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Peter Harrison [56]Peter M. C. Harrison [2]
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Peter Harrison
University of Queensland
  1.  78
    Theodicy and Animal Pain.Peter Harrison - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (247):79 - 92.
    The existence of evil is compatible with the existence of God, most theists would claim, because evil either results from the activities of free agents, or it contributes in some way toward their moral development. According to the ‘free-will defence’, evil and suffering are necessary consequences of free-will. Proponents of the ‘soul-making argument’—a theodicy with a different emphasis—argue that a universe which is imperfect will nurture a whole range of virtues in a way impossible either in a perfect world, or (...)
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  2. Descartes on animals.Peter Harrison - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):219-227.
    Did Descartes deny that animals can feel? While it has generally been assumed that he did, there has been some confusion over the fact that Descartes concedes to animals both sensations and passions'. John Cottingham, for example, has argued that while Descartes did insist that animals were automata, denying them thought and "self"-consciousness, none of these assertions entail the conclusion that animals do not feel. This paper examines both Cottingham's arguments and the relevant sections of Descartes' writings, concluding that Descartes (...)
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  3. Do Animals Feel Pain?Peter Harrison - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (255):25-40.
    In an oft-quoted passage fromThe Principles of Morals and Legislation, Jeremy Bentham addresses the issue of our treatment of animals with the following words: ‘the question is not, Can theyreason? nor, can theytalk? but, Can theysuffer?’ The point is well taken, for surely if animals suffer, they are legitimate objects of our moral concern. It is curious therefore, given the current interest in the moral status of animals, that Bentham's question has been assumed to be merely rhetorical. No-one has seriously (...)
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  4.  33
    Voluntarism and early modern science.Peter Harrison - 2002 - History of Science 40 (1):63-89.
  5.  77
    Adam Smith and the history of the invisible hand.Peter Harrison - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (1):29-49.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Adam Smith and the History of the Invisible HandPeter HarrisonFew phrases in the history of ideas have attracted as much attention as Smith’s “invisible hand,” and there is a large body of secondary literature devoted to it. In spite of this there is no consensus on what Smith might have intended when he used this expression, or on what role it played in Smith’s thought. Estimates of its significance (...)
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  6.  68
    Newtonian Science, Miracles, and the Laws of Nature.Peter Harrison - 1995 - Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (4):531 - 553.
    Newton, along with a number of other seventeenth-century scientists, is frequently charged with having held an inconsistent view of nature and its operations, believing on the one hand in immutable laws of nature, and on the other in divine interventions into the natural order. In this paper I argue that Newton, William Whiston, and Samuel Clarke, came to understand miracles, not as violations of laws of nature, but rather as beneficent coincidences which were remarkable either because they were unusual, or (...)
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  7. 'Religion' and the Religions in the English Enlightenment.Peter Harrison - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (1):122-123.
  8.  36
    The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion.Peter Harrison (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Explores the historical relations between science and religion and discusses contemporary issues with perspectives from cosmology, evolutionary biology and bioethics.
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  9. Laws of God or laws of nature?: natural order in the early modern period.Peter Harrison - 2019 - In Peter Harrison & Jon H. Roberts (eds.), Science Without God?: Rethinking the History of Scientific Naturalism. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
  10.  21
    Simultaneous consonance in music perception and composition.Peter M. C. Harrison & Marcus T. Pearce - 2020 - Psychological Review 127 (2):216-244.
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  11. A scientific buddhism?Peter Harrison - 2010 - Zygon 45 (4):861-869.
    This essay endorses the argument of Donald Lopez's Buddhism and Science and shows how the general thesis of the book is consonant with other historical work on the “discovery” of Buddhism and on the emergence of Western conceptions of religion. It asks whether one of the key claims of Buddhism and Science—that Buddhism pays a price for its flirtation with the modern sciences—might be applicable to science-and-religion discussions more generally.
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  12.  70
    Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England.Peter Harrison - 2001 - Isis 92:265-290.
