Results for 'Peter J. Best'

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  1.  40
    Sustainability Reporting and Assurance: A Historical Analysis on a World-Wide Phenomenon.Renzo Mori Junior, Peter J. Best & Julie Cotter - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):1-11.
    Sustainability reporting and assurance of sustainability reports have been used by organizations in an attempt to provide accountability to their stakeholders. A better understanding of current practices is important to provide a base for comparative and trend analyses. This paper aims to consolidate and provide information on sustainability reporting, assurance of sustainability reports and types of assurance providers. Another aim of this paper is to provide a descriptive analysis of these practices for a global sample, comparing results with previous studies, (...)
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  2. Epistemic Entitlement.Peter J. Graham - 2012 - Noûs 46 (3):449-482.
    What is the best account of process reliabilism about epistemic justification, especially epistemic entitlement? I argue that entitlement consists in the normal functioning (proper operation) of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Etiological functions involve consequence explanation: a belief-forming process has forming true beliefs reliably as a function just in case forming-true beliefs reliably partly explains the persistence of the process. This account paves the way for avoiding standard objections to (...)
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  3. Does Justification Aim at Truth?Peter J. Graham - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):51-72.
    Does epistemic justification aim at truth? The vast majority of epistemologists instinctively answer 'Yes'; it's the textbook response. Joseph Cruz and John Pollock surprisingly say no. In 'The Chimerical Appeal of Epistemic Externalism' they argue that justification bears no interesting connection to truth; justification does not even aim at truth. 'Truth is not a very interesting part of our best understanding' of justification (C&P 2004, 137); it has no 'connection to the truth.' A 'truth-aimed ... epistemology is not entitled (...)
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  4. Assertions, Handicaps, and Social Norms.Peter J. Graham - 2020 - Episteme 8:1-15.
    How should we undertand the role of norms—especially epistemic norms—governing assertive speech acts? Mitchell Green (2009) has argued that these norms play the role of handicaps in the technical sense from the animal signals literature. As handicaps, they then play a large role in explaining the reliability—and so the stability (the continued prevalence)—of assertive speech acts. But though norms of assertion conceived of as social norms do indeed play this stabilizing role, these norms are best understood as deterrents and (...)
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  5.  23
    Foundations of Social Choice Theory.Peter J. Hammond - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):423-427.
    The essays in this volume, first published in 1986, examine the philosophical foundations of social choice theory. This field, a modern and sophisticated outgrowth of welfare economics, is best known for a series of impossibility theorems, of which the first and most crucial was proved by Kenneth Arrow in 1950. That has often been taken to show the impossibility of democracy as a procedure for making collective decisions. However, this interpretation is challenged by several of the contributors here. Other (...)
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  6.  22
    Emotion and Motivation: Toward Consensus Definitions and a Common Research Purpose.Peter J. Lang - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):229-233.
    Historically, the hypothesis driving emotion research has been that emotion’s data-base—in language, physiology, and behavior— is organized around specific mental states, as reflected in evaluative language. It is suggested that this approach has not greatly advanced a natural science of emotion and that the developing motivational model of emotion defines a better path: emotion is an evolved trait founded on motivational neural circuitry shared by mammalian species, primitively prompting heightened perceptual processing and reflex mobilization for action to appetitive or threatening (...)
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  7.  29
    Cultural Innovations and Demographic Change.Peter J. Richerson - unknown
    Demography plays a large role in cultural evolution through its effects on the effective rate of innovation. If we assume that useful inventions are rare, then small isolated societies will have low rates of invention. In small populations, complex technology will tend to be lost as a result of random loss or incomplete transmission (the Tasmanian effect). Large populations have more inventors and are more resistant to loss by chance. If human populations can grow freely, then a population-technology-population positive feedback (...)
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  8.  86
    Four Strategies for Dealing with the Counting Anomaly in Spontaneous Collapse Theories of Quantum Mechanics.Peter J. Lewis - 2003 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (2):137 – 142.
    A few years ago, I argued that according to spontaneous collapse theories of quantum mechanics, arithmetic applies to macroscopic objects only as an approximation. Several authors have written articles defending spontaneous collapse theories against this charge, including Bassi and Ghirardi, Clifton and Monton, and now Frigg. The arguments of these authors are all different and all ingenious, but in the end I think that none of them succeeds, for reasons I elaborate here. I suggest a fourth line of response, based (...)
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  9.  16
    Assertions, Handicaps, and Social Norms.Peter J. Graham - 2020 - Episteme 17 (3):349-363.
