Results for 'Peter Boomgaard'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  2
    Peter Boomgaard. Frontiers of Fear: Tigers and People in the Malay World, 1600–1950. Xiv + 306 Pp., Illus., Tables, Notes, Bibl., Index. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2001. $37.50. [REVIEW]Robert Paddle - 2003 - Isis 94 (1):119-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Robert Paddle. The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine. X + 273 Pp., Illus., Figs., Tables, Bibl., Index. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000. $64.95. [REVIEW]Peter Boomgaard - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):724-725.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  29
    II—Peter Sullivan.Peter Sullivan - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):195-223.
  4.  25
    I–Peter Simons.Peter Simons - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):59-75.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  5.  29
    II—Peter Milne: What is the Normative Role of Logic?Peter Milne - 2009 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83 (1):269-298.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6.  17
    I—Peter Goldie: Virtues of Art and Human Well-Being.Peter Goldie - 2008 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):179-195.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  7. Do Animals Feel Pain?: Peter Harrison.Peter Harrison - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (255):25-40.
    In an oft-quoted passage from The Principles of Morals and Legislation, Jeremy Bentham addresses the issue of our treatment of animals with the following words: ‘the question is not, Can they reason? nor, can they talk? but, Can they suffer?’ The point is well taken, for surely if animals suffer, they are legitimate objects of our moral concern. It is curious therefore, given the current interest in the moral status of animals, that Bentham's question has been assumed to be merely (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  8.  8
    Peter McLaren’s Response to Michael Peters.Peter McLaren - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (8):838-843.
    Volume 52, Issue 8, July 2020, Page 838-843.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  12
    I—Peter Millican: Humes Old and New Four Fashionable Falsehoods, and One Unfashionable Truth.Peter Millican & Helen Beebee - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):163-199.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  72
    Value and Understanding: Essays for Peter Winch.Peter Winch & Raimond Gaita (eds.) - 1990 - Routledge.
    Written by eminent philosophers from Britain, Europe, America, and Australia, the essays of this collection are a tribute to Peter Winch, whose work is marked by his deep appreciation of the most fundamental aspect of Wittgenstein's legacy: that we cannot detach our concepts from their roots in human life. The voices in this volume unite in different tones of sympathy and criticism by discussing the theme of human conditioning: the human conditioning of what we can find intelligible, possible and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  52
    Peter Abelard.Peter King - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Peter Abelard (1079 – 21 April 1142) [‘Abailard’ or ‘Abaelard’ or ‘Habalaarz’ and so on] was the pre-eminent philosopher and theologian of the twelfth century. The teacher of his generation, he was also famous as a poet and a musician. Prior to the recovery of Aristotle, he brought the native Latin tradition in philosophy to its highest pitch. His genius was evident in all he did. He is, arguably, the greatest logician of the Middle Ages and is equally famous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Peter Abelard's Ethics.Peter Abelard - 1971 - Oxford, Clarendon Press.
    A penetrating and historically important critique of medieval moral thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13. Interview - Peter Singer.Peter Singer - 2008 - The Philosophers' Magazine 40 (40):59-60.
    Peter Singer is probably the best-known and most controversial ethicist in the world today. He rigorously applies utilitarian moral theory to issues such as world poverty, the environment, abortion, euthanasia and, most famously, animal welfare. He has also written a book about his grandfather, David Oppenheim, who died in Theresienstadt concentration camp. He is Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  51
    Orderly Decision Theory: Peter J. Hammond.Peter J. Hammond - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):292-297.
  15.  59
    Peter Damian: Could God Change the Past?Peter Remnant - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):259 - 268.