    [Introduction]: Curiosity is now widely regarded, with some justification, as a vital ingredient of the inquiring mind and, more particularly, as a crucial virtue for the practitioner of the pure sciences. We have become accustomed to associate curiosity with innocence and, in its more mature manifestations, with the pursuit of truth for its own sake. It was not always so. The sentiments expressed in Sir John Davies's poem, published on the eve of the seventeenth century, paint a somewhat different picture. (...)
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  13.  17
    Science and secularization.Peter Harrison - 2017 - Intellectual History Review 27 (1):47-70.
    According to a long-standing narrative of Western modernity science is one of the main drivers of secularization. Science is said to have generated challenges to core religious beliefs and to have provided an alternative, rational way of looking at the world. This narrative typically relies on progressive and teleological understandings of history, and commitment to some version of an ongoing struggle between science and religion. By way of contrast, recent theories of secularization, such as that of Charles Taylor, have suggested (...)
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  14.  6
    Investigating the importance of self-theories of intelligence and musicality for students' academic and musical achievement.Daniel Müllensiefen, Peter Harrison, Francesco Caprini & Amy Fancourt - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  15.  10
    Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England.Peter Harrison - 2001 - Isis 92 (2):265-290.
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  16.  22
    What is natural theology?Peter Harrison - 2022 - Zygon 57 (1):114-140.
    Zygon®, Volume 57, Issue 1, Page 114-140, March 2022.
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  17.  81
    Linnaeus as a second Adam? Taxonomy and the religious vocation.Peter Harrison - 2009 - Zygon 44 (4):879-893.
    Swedish naturalist Carl von Linné (1707–1778) became known during his lifetime as a "second Adam" because of his taxonomic endeavors. The significance of this epithet was that in Genesis Adam was reported to have named the beasts—an episode that was usually interpreted to mean that Adam possessed a scientific knowledge of nature and a perfect taxonomy. Linnaeus's soubriquet exemplifies the way in which the Genesis narratives of creation were used in the early modern period to give religious legitimacy to scientific (...)
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  18.  28
    Voluntarism and the origins of modern science: A reply to John Henry.Peter Harrison - 2009 - History of Science 47 (2):223-231.
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  19.  35
    Original Sin and the Problem of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.Peter Harrison - 2002 - Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (2):239-259.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Ideas 63.2 (2002) 239-259 [Access article in PDF] Original Sin and the Problem of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe Peter Harrison It is not the philosophy received from Adam that teaches these things; it is that received from the serpent; for since Original Sin, the mind of man is quite pagan. It is this philosophy that, together with the errors of the senses, made (...)
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  20.  38
    Francis Bacon, Natural Philosophy, and the Cultivation of the Mind.Peter Harrison - 2012 - Perspectives on Science 20 (2):139-158.
    This paper suggests that Bacon offers an Augustinian (rather than a purely Stoic) model of the “culture of the mind.” He applies this conception to natural philosophy in an original way, and his novel application is informed by two related theological concerns. First, the Fall narrative provides a connection between the cultivation of the mind and the cultivation of the earth, both of which are seen as restorative of an original condition. Second, the fruit of the cultivation of the mind (...)
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  21.  68
    Animal souls, metempsychosis, and theodicy in seventeenth-century English thought.Peter Harrison - 0081 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):519-544.
  22.  17
    The Virtues of Animals in Seventeenth-Century Thought.Peter Harrison - 1998 - Journal of the History of Ideas 59 (3):463-484.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Virtues of Animals in Seventeenth-Century ThoughtPeter HarrisonDiscussions about animals—their purpose, their minds or souls, their interior operations, our duties towards them—have always played a role in human self-understanding. At no time, however, except perhaps our own, have such concerns sparked the magnitude of debate which took place during the course of the seventeenth century. The agenda had been set in the late 1500s by Montaigne, who had made (...)
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  23.  15
    Defining and defending the humanities.Peter Harrison - 2021 - Zygon 56 (3):678-690.
    In response to Willem Drees's What Are the Humanities For?, this article compares the ways in which, historically, the humanities and natural sciences have established their relevance and social legitimacy. Initially, from the period of the scientific revolution, the sciences had usually sought to justify themselves in terms of the moral and religious goals characteristic of the humanities. During the nineteenth century, however, considerations of practical utility came to displace the more traditional forms of justification. These new criteria have made (...)