    How should we undertand the role of norms – especially epistemic norms – governing assertive speech acts? Mitchell Green has argued that these norms play the role of handicaps in the technical sense from the animal signals literature. As handicaps, they then play a large role in explaining the reliability – and so the stability – of assertive speech acts. But though norms of assertion conceived of as social norms do indeed play this stabilizing role, these norms are best (...)
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  10. Simple Models of Complex Phenomena: The Case of Cultural Evolution.Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd - 1987 - In John Dupre (ed.), The Latest on the Best: Essays on Evolution and Optimality. MIT Press. pp. 27--52.
     
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  11.  19
    Implications of an Ethic of Privacy for Human-Centred Systems Engineering.Peter J. Carew, Larry Stapleton & Gabriel J. Byrne - 2008 - AI and Society 22 (3):385-403.
    Privacy remains an intractable ethical issue for the information society, and one that is exacerbated by modern applications of artificial intelligence. Given its complicity, there is a moral obligation to redress privacy issues in systems engineering practice itself. This paper investigates the role the concept of privacy plays in contemporary systems engineering practice. Ontologically a nominalist human concept, privacy is considered from an appropriate engineering perspective: human-centred design. Two human-centred design standards are selected as exemplars of best practice, and (...)
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  12.  10
    The Under-Recognized Implications of Heterogeneity: Opportunities for Fresh Views on Scientific, Philosophical, and Social Debates About Heritability.Peter J. Taylor - 2008 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 30 (3-4):431 - 456.
    Despite a long history of debates about the heritability of human traits by researchers and other critical commentators, the possible heterogeneity of genetic and environmental factors that underlie patterns in observed traits has not been recognized as a significant conceptual and methodological issue. This article is structured to stimulate a wide range of readers to pursue diverse implications of underlying heterogeneity and of its absence from previous debates. Section 1, a condensed critique of previous conceptualizations and interpretations of heritability studies, (...)
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  13.  52
    Culture and the Evolution of Obesity.Peter J. Brown - 1991 - Human Nature 2 (1):31-57.
    Human predispositions to fatness and obesity are best understood in the context of cultural and biological evolution. Both genes and cultural traits that were adaptive in the context of past food scarcities play a role today in the etiology of maladaptive adult obesity. The etiology of obesity must account for the social distribution of the condition with regard to gender, ethnicity, social class, and economic modernization. This distribution, which has changed throughout history, undoubtedly involves cultural factors. A model of (...)
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  14.  16
    Inference to the Best Explanation: The Case of Potential Energy.Peter J. Riggs - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (1):99-116.
    It has been claimed that kinetic energy is an objective physical quantity whilst at the same time maintaining that potential energy is not. However, by making use of the method of ‘inference to the best explanation’, it may be readily concluded that potential energy is indeed an objective physical quantity. This is done for an example drawn from the foundations of modern chemistry. In order to do so, the criteria of what counts as ‘most probable’ and ‘most reasonable’ are (...)
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  15.  12
    A Scenario Approach to the Simonshaven Case.Peter J. Van Koppen & Anne Ruth Mackor - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1132-1151.
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  16. Homer on the Gods and Human Virtue: Creating the Foundations of Classical Civilization.Peter J. Ahrensdorf - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book seeks to restore Homer to his rightful place among the principal figures in the history of political and moral philosophy. Through this fresh and provocative analysis of the Iliad and the Odyssey, Peter J. Ahrensdorf examines Homer's understanding of the best life, the nature of the divine, and the nature of human excellence. According to Ahrensdorf, Homer teaches that human greatness eclipses that of the gods, that the contemplative and compassionate singer ultimately surpasses the heroic warrior (...)
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  17.  29
    The Many Meanings of “Cost” and “Benefit:” Biological Altruism, Biological Agency, and the Identification of Social Behaviours.Peter J. Woodford - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):4.
    The puzzle of how altruism can evolve has been at the center of recent debates over Hamilton’s Rule, inclusive fitness, and kin-selection. In this paper, I use recent debates over altruism and Hamilton’s legacy as an example to illustrate a more general problem in evolutionary theory that has philosophical significance; I attempt to explain this significance and to draw a variety of conclusions about it. The problem is that specific behaviours and general concepts of organism agency and intentionality are defined (...)
