contemporary economic and social relations, exploring this theme in the context of recent writing on contract and contracting within law and other disciplines. The trends towards both outsourcing by private firms and privatization of public services have increased the importance of contract as an instrument of market and quasi-market exchange. Such organizational developments have been accompanied by institutional changes in the way in which business relationships are regulated (...)
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  37.  67
    “Ought” Implies “Can” but Does Not Imply “Must”: An Asymmetry Between Becoming Infeasible and Becoming Overridden.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (4):487-514.
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  38.  76
    I Ought, Therefore I Can Obey.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18.
    According to typical ought-implies-can principles, if you have an obligation to vaccinate me tomorrow, then you can vaccinate me tomorrow. Such principles are uninformative about conditional obligations: what if you only have an obligation to vaccinate me tomorrow if you synthesize a vaccine today? Then maybe you cannot vaccinate me tomorrow ; what you can do instead, I propose, is make it the case that the conditional obligation is not violated. More generally, I propose the ought-implies-can-obey principle: an agent has (...)
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  39.  47
    General Models, Descriptions, and Choice in Type Theory.Peter B. Andrews - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (2):385-394.
  40. Single-Case Probabilities and Content-Neutral Norms: A Reply to Gigerenzer.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2001 - Cognition 81 (1):105-111.
  41. Wittgenstein, Tolstoy, and Shakespeare.Peter B. Lewis - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):241-255.
  42.  21
    Have Your Cake and Eat It Too: The Old Principal Principle Reconciled with the New.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):368-382.
    David Lewis proposed the Principal Principle and a “reformulation” which later on he called ‘OP’. Reacting to his belief that these principles run into trouble, Lewis concluded that they should be replaced with the New Principle. This conclusion left Lewis uneasy, because he thought that an inverse form of NP is “quite messy”, whereas an inverse form of OP, namely the simple and intuitive PP, is “the key to our concept of chance”. I argue that, even if OP should be (...)
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  43. The Individuation of God: Integrating Science and Religion.Peter B. Todd (ed.) - 2012 - Chiron Publications.
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide array of disciplines including (...)
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  44.  10
    Testosterone and Jamaican Fathers.Peter B. Gray, Jody Reece, Charlene Coore-Desai, Twana Dinall, Sydonnie Pellington & Maureen Samms-Vaughan - 2017 - Human Nature 28 (2):201-218.
    This paper investigates relationships between men’s testosterone and family life in a sample of approximately 350 Jamaican fathers of children 18–24 months of age. The study recognizes the role of testosterone as a proximate mechanism coordinating and reflecting male life history allocations within specific family and cultural contexts. A sample of Jamaican fathers and/or father figures reported to an assessment center for an interview based on a standardized questionnaire and provided a saliva sample for measuring testosterone level. Outcomes measured include (...)
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  45. Imperatives, Logic Of.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 2575-2585.
    Suppose that a sign at the entrance of a hotel reads: “Don’t enter these premises unless you are accompanied by a registered guest”. You see someone who is about to enter, and you tell her: “Don’t enter these premises if you are an unaccompanied registered guest”. She asks why, and you reply: “It follows from what the sign says”. It seems that you made a valid inference from an imperative premise to an imperative conclusion. But it also seems that imperatives (...)
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  46. Teilhard and Other Modern Thinkers on Evolution, Mind, and Matter.Peter B. Todd - 2013 - Teilhard Studies (66):1-22.
    In his The Phenomenon of Man, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin develops concepts of consciousness, the noosphere, and psychosocial evolution. This paper explores Teilhard’s evolutionary concepts as resonant with thinking in psychology and physics. It explores contributions from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, and neuroscience to elucidate relationships between mind and matter. Teilhard’s work can be seen as advancing this psychological lineage or psychogenesis. That is, the evolutionary emergence of matter in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to the human brain and (...)
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  47. New Foundations for Imperative Logic Iii: A General Definition of Argument Validity.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2012 - Manuscript in Preparation.
    Besides pure declarative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are declaratives (“you sinned shamelessly; so you sinned”), and pure imperative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are imperatives (“repent quickly; so repent”), there are mixed-premise arguments, whose premises include both imperatives and declaratives (“if you sinned, repent; you sinned; so repent”), and cross-species arguments, whose premises are declaratives and whose conclusions are imperatives (“you must repent; so repent”) or vice versa (“repent; so you can repent”). I propose a general definition of argument (...)
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  48.  24
    Whose DAM Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman.Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida & Eliana Colunga - 2003 - Cognition 87 (3):209-213.
  49.  15
    Symposium: Are Character and Circumstances Co-Ordinate Factors in Human Life, or Is Either Subordinate to the Other?B. Bosanquet, E. E. C. Jones, William L. Gildea & Alexander F. Shand - 1895 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (2):112 - 122.
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  50.  15
    The Nature of Evolutionary Theory: The Semantic Challenge. [REVIEW]Peter B. Sloep & Wim J. Steen - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):1-15.
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