Results for 'Peter J. Carrington'

996 found
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  1.  85
    Schutz on Transcendental Intersubjectivity in Husserl.Peter J. Carrington - 1979 - Human Studies 2 (1):95 - 110.
    In his paper on transcendental intersubjectivity in Husserl, which refers mainly to the Fifth Cartesian Meditation, Schutz (1966a) marks out four stages in Husserl's argument and finds what are for him insurmountable problems in each stage. These stages are: (1) isolation of the primordial world of one's peculiar ownness by means of a further epoche; (2) apperception of the other via pairing; (3) constitution of objective, intersubjective Nature; (4) constitution of higher forms of community. Because of the problems Schutz encounters (...)
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  2.  51
    Orderly Decision Theory: Peter J. Hammond.Peter J. Hammond - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):292-297.
  3.  24
    What-If History of Science: Peter J. Bowler: Darwin Deleted: Imagining a World Without Darwin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, Ix+318pp, $30.00 HB.Peter J. Bowler, Robert J. Richards & Alan C. Love - 2015 - Metascience 24 (1):5-24.
    Alan C. LoveDarwinian calisthenicsAn athlete engages in calisthenics as part of basic training and as a preliminary to more advanced or intense activity. Whether it is stretching, lunges, crunches, or push-ups, routine calisthenics provide a baseline of strength and flexibility that prevent a variety of injuries that might otherwise be incurred. Peter Bowler has spent 40 years doing Darwinian calisthenics, researching and writing on the development of evolutionary ideas with special attention to Darwin and subsequent filiations among scientists exploring (...)
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  4.  42
    Quantum Ontology: A Guide to the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics.Peter J. Lewis - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Metaphysicians should pay attention to quantum mechanics. Why? Not because it provides definitive answers to many metaphysical questions-the theory itself is remarkably silent on the nature of the physical world, and the various interpretations of the theory on offer present conflicting ontological pictures. Rather, quantum mechanics is essential to the metaphysician because it reshapes standard metaphysical debates and opens up unforeseen new metaphysical possibilities. Even if quantum mechanics provides few clear answers, there are good reasons to think that any adequate (...)
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  5.  12
    Competitive Sport, Winning and Education/Peter J. Arnold.J. Arnold Peter - 1989 - Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):15-25.
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  6.  20
    Reconciling Science and Religion: THE DEBATE IN EARLY-TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN.Peter J. Bowler - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Although much has been written about the vigorous debates over science and religion in the Victorian era, little attention has been paid to their continuing importance in early twentieth-century Britain. Reconciling Science and Religion provides a comprehensive survey of the interplay between British science and religion from the late nineteenth century to World War II. Peter J. Bowler argues that unlike the United States, where a strong fundamentalist opposition to evolutionism developed in the 1920s (most famously expressed in the (...)
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  7. Why the Pessimistic Induction is a Fallacy.Peter J. Lewis - 2001 - Synthese 129 (3):371--380.
    Putnam and Laudan separately argue that the falsity of past scientific theories gives us reason to doubt the truth of current theories. Their arguments have been highly influential, and have generated a significant literature over the past couple of decades. Most of this literature attempts to defend scientific realism by attacking the historical evidence on which the premises of the relevant argument are based. However, I argue that both Putnam's and Laudan's arguments are fallacious, and hence attacking their premises is (...)
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  8.  12
    Unruly Complexity: Ecology, Interpretation, Engagement.Peter J. Taylor - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    Ambitiously identifying fresh issues in the study of complex systems, Peter J. Taylor, in a model of interdisciplinary exploration, makes these concerns accessible to scholars in the fields of ecology, environmental science, and science studies. Unruly Complexity explores concepts used to deal with complexity in three realms: ecology and socio-environmental change; the collective constitution of knowledge; and the interpretations of science as they influence subsequent research. For each realm Taylor shows that unruly complexity-situations that lack definite boundaries, where what (...)
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  9. Intelligent Design and Selective History: Two Sources of Purpose and Plan.Peter J. Graham - 2011 - In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 3. Oxford University Press. pp. 67-88.
    Alvin Plantinga argues by counterexample that no naturalistic account of functions is possible--God is then the only source for natural functions. This paper replies to Plantinga's examples and arguments. Plantinga misunderstands naturalistic accounts. Plantinga's mistakes flow from his assimilation of functional notions in general to functions from intentional design in particular.
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  10. Conspiracy Theories of Quantum Mechanics.Peter J. Lewis - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):359-381.