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  18.  13
    Quantum Mechanics, Emergence, and Fundamentality.Peter J. Lewis - unknown
    Quantum mechanics arguably provides the best evidence we have for strong emergence. Entangled pairs of particles apparently have properties that fail to supervene on the properties of the particles taken individually. But at the same time, quantum mechanics is a terrible place to look for evidence of strong emergence: the interpretation of the theory is so contested that drawing any metaphysical conclusions from it is risky at best. I run through the standard argument for strong emergence based on (...)
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  19.  14
    Ethics in the Post-Shoah Era.Peter J. Haas - 2001 - Ethical Perspectives 8 (2):105-116.
    In 1988, my book Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic first appeared. The book generated a variety of responses, some positive and enthusiastic and some quite negative. The reason for these responses, of course, was that in the book I staked out a discomforting, and so controversial, position. The overarching conviction which led to the writing of the book was that, like in so many other areas, the process of thinking about ethics and doing moral philosophy (...)
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  20.  1
    Habermas’s Politics of Rational Freedom: Navigating the History of Philosophy Between Faith and Knowledge.Peter J. Verovšek - 2020 - Analyse & Kritik 42 (1):191-218.
    Despite his hostility to religion in his early career, since the turn of the century Habermas has devoted his research to the relationship between faith and knowledge. His two-volume Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie is the culmination of this project. Spurred by the attacks of 9/11 and the growing conflict between religion and the forces of secularization, I argue that this philosophy of history is the centerpiece of an important turning point in Habermas’s intellectual development. Instead of interpreting religion merely (...)
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  21.  12
    No Convincing Evidence for a Biological Preparedness Explanation of Phobias.Peter J. de Jong & Harald Merckelbach - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):362-363.
    The nonrandom distribution of fears is not as clearly related to phylogenetically survival relevance as preparedness theory seems to imply. Although delayed extinction reflects some of the best human evidence for preparedness, even this phenomenon is not as robust as it once seemed to be. Apart from the evidence reviewed by Davey, recent studies from our laboratory provide further evidence for an expectancy bias model of selective associations.
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  22.  56
    Inference to the Best Explanation and Epistemic Circularity.J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard - 2017 - In Kevin McCain & Ted Poston (eds.), Best Explanations: New Essays on Inference to the Best Explanation. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.
    Inference to the best explanation—or, IBE—tells us to infer from the available evidence to the hypothesis which would, if correct, best explain that evidence. As Peter Lipton puts it, the core idea driving IBE is that explanatory considerations are a guide to inference. But what is the epistemic status of IBE, itself? One issue of contemporary interest is whether it is possible to provide a justification for IBE itself which is non- objectionably circular. We aim to carve (...)
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  23.  53
    Newton and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gravitation as the Balance of the Heavens.Peter Machamer, J. E. Mcguire & Hylarie Kochiras - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):370-388.
    We argue that Isaac Newton really is best understood as being in the tradition of the Mechanical Philosophy and, further, that Newton saw himself as being in this tradition. But the tradition as Newton understands it is not that of Robert Boyle and many others, for whom the Mechanical Philosophy was defined by contact action and a corpuscularean theory of matter. Instead, as we argue in this paper, Newton interpreted and extended the Mechanical Philosophy's slogan “matter and motion” in (...)
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  24. Peter van Inwagen on Gratuitous Evil.Klaas J. Kraay - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (2):217-234.
    Defenders and critics of the evidential argument from evil typically agree that if theism is true, no gratuitous evil occurs. But Peter van Inwagen has challenged this orthodoxy by urging that for all we know, given God's goals, it is impossible for God to prevent all gratuitous evil, in which case God is not required do so. If van Inwagen is right, the evidential argument from evil fails. After setting out this striking and innovative move, I examine three responses (...)
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  25.  94
    The Evolution of Self-Knowledge.Peter Carruthers, Logan Fletcher & J. Brendan Ritchie - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (2):13-37.
    Humans have the capacity for awareness of many aspects of their own mental lives—their own experiences, feelings, judgments, desires, and decisions. We can often know what it is that we see, hear, feel, judge, want, or decide. This article examines the evolutionary origins of this form of self-knowledge. Two alternatives are contrasted and compared with the available evidence. One is first-person based: self-knowledge is an adaptation designed initially for metacognitive monitoring and control. The other is third-person based: self-knowledge depends on (...)
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  26.  2
    Promoting the Best as an Incentive : Reply to Pluchino Et Al. On the Peter Principle.Erik J. Olsson & Carlo Proietti - unknown
    The Peter Principle states that employees tend to be promoted until they reach their level of incompetence. In a sophisticated simulation study, Pluchino et al confirmed a version of the principle. However, they also noted that their model has the counterintuitive consequence that “the best ways for improving the efficiency of a given organization are either to promote each time an agent at random or to promote randomly the best and the worst members”. We argue that what (...)