    Histories of philosophy frequently depict the later eleventh century as the scene of a series of bouts between dialecticians and anti-dialecticians — Berengar vs. Lanfranc, Roscelin vs. Anselm — preliminaries to the twelfth century welterweight contest between Abelard and St. Bernard and — dare one say? — the thirteenth century heavy-weight championship between St. Thomas and St. Bonaventure.The bouts took place — no question about that — but whether the contestants can properly be characterized as dialecticians and anti-dialecticians is less (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  24
    II—Peter Hacker:Substance: Things and Stuffs.Peter Hacker - 2004 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):41-63.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  23
    II–Peter Hylton.Peter Hylton - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):281-299.
  18.  50
    Locke’s Experimental Philosophy: Peter R. Anstey: John Locke and Natural Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 256pp, $65 HB.Matthew Stuart, Keith Campbell, Michael Jacovides & Peter Anstey - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):1-22.
    Serious philosophical reflection on the nature of experiment began in earnest in the seventeenth century. This paper expounds the most influential philosophy of experiment in seventeenth-century England, the Bacon-Boyle-Hooke view of experiment. It is argued that this can only be understood in the context of the new experimental philosophy practised according to the Baconian theory of natural history. The distinctive typology of experiments of this view is discussed, as well as its account of the relation between experiment and theory. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. The Architecture of the Mind: Massive Modularity and the Flexibility of Thought.Peter Carruthers - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book is a comprehensive development and defense of one of the guiding assumptions of evolutionary psychology: that the human mind is composed of a large number of semi-independent modules. The Architecture of the Mind has three main goals. One is to argue for massive mental modularity. Another is to answer a 'How possibly?' challenge to any such approach. The first part of the book lays out the positive case supporting massive modularity. It also outlines how the thesis should best (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   179 citations  
  20.  31
    Peter Westwick, The National Labs: Science in an American System, 1947–1974. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2002. [REVIEW]Peter Neushul - 2003 - Metascience 12 (3):443-445.
  21.  46
    32 Peter M. Sullivan.Peter Sullivan - manuscript
    Define ‘het’ as a predicate that truly applies to itself if and only if it does not truly apply to itself and which also truly applies to any predicate that does not truly apply to its own name. We know that the attempted definition of ‘hes’ is a failure, and so a fortiori is that of ‘het’. Similarly, there is no Qussell class which contains itself as a member if and only if it does not contain itself as a member, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  7
    Peter Winch in India 1986 Lecture on Simone Weil.Peter Winch - 2020 - Philosophical Investigations 43 (1-2):40-55.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Peter A. Stanwick Sarah D. Stanwick.Peter A. Stanwick - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17:195-204.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Freedom and Resentment.Peter Strawson - 1962 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 48: 1962. pp. 1-25.
    The doyen of living English philosophers, by these reflections, took hold of and changed the outlook of a good many other philosophers, if not quite enough. He did so, essentially, by assuming that talk of freedom and responsibility is talk not of facts or truths, in a certain sense, but of our attitudes. His more explicit concern was to look again at the question of whether determinism and freedom are consistent with one another -- by shifting attention to certain personal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   754 citations  
  25.  97
    Questions for Peter Singer.Peter Singer - unknown
    You don't say much about who you are teaching, or what subject you teach, but you do seem to see a need to justify what you are doing. Perhaps you're teaching underprivileged children, opening their minds to possibilities that might otherwise never have occurred to them. Or maybe you're teaching the children of affluent families and opening their eyes to the big moral issues they will face in life — like global poverty, and climate change. If you're doing something like (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Thinking About Mechanisms.Peter Machamer, Lindley Darden & Carl F. Craver - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (1):1-25.
    The concept of mechanism is analyzed in terms of entities and activities, organized such that they are productive of regular changes. Examples show how mechanisms work in neurobiology and molecular biology. Thinking in terms of mechanisms provides a new framework for addressing many traditional philosophical issues: causality, laws, explanation, reduction, and scientific change.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1012 citations  
  27. Scientific Reasoning: The Bayesian Approach.Peter Urbach & Colin Howson - 1993 - Open Court.
    Scientific reasoning is—and ought to be—conducted in accordance with the axioms of probability. This Bayesian view—so called because of the central role it accords to a theorem first proved by Thomas Bayes in the late eighteenth ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   467 citations  
  28. Objectivity in Historical Perspective: Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison: Objectivity. New York: Zone Books, 2007, 542pp, $38.95 HB, $28.95 PB.Peter Dear, Ian Hacking, Matthew L. Jones, Lorraine Daston & Peter Galison - 2012 - Metascience 21 (1):11-39.