    It has long been recognized that a local hidden variable theory of quantum mechanics can in principle be constructed, provided one is willing to countenance pre-measurement correlations between the properties of measured systems and measuring devices. However, this ‘conspiratorial’ approach is typically dismissed out of hand. In this article I examine the justification for dismissing conspiracy theories of quantum mechanics. I consider the existing arguments against such theories, and find them to be less than conclusive. I suggest a more powerful (...)
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  11.  76
    Neural Synchrony and the Development of Cortical Networks.Peter J. Uhlhaas, Frédéric Roux, Eugenio Rodriguez, Anna Rotarska-Jagiela & Wolf Singer - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):72-80.
  12.  22
    The Changing Meaning of "Evolution".Peter J. Bowler - 1975 - Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (1):95.
  13.  10
    What Darwin Disturbed: The Biology That Might Have Been.Peter J. Bowler - 2008 - Isis 99 (3):560-567.
    The launch of a revolutionary new scientific theory represents a rare occasion on which the apparently cumulative development of science might be influenced by particular events. Yet in the case of the Darwinian revolution it is often claimed that the theory of evolution by natural selection would have emerged more or less inevitably, given the scientific and cultural circumstances prevailing in mid-Victorian Britain. This essay challenges that claim by arguing that if Darwin had not been there to write his Origin (...)
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  14. Cause and Effect: Government Policies and the Financial Crisis.Peter J. Wallison - 2009 - Critical Review 21 (2-3):365-376.
    ABSTRACT The underlying cause of the financial meltdown was much more mundane than a ?crisis of capitalism?: The real origins lay in mostly obscure housing, tax, and regulatory policies of the U.S. government. The Community Reinvestment Act, the affordable?housing ?mission? of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, penalty?free refinancing of home loans, penalty?free defaults on home loans, tax preferences for home?equity borrowing, and reduced capital requirements for banks that held mortgages and mortgage?backed securities combined with each other to create the incentives (...)
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  15. Why Ethical Consumers Don’T Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
    Despite their ethical intentions, ethically minded consumers rarely purchase ethical products (Auger and Devinney: 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 76, 361-383). This intentions-behaviour gap is important to researchers and industry, yet poorly understood (Belk et al.: 2005, Consumption, Markets and Culture 8(3), 275-289). In order to push the understanding of ethical consumption forward, we draw on what is known about the intention— behaviour gap from the social psychology and consumer behaviour literatures and apply these insights to ethical consumerism. We bring (...)
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  16.  16
    Integration After Totalitarianism: Arendt and Habermas on the Postwar Imperatives of Memory.Peter J. Verovšek - 2018 - Journal of International Political Theory 16 (1):2-24.
    Collective memories of totalitarianism and the industrialized slaughter of the Holocaust have exerted a profound influence on postwar European politics and philosophy. Two of the most prominent pol...
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  17.  24
    Enhancing Cognition in the Intellectually Intact.Peter J. Whitehouse, Eric Juengst, Maxwell Mehlman & Thomas H. Murray - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (3):14-22.
  18.  8
    Historical Criticism Without Progress: Memory as an Emancipatory Resource for Critical Theory.Peter J. Verovšek - 2019 - Constellations 26 (1):132-147.
  19.  30
    The Rebirth of Bioethics: Extending the Original Formulations of Van Rensselaer Potter.Peter J. Whitehouse - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):26 – 31.
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  20. Utilitarianism, Uncertainty and Information.Peter J. Hammond - 1982 - In Amartya Kumar Sen & Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (eds.), Utilitarianism and Beyond. Cambridge University Press. pp. 85--102.
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  21. Testimony as Speech Act, Testimony as Source.Peter J. Graham - 2015 - In Chienkuo Mi, Ernest Sosa & Michael Slote (eds.), Moral and Intellectual Virtues in Western and Chinese Philosophy: The Turn toward Virtue. Routledge. pp. 121-144.
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  22.  65
    Pictorial Representation in Biology.Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):125-134.
  23. Epistemic Entitlement.Peter J. Graham - 2012 - Noûs 46 (3):449-482.
    What is the best account of process reliabilism about epistemic justification, especially epistemic entitlement? I argue that entitlement consists in the normal functioning (proper operation) of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Etiological functions involve consequence explanation: a belief-forming process has forming true beliefs reliably as a function just in case forming-true beliefs reliably partly explains the persistence of the process. This account paves the way for avoiding standard objections to process (...)
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  24.  71
    A Critique of Mellor’s Argument Against ’Backwards’ Causation.Peter J. Riggs - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):75-86.
    In this paper, criticisms are made of the main tenets of Professor Mellor's argument against ‘backwards’ causation. He requires a closed causal chain of events if there is to be ‘backwards’ causation, but this condition is a metaphysical assumption which he cannot totally substantiate. Other objections to Mellor's argument concern his probabilistic analysis of causation, and the use to which he puts this analysis. In particular, his use of conditional probability inequality to establish the ‘direction’ of causation is shown to (...)