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  27.  27
    Can We Make Sense of the Notion of Trustworthy Technology?Philip J. Nickel, Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3):429-444.
    In this paper we raise the question whether technological artifacts can properly speaking be trusted or said to be trustworthy. First, we set out some prevalent accounts of trust and trustworthiness and explain how they compare with the engineer’s notion of reliability. We distinguish between pure rational-choice accounts of trust, which do not differ in principle from mere judgments of reliability, and what we call “motivation-attributing” accounts of trust, which attribute specific motivations to trustworthy entities. Then we consider some examples (...)
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  28.  7
    The Latest on the Best: Essays on Evolution and Optimality : Conference on Evolution and Information : Papers.John Dupré (ed.) - 1987 - MIT Press.
    Controversies about optimality models and adaptationist methodologies have animated the discussions of evolutionary theory in recent years. The sociobiologists, following the lead of E. O. Wilson, have argued that if Darwinian natural selection can be reliably expected to produce the best possible type of organism - one that optimizes the value of its genetic contribution to future generations - then evolution becomes a powerfully predictive theory as well as an explanatory one. The enthusiastic claims of the sociobiologists for the (...)
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  29. Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience.Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.) - 2009 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    This book brings together some of the best minds in neurology and philosophy to discuss the concept of personal identity and the moral dimensions of treating ...
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  30.  89
    Can We Make Sense of the Notion of Trustworthy Technology?Philip J. Nickel, Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):429-444.
    In this paper we raise the question whether technological artifacts can properly speaking be trusted or said to be trustworthy. First, we set out some prevalent accounts of trust and trustworthiness and explain how they compare with the engineer’s notion of reliability. We distinguish between pure rational-choice accounts of trust, which do not differ in principle from mere judgments of reliability, and what we call “motivation-attributing” accounts of trust, which attribute specific motivations to trustworthy entities. Then we consider some examples (...)
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  31.  79
    Human Security and Liberal Peace.Endre Begby & J. Peter Burgess - 2009 - Public Reason 1 (1):91-104.
    This paper addresses a recent wave of criticisms of liberal peacebuilding operations. We decompose the critics’ argument into two steps, one which offers a diagnosis of what goes wrong when things go wrong in peacebuilding operations, and a second, which argues on the basis of the first step that there is some deep principled flaw in the very idea of liberal peacebuilding. We show that the criticism launched in the argument’s first step is valid and important, but that the second (...)
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  32. Über die ersten sechs Sätze der Monadologie.Johannes Czermak, Georg J. W. Dorn, Peter Kaliba, Edward Nieznanski, Christine Pühringer & Christian Zwickl-Bernhard - 1982 - Conceptus: Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie 16 (38):89–96.
    This is, to the best of my knowledge, the first published attempt at a rigorous logical formalization of a passage in Leibniz's Monadology. The method we followed was suggested by Johannes Czermak.
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  33.  16
    Model-Based Influences on Humans' Choices and Striatal Prediction Errors.Nathaniel D. Daw, Samuel J. Gershman, Ben Seymour, Peter Dayan & Raymond J. Dolan - 2011 - Neuron 69 (6):1204-1215.
    The mesostriatal dopamine system is prominently implicated in model-free reinforcement learning, with fMRI BOLD signals in ventral striatum notably covarying with model-free prediction errors. However, latent learning and devaluation studies show that behavior also shows hallmarks of model-based planning, and the interaction between model-based and model-free values, prediction errors, and preferences is underexplored. We designed a multistep decision task in which model-based and model-free influences on human choice behavior could be distinguished. By showing that choices reflected both influences we could (...)
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  34.  45
    Renaissance Latin Drama in England - E. F. J. Tucker: George Ruggle, Ignoramus. Pp. Iv + 226. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 1987. Paper, DM 98. - Thomas W. Best: Cancer, Edmund Stubbe, Fraus Honesta. Pp. Iv + 294. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 1987. Paper, DM 118. - Susan Brock: Walter Hawkesworth, Leander, Labyrinthus. Pp. Ii+192. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 1987. Paper, DM 138. - John C. Coldewey, Brian F. Copenhaver: Thomas Watson, Antigone; William Alabaster, Roxana; Peter Mease, Adrastus Parentans Sive Vindicta. Pp. Iv+178. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 1987. Paper, DM 98. [REVIEW]G. Eatough - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):129-131.