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  24.  8
    Science Without God?: Rethinking the History of Scientific Naturalism.Peter Harrison & Jon H. Roberts (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    A collection of original essays offering a comprehensive history of the emergence of scientific naturalism. Beginning with the naturalists of ancient Greece, and proceeding through the middle ages, the scientific revolution, and into the nineteenth century, the contributors examine past ideas about 'nature' and 'the supernatural'. Ranging over different scientific disciplines and historical periods, they show how past thinkers often relied upon theological ideas and presuppositions in their systematic investigations of the world. In addition to providing material that contributes to (...)
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  25. Adam Smith, natural theology, and the natural sciences.Peter Harrison - 2011 - In Paul Oslington (ed.), Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge.
  26.  28
    Experimental religion and experimental science in early modern England.Peter Harrison - 2011 - Intellectual History Review 21 (4):413-433.
  27.  11
    Introduction: Evolution and historical explanation.Peter Harrison & Ian Hesketh - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 58:1-7.
  28. Science, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism.Peter Harrison - 2016 - Isis 107 (3):587-591.
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  29.  57
    The modern invention of “science‐and‐religion”: What follows?Peter Harrison - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):742-757.
    I am grateful to the four reviewers of The Territories of Science and Religion for their careful and insightful readings of the book, and their kind words about it. They all got the central arguments pretty much right, and thus any critical comments are not the result of fundamental misunderstandings. While there are some common themes in the assessments, each reviewer, happily, has offered a distinct perspective on the book. For this reason I will deal with their comments in turn, (...)
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  30.  14
    What was historical about natural history? Contingency and explanation in the science of living things.Peter Harrison - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 58:8-16.
  31.  20
    Naturalism and the Categories “Science” and “Religion”: A Response to Josh Reeves.Peter Harrison - 2023 - Zygon 58 (1):98-108.
    This article is a response to Josh Reeve's “A Defense of Science and Religion.” I begin with the disclaimer that this was not solely my project but a joint enterprise. A common commitment of participants was to make the disciplines of history and theology central to the discussion and explore what new possibilities follows for the field of science and religion. I then address Reeves's two central concerns: first that I am too dismissive of the categories “science” and “religion.” In (...)
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  32. Beliefs, Lebensformen, and conceptual history: Peter Harrison: The territories of science and religion. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2015, xiii+300pp, $30 Cloth.Peter Harrison - 2016 - Metascience 25 (3):363-370.
    Book Symposium on The Territories of Science and Religion (University of Chicago Press, 2015). The author responds to review essays by John Heilbron, Stephen Gaukroger, and Yiftach Fehige.
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  33.  26
    God and animal minds A response to Lynch.Peter Harrison - 1996 - Sophia 35 (2):67-78.
  34.  92
    Prophecy, Early Modern Apologetics, and Hume's Argument against Miracles.Peter Harrison - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (2):241 - 256.
    Hume’s "Of Miracles" concludes with the claim that prophecies, too, are miracles, and as such are susceptible to the same arguments which apply to miracles. However, both Hume and his commentators have overlooked the distinctive features of prophecy. Hume’s chief objection to miracles--that one is never justified in crediting second-hand testimony to miraculous events--does not necessarily apply to the argument from fulfilled prophecies as it was understood in the eighteenth century. Neither was prophecy necessarily thought to entail any breach of (...)
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  35. After Science and Religion: Fresh Perspectives From Philosophy and Theology.Peter Harrison & John Milbank (eds.) - 2022 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The popular field of 'science and religion' is a lively and well-established area. It is however a domain which has long been characterised by certain traits. In the first place, it tends towards an adversarial dialectic in which the separate disciplines, now conjoined, are forever locked in a kind of mortal combat. Secondly, 'science and religion' has a tendency towards disentanglement, where 'science' does one sort of thing and 'religion' another. And thirdly, the duo are frequently pushed towards some sort (...)