    Objectivity in historical perspective Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 11-39 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9597-2 Authors Peter Dear, Department of History, Cornell University, 435 McGraw Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA Ian Hacking, Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto, 170 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5R 2M8, Canada Matthew L. Jones, Department of History, Columbia University, 514 Fayerweather Hall, 1180 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, USA Lorraine Daston, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  25
    What-If History of Science: Peter J. Bowler: Darwin Deleted: Imagining a World Without Darwin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, Ix+318pp, $30.00 HB.Peter J. Bowler, Robert J. Richards & Alan C. Love - 2015 - Metascience 24 (1):5-24.
    Alan C. LoveDarwinian calisthenicsAn athlete engages in calisthenics as part of basic training and as a preliminary to more advanced or intense activity. Whether it is stretching, lunges, crunches, or push-ups, routine calisthenics provide a baseline of strength and flexibility that prevent a variety of injuries that might otherwise be incurred. Peter Bowler has spent 40 years doing Darwinian calisthenics, researching and writing on the development of evolutionary ideas with special attention to Darwin and subsequent filiations among scientists exploring (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  14
    Peter Abelard.Peter King - 1992 - In The Dictionary of Literary Biography. pp. 3-14.
  31. What Things Do: Philosophical Reflections on Technology, Agency, and Design.Peter-Paul Verbeek - 2005 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek's What Things Do . The four things that Verbeek does well are: remind us of the importance of technological things; bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; explain how technology "co-shapes" experience by reading Bruno Latour's actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde's post-phenomenology; develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: analyze the material conditions in which things are produced; criticize the social-political (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  32. Ignorance: A Case for Scepticism.Peter Unger - 1975 - Oxford University Press.
    In these challenging pages, Unger argues for the extreme skeptical view that, not only can nothing ever be known, but no one can ever have any reason at all for anything. A consequence of this is that we cannot ever have any emotions about anything: no one can ever be happy or sad about anything. Finally, in this reduction to absurdity of virtually all our supposed thought, he argues that no one can ever believe, or even say, that anything is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   283 citations  
  33.  16
    Understanding Inconsistent Science.Peter Vickers - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Vickers examines 'inconsistent theories' in the history of science--theories which, though contradictory, are held to be extremely useful. He argues that these 'theories' are actually significantly different entities, and warns that the traditional goal of philosophy to make substantial, general claims about how science works is misguided.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  34. Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things.Peter-Paul Verbeek - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Technology permeates nearly every aspect of our daily lives. Cars enable us to travel long distances, mobile phones help us to communicate, and medical devices make it possible to detect and cure diseases. But these aids to existence are not simply neutral instruments: they give shape to what we do and how we experience the world. And because technology plays such an active role in shaping our daily actions and decisions, it is crucial, Peter-Paul Verbeek argues, that we consider (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  35. New Horizons in Psychology.Peter C. Wason - 1966 - Penguin Books.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   213 citations  
  36.  66
    A German Attack on Applied Ethics [1]: A Statement by Peter Singer.Peter Singer - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):85-91.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37. 10 Necessary Being: The Ontological Argument* Peter van Inwagen.Peter van Inwagen - 1999 - In Eleonore Stump & Michael J. Murray (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: The Big Questions. Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  3
    Some Aspects of Unger, Peter Identity, Consciousness and Value-Comments.Peter F. Strawson - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):145-148.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  31
    Redeeming the Text? Peter Schenk: Studien zur poetischen Kunst des Valerius Flaccus: Beobachtungen zur Ausgestaltung des Kriegsthemas in den Argonautica . (Zetemata 102.) Pp. 450. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1999. Paper, DM 148. ISBN: 3-406-453-147. G. Manuwald: Die Cyzicus-Episode und ihre Funktion in den 'Argonautica' des Valerius Flaccus (Hypomnemata: Untersuchungen zur Antike und zu ihrem Nachleben). Pp. 292. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1999. Paper, DM 96. ISBN: 3-525-25224-. [REVIEW]Peter Toohey - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (02):260-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  32
    The Puzzle of Peter.Peter Vardy - 2000 - The Philosophers' Magazine 10 (10):51-53.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  20
    Editorial Obituary Peter Wason (1924–2003).Peter Wason - 2003 - Thinking and Reasoning 9 (3):177-184.