  35.  60
    Orderly Decision Theory: Peter J. Hammond.Peter J. Hammond - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):292-297.
  36.  89
    On Fodor's Problem.Peter Carruthers - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (5):502-523.
    This paper sketches a solution to a problem which has been emphasized by Fodor. This is the problem of how to explain distinctively-human flexible cognition in modular terms. There are three aspects to the proposed account. First, it is suggested that natural language sentences might serve to integrate the outputs of a number of conceptual modules. Second, a creative sentence-generator, or supposer, is postulated. And third, it is argued that a set of principles of inference to the best explanation (...)
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  37.  34
    What-If History of Science: Peter J. Bowler: Darwin Deleted: Imagining a World Without Darwin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, Ix+318pp, $30.00 HB.Peter J. Bowler, Robert J. Richards & Alan C. Love - 2015 - Metascience 24 (1):5-24.
    Alan C. LoveDarwinian calisthenicsAn athlete engages in calisthenics as part of basic training and as a preliminary to more advanced or intense activity. Whether it is stretching, lunges, crunches, or push-ups, routine calisthenics provide a baseline of strength and flexibility that prevent a variety of injuries that might otherwise be incurred. Peter Bowler has spent 40 years doing Darwinian calisthenics, researching and writing on the development of evolutionary ideas with special attention to Darwin and subsequent filiations among scientists exploring (...)
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  38. From Data to Causes III: Bayesian Priors for General Cross-Lagged Panel Models.Michael J. Zyphur, Ellen L. Hamaker, Louis Tay, Manuel Voelkle, Kristopher J. Preacher, Zhen Zhang, Paul D. Allison, Dean C. Pierides, Peter Koval & Edward F. Diener - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This article describes some potential uses of Bayesian estimation for time-series and panel data models by incorporating information from prior probabilities in addition to observed data. Drawing on econometrics and other literatures we illustrate the use of informative “shrinkage” or “small variance” priors while extending prior work on the general cross-lagged panel model. Using a panel dataset of national income and subjective well-being we describe three key benefits of these priors. First, they shrink parameter estimates toward zero or toward each (...)
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  39.  41
    Teaching America: The Case for Civic Education.David J. Feith, Seth Andrew, Charles F. Bahmueller, Mark Bauerlein, John M. Bridgeland, Bruce Cole, Alan M. Dershowitz, Mike Feinberg, Senator Bob Graham, Chris Hand, Frederick M. Hess, Eugene Hickok, Michael Kazin, Senator Jon Kyl, Jay P. Lefkowitz, Peter Levine, Harry Lewis, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Secretary Rod Paige, Charles N. Quigley, Admiral Mike Ratliff, Glenn Harlan Reynolds, Jason Ross, Andrew J. Rotherham, John R. Thelin & Juan Williams - 2011 - R&L Education.
    This book taps the best American thinkers to answer the essential American question: How do we sustain our experiment in government of, by, and for the people? Authored by an extraordinary and politically diverse roster of public officials, scholars, and educators, these chapters describe our nation's civic education problem, assess its causes, offer an agenda for reform, and explain the high stakes at risk if we fail.
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  40.  34
    Reductive Explanation and the "Explanatory Gap".Peter Carruthers - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):153-173.
    Can phenomenal consciousness be given a reductive natural explanation? Exponents of an ‘explanatory gap’ between physical, functional and intentional facts, on the one hand, and the facts of phenomenal consciousness, on the other, argue that there are reasons of principle why phenomenal consciousness cannot be reductively explained: Jackson, ; Levine,, ; McGinn ; Sturgeon, ; Chalmers,. Some of these writers claim that the existence of such a gap would warrant a belief in some form of ontological dualism, whereas others argue (...)
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  41.  41
    Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity: A Reply to Brian Leiter and Peter Kail.J. Emden Christian - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (1):95-118.
    Brian Leiter and Peter Kail have delivered thoughtful critiques of my book, Nietzsche’s Naturalism: Philosophy and the Life Sciences in the Nineteenth Century.1 It is a great pleasure to respond to these critiques, since they raise some crucial issues with regard to Nietzsche’s understanding of naturalism and normativity. On the one hand, there are many areas of agreement: Nietzsche’s philosophical project is best understood along the lines of naturalism; developments in the nineteenth-century life sciences, broadly speaking, play a (...)
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  42.  15
    Competitive Sport, Winning and Education/Peter J. Arnold.J. Arnold Peter - 1989 - Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):15-25.