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  25. Building on Construction: An Exploration of Heterogeneous Constructionism, Using an Analogy From Psychology and a Sketch From Socio-Economic Modeling.Peter J. Taylor - 1995 - Perspectives on Science 3 (1):66-98.
  26. Ecosystem as Circuits: Diagrams and the Limits of Physical Analogies. [REVIEW]Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):275-294.
    Diagrams refer to the phenomena overtly represented, to analogous phenomena, and to previous pictures and their graphic conventions. The diagrams of ecologists Clarke, Hutchinson, and H.T. Odum reveal their search for physical analogies, building on the success of World War II science and the promise of cybernetics. H.T. Odum's energy circuit diagrams reveal also his aspirations for a universal and natural means of reducing complexity to guide the management of diverse ecological and social systems. Graphic conventions concerning framing and translation (...)
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  27.  27
    Against International Criminal Tribunals: Reconciling the Global Justice Norm with Local Agency.Peter J. Verovšek - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  28.  18
    The Darwin Reading Notebooks (1838-1860).Peter J. Vorzimmer - 1977 - Journal of the History of Biology 10 (1):107 - 153.
  29.  14
    Distinctions That Make a Difference?Peter J. Taylor - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 51:70-76.
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  30.  20
    Memory and the Euro‐Crisis of Leadership: The Effects of Generational Change in Germany and the EU.Peter J. Verovšek - 2014 - Constellations 21 (2):239-248.
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  31.  29
    Technocratic Optimism, H. T. Odum, and the Partial Transformation of Ecological Metaphor After World War II.Peter J. Taylor - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (2):213-244.
  32.  14
    Evolutionism in the Enlightenment.Peter J. Bowler - 1974 - History of Science 12 (3):159-183.
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  33.  23
    A Gene-Free Formulation of Classical Quantitative Genetics Used to Examine Results and Interpretations Under Three Standard Assumptions.Peter J. Taylor - 2012 - Acta Biotheoretica 60 (4):357-378.
    Quantitative genetics (QG) analyses variation in traits of humans, other animals, or plants in ways that take account of the genealogical relatedness of the individuals whose traits are observed. “Classical” QG, where the analysis of variation does not involve data on measurable genetic or environmental entities or factors, is reformulated in this article using models that are free of hypothetical, idealized versions of such factors, while still allowing for defined degrees of relatedness among kinds of individuals or “varieties.” The gene (...)
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  34. Charles Darwin: The Years of Controversy.Peter J. Vorzimmer - 1970 - Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
     
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  35.  7
    The Darwin Reading Notebooks.Peter J. Vorzimmer - 1977 - Journal of the History of Biology 10 (1):107-153.
  36.  13
    Comment: The Ability Model of Emotional Intelligence: Consistency With Intelligence Theory.Peter J. Legree, Heather M. Mullins & Joseph Psotka - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):301-302.
    Mayer, Caruso, and Salovey provide useful updates to the EI ability model and related concepts. However, they do not acknowledge conceptual limitations with the MSCEIT proportion scoring algorithm. In our view, failure to recognize these limitations has impeded refinements to the EI ability model and delayed support for positioning EI within the Cattell-Horn-Carroll three-stratum theory of intelligence. Fully appreciating algorithm-related issues justifies the reanalysis of MSCEIT data and may expand the range of metrics that are available to refine EI theory.
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  37.  6
    The Under-Recognized Implications of Heterogeneity: Opportunities for Fresh Views on Scientific, Philosophical, and Social Debates About Heritability.Peter J. Taylor - 2008 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 30 (3-4):431 - 456.
    Despite a long history of debates about the heritability of human traits by researchers and other critical commentators, the possible heterogeneity of genetic and environmental factors that underlie patterns in observed traits has not been recognized as a significant conceptual and methodological issue. This article is structured to stimulate a wide range of readers to pursue diverse implications of underlying heterogeneity and of its absence from previous debates. Section 1, a condensed critique of previous conceptualizations and interpretations of heritability studies, (...)
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  38.  15
    An Early Darwin Manuscript: The "Outline and Draft of 1839".Peter J. Vorzimmer & Charles Darwin - 1975 - Journal of the History of Biology 8 (2):191 - 217.
  39.  22
    Evolution: The History of an Idea.Peter J. Bowler - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):155-157.
  40.  13
    Credit‐Default Swaps Are Not to Blame.Peter J. Wallison - 2009 - Critical Review 21 (2-3):377-387.