  42.  4
    Human Nature: Peter Winch.Peter Winch - 1970 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 4:1-13.
    The concept of human nature usually enters discussions of the nature and implications of the social sciences in connection with one or another form of ‘relativism’. Confronted with the enormous and apparently conflicting variety of phenomena of human life at different places and times, we are inclined to ask whether there is not something which holds these phenomena together and unifies them. Stated thus baldly this question is no doubt so vague as to approach meaninglessness; it will have to be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Statistical Reasoning with Imprecise Probabilities.Peter Walley - 1991 - Chapman & Hall.
  44. Identity, Consciousness, and Value.Peter Unger - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    The topic of personal identity has prompted some of the liveliest and most interesting debates in recent philosophy. In a fascinating new contribution to the discussion, Peter Unger presents a psychologically aimed, but physically based, account of our identity over time. While supporting the account, he explains why many influential contemporary philosophers have underrated the importance of physical continuity to our survival, casting a new light on the work of Lewis, Nagel, Nozick, Parfit, Perry, Shoemaker, and others. Deriving from (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  45. The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy.Peter Winch - 1958 - Routledge.
    The problems dealt with in The Idea of a Social Science are philosophical. It is an attempt to place the social science, considered as a single group, on the intellectual map, with special attention to the relations of the discipline to philosophy on the one hand and the natural sciences on the other. The author holds that the relation between the social sciences and philosophy is commonly misunderstood because of certain fashionable misconceptions about the nature of philosophy, and because of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   141 citations  
  46. Reasoning.Peter C. Wason - 1966 - In B. Foss (ed.), New Horizons in Psychology. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. pp. 135-151.
  47.  91
    All the Power in the World.Peter Unger - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    This bold and original work of philosophy presents an exciting new picture of concrete reality. Peter Unger provocatively breaks with what he terms the conservatism of present-day philosophy, and returns to central themes from Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Russell. Wiping the slate clean, Unger works, from the ground up, to formulate a new metaphysic capable of accommodating our distinctly human perspective. He proposes a world with inherently powerful particulars of two basic sorts: one mental but not physical, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  48.  46
    XII. Narrative and Perspective; Values and Appropriate Emotions: Peter Goldie.Peter Goldie - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:201-220.
    To the realists.—You sober people who feel well armed against passion and fantasies and would like to turn your emptiness into a matter of pride and ornament: you call yourselves realists and hint that the world really is the way it appears to you. As if reality stood unveiled before you only, and you yourselves were perhaps the best part of it … But in your unveiled state are not even you still very passionate and dark creatures compared to fish, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  84
    Philosophical Relativity.Peter Unger - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    In this short but meaty book, Peter Unger questions the objective answers that have been given to central problems in philosophy. As Unger hypothesizes, many of these problems are unanswerable, including the problems of knowledge and scepticism, the problems of free will, and problems of causation and explanation. In each case, he argues, we arrive at one answer only relative to an assumption about the meaning of key terms, terms like "know" and like "cause," even while we arrive at (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  50.  74
    Comments on Peter van Inwagen’s Material Beings. [REVIEW]Jay F. Rosenberg & Peter van Inwagen - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):701.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000