     
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  36. A theory of legislation from a systems perspective.Peter Harrison - unknown
    In this thesis I outline a view of primary legislation from a systems perspective. I suggest that systems theory and, in particular, autopoietic theory, as modified by field theory, is a mechanism for understanding how society operates. The description of primary legislation that I outline differs markedly from any conventional definition in that I argue that primary legislation is not, and indeed cannot be, either a law or any of the euphemisms that are usually accorded to an enactment by a (...)
     
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  37.  7
    Against unitary theories of music evolution.Peter M. C. Harrison & Madeleine Seale - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e76.
    Savage et al. and Mehr et al. provide well-substantiated arguments that the evolution of musicality was shaped by adaptive functions of social bonding and credible signalling. However, they are too quick to dismiss byproduct explanations of music evolution, and to present their theories as complete unitary accounts of the phenomenon.
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  38.  12
    Beliefs, Lebensformen, and conceptual history.Peter Harrison - 2016 - Metascience 25 (3):363-370.
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  39.  5
    God and Animal Minds.Peter Harrison - 1996 - Sophia 35 (2):67-78.
  40.  5
    Historia’s History.Peter Harrison - 2007 - Metascience 16 (2):321-325.
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  41.  13
    Narratives of secularization.Peter Harrison - 2017 - Intellectual History Review 27 (1):1-6.
    According to a long-standing narrative of Western modernity science is one of the main drivers of secularization. Science is said to have generated challenges to core religious beliefs and to have provided an alternative, rational way of looking at the world. This narrative typically relies on progressive and teleological understandings of history, and commitment to some version of an ongoing struggle between science and religion. By way of contrast, recent theories of secularization, such as that of Charles Taylor, have suggested (...)
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  42.  7
    Philosophy and the Crisis of Religion.Peter Harrison - 2007 - In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 234--249.
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  43.  16
    Science and Dissent.Peter Harrison - 2006 - Minerva 44 (2):223-227.
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  44. The cultural authority of natural history in early modern europe.Peter Harrison - 2010 - In Denis R. Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  45.  3
    The Neo-Cartesian Revival: A Response.Peter Harrison - 1993 - Between the Species 9 (2):5.
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  46.  11
    The secularization of the European mind in the 19th century.Peter Harrison - 1993 - History of European Ideas 17 (1):123-124.
  47.  6
    „Wissenschaft“¹ und „Religion“: Das Konstruieren der Grenzen.Peter Harrison - 2014 - In Christian Tapp & Christof Breitsameter (eds.), Theologie Und Naturwissenschaften. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 39-68.
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  48.  92
    The Theologian's Doubts: Natural Philosophy and the Skeptical Games of Ghazali. [REVIEW]Craig Brandist, James G. Buickerood, James E. Crimmins, Jonathan Elukin, Matt Erlin, Matthew R. Goodrum, Paul Guyer, Leor Halevi, Neil Hargraves & Peter Harrison - 2002 - Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (1):19-39.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Theologian's Doubts:Natural Philosophy and the Skeptical Games of GhazālīLeor HaleviIn the history of skeptical thought, which normally leaps from the Pyrrhonists to the rediscovery of Sextus Empiricus in the sixteenth century, Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad al-Ghazālī (1058-1111) figures as a medieval curiosity. Skeptical enough to merit passing acknowledgment, he has proven too baffling to be treated fully alongside pagan, atheist, or materialist philosophers. As a theologian defending certain Muslim (...)
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  49.  3
    Barbara M. Benedict. Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry. x + 321 pp., frontis., illus., index.Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2001. $45. [REVIEW]Peter Harrison - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):120-121.
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  50.  20
    Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry. [REVIEW]Peter Harrison - 2002 - Isis 93:120-121.
    In recent years historians of science have come to an increasing appreciation of the role played by such moral and affective categories as “trust,” “wonder,” “pedantry,” and “self‐discipline” in the knowledge‐making enterprises of the early modern period. Barbara Benedict's book on curiosity is a most welcome contribution to the literature devoted to such topics. In a lively and entertaining work, Benedict sets out to “analyse literary representations of the way curious people, including scientists, authors, performers, and readers, were engaged in (...)
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