    ABSTRACT Though accused by critics of helping to cause the current financial crisis, credit?default swaps are blameless. The accusation is understandable, however, given misunderstandings about how a credit?default swap actually works. A careful look into its mechanism shows that it is not only simpler than thought, but that it is also vital to keeping the financial system strong by enabling financial institutions to better manage their risks. The risk taken on in a credit?default swap (CDS) is no different from the (...)
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  41. Epistemic Normativity and Social Norms.Peter J. Graham - 2015 - In David Henderson & John Greco (eds.), Epistemic Evaluation: Purposeful Epistemology. Oxford University Press. pp. 247-273.
  42. Consequentialist Foundations for Expected Utility.Peter J. Hammond - 1988 - Theory and Decision 25 (1):25-78.
    Behaviour norms are considered for decision trees which allow both objective probabilities and uncertain states of the world with unknown probabilities. Terminal nodes have consequences in a given domain. Behaviour is required to be consistent in subtrees. Consequentialist behaviour, by definition, reveals a consequence choice function independent of the structure of the decision tree. It implies that behaviour reveals a revealed preference ordering satisfying both the independence axiom and a novel form of sure-thing principle. Continuous consequentialist behaviour must be expected (...)
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  43.  20
    A Geohistorical Study of 'The Rise of Modern Science': Mapping Scientific Practice Through Urban Networks, 1500–1900. [REVIEW]Peter J. Taylor, Michael Hoyler & David M. Evans - 2008 - Minerva 46 (4):391-410.
    Using data on the ‘career’ paths of one thousand ‘leading scientists’ from 1450 to 1900, what is conventionally called the ‘rise of modern science’ is mapped as a changing geography of scientific practice in urban networks. Four distinctive networks of scientific practice are identified. A primate network centred on Padua and central and northern Italy in the sixteenth century expands across the Alps to become a polycentric network in the seventeenth century, which in turn dissipates into a weak polycentric network (...)
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  44.  19
    Emotion, Attention, and the Startle Reflex.Peter J. Lang, Margaret M. Bradley & Bruce N. Cuthbert - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (3):377-395.
  45.  13
    Secret Science: A Classified Community in the National Laboratories. [REVIEW]Peter J. Westwick - 2000 - Minerva 38 (4):363-391.
    American scientists acceded to the imposition of secrecy in a pragmatic andpatriotic adjustment to the context of the Cold War. Scientists and managersin the national laboratory system accommodated the demands of nationalsecurity within a classified community, composed of a system of secretconferences, publications, and interlocking committees.
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  46.  7
    Social Referencing: Defining and Delineating a Basic Process of Emotion.Eric A. Walle, Peter J. Reschke & Jennifer M. Knothe - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):245-252.
    Social referencing informs and regulates one’s relation with the environment as a function of the perceived appraisals of social partners. Increased emphasis on relational and social contexts in the study of emotion makes this interpersonal process particularly relevant to the field. However, theoretical conceptualizations and empirical operationalizations of social referencing are disjointed across domains and populations of study. This article seeks to unite and refine the study of this construct by providing a clear and comprehensive definition of social referencing. Our (...)
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  47. Testimonial Entitlement and the Function of Comprehension.Peter J. Graham - 2010 - In Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar & Adrian Haddock (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 148--174.
    This paper argues for the general proper functionalist view that epistemic warrant consists in the normal functioning of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Such a process is reliable in normal conditions when functioning normally. This paper applies this view to so-called testimony-based beliefs. It argues that when a hearer forms a comprehension-based belief that P (a belief based on taking another to have asserted that P) through the exercise of a (...)
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  48.  27
    The Eclipse of Darwinism: Anti-Darwinian Evolution Theories in the Decades Around 1900.Peter J. Bowler - 1984 - Journal of the History of Biology 17 (3):433-434.
  49.  1
    The Ecomedical Disconnection Syndrome.Peter J. Whitehouse - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (1):41-44.
  50.  50
    Ethical Distance in Corrupt Firms: How Do Innocent Bystanders Become Guilty Perpetrators?Stelios C. Zyglidopoulos & Peter J. Fleming - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):265-274.
    This paper develops the concept of the ‘continuum of destructiveness’ in relation to organizational corruption. This notion captures the slippery slope of wrongdoing as actors engage in increasingly dubious practices. We identify four kinds of individuals along this continuum in corrupt organizations, who range from complete innocence to total guilt. They are innocent bystanders, innocent participants, active rationalizers and guilty perpetrators. Traditional explanations of how individuals move from bystander status to guilty perpetrators usually focus on socialization and institutional factors. In (...)
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