  43.  7
    Thinking About Causes: From Greek Philosophy to Modern Physics.Peter Machamer & Gereon Wolters (eds.) - 2007 - Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Emerging as a hot topic in the mid-twentieth century, causality is one of the most frequently discussed issues in contemporary philosophy. Causality has been a central concept in philosophy as well as in the sciences, especially the natural sciences, dating back to its beginning in Greek thought. David Hume famously claimed that causality is the cement of the universe. In general terms, it links eventualities, predicts the consequences of action, and is the cognitive basis for the acquisition and the use (...)
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  44.  55
    Quantum Ontology: A Guide to the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics.Peter J. Lewis - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Metaphysicians should pay attention to quantum mechanics. Why? Not because it provides definitive answers to many metaphysical questions-the theory itself is remarkably silent on the nature of the physical world, and the various interpretations of the theory on offer present conflicting ontological pictures. Rather, quantum mechanics is essential to the metaphysician because it reshapes standard metaphysical debates and opens up unforeseen new metaphysical possibilities. Even if quantum mechanics provides few clear answers, there are good reasons to think that any adequate (...)
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  45.  25
    Schizoid Femininities and Interstitial Spaces: Childhood and Gender in Celine Sciamma’s Tomboy and P.J. Hogan’s Peter Pan.Robbie Duschinsky - 2015 - Diogenes 62 (1):128-140.
    Childhood innocence has often been treated by scholars as an empty, idealised signifier. This article contests such accounts, arguing that innocence is best regarded as a powerfully unmarked training in heternormativity, alongside class and race norms. This claim will be demonstrated through attention to two recent films addressing childhood: Celine Sciamma’s Tomboy and P.J. Hogan’s Peter Pan. The films characterise young femininity as an ‘impossible space’, in which subjects face the contradictory, schizoid demands to simultaneously show both childhood (...)
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  46.  2
    Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution.Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd - 2005 - Chicago University Press.
    Acknowledgments 1. Culture Is Essential 2. Culture Exists 3. Culture Evolves 4. Culture Is an Adaptation 5. Culture Is Maladaptive 6. Culture and Genes Coevolve 7. Nothing about Culture Makes Sense except in the Light of Evolution.
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  47.  28
    A Generalization of the Limit Lemma and Clopen Games.Peter Clote - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (2):273-291.
    We give a new characterization of the hyperarithmetic sets: a set X of integers is recursive in e α if and only if there is a Turing machine which computes X and "halts" in less than or equal to the ordinal number ω α of steps. This result represents a generalization of the well-known "limit lemma" due to J. R. Shoenfield [Sho-1] and later independently by H. Putnam [Pu] and independently by E. M. Gold [Go]. As an application of this (...)
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  48.  9
    Le Sublime Et la Fiction.Peter McCormick - 1996 - Philosophiques 23 (1):93-112.
    Il y a des oeuvres d'art poétiques, et en particulier quelques poèmes modernistes, qui nous offrent des représentations du sublime dans un de ses aspects les plus problématiques. Cet aspect comporte la simultanéité des éléments à la fois subjectifs et objectifs. Mais comment peut-on comprendre le sublime sous ce double masque ? Comment se fait-il que le sublime puis- se être à la/ois objectif et subjectif? Dans cet article je propose d'articuler ces deux aspects du sublime en ayant recours aux (...)
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  49. Temporal Parts and Their Individuation.J. Copeland, H. Dyke & D. Proudfoot - 2002 - Analysis 61 (4):289-292.
    Ignoring the temporal dimension, an object such as a railway tunnel or a human body is a three-dimensional whole composed of three-dimensional parts. The four-dimensionalist holds that a physical object exhibiting identity across time—Descartes, for example—is a four-dimensional whole composed of 'briefer' four-dimensional objects, its temporal parts. Peter van Inwagen (1990) has argued that four-dimensionalism cannot be sustained, or at best can be sustained only by a counterpart theorist. We argue that different schemes of individuation of temporal parts (...)
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  50.  80
    The Four Umpires: A Paradigm for Ethical Leadership. [REVIEW]Cam Caldwell, Sheri J. Bischoff & Ranjan Karri - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):153 - 163.
    Theories of leadership have traditionally focused on leadership traits, styles, and situational factors that influence leader behaviors. We propose that The Four Umpires Model described herein, which examines how four leadership types view reality and perception, provides a useful example of an effective steward leader. We use the Five Beliefs Model identified by Edgar Schein and Peter Senge to frame the implicit assumptions underlying the core beliefs and mental models of each of the four umpires. We suggest that the (...)
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