103 found
Order:
See also
Peter R. King
Nottingham University (PhD)
Peter J. King
Oxford University
  1.  46
    B. Dainton: The Phenomenal Self. [REVIEW]Peter R. King - 2009 - Erkenntnis 71 (2):283-288.
  2. No Plaything: Ethical Issues Concerning Child-Pornography.Peter J. King - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):327-345.
    Academic discussion of pornography is generally restricted to issues arising from the depiction of adults. I argue that child-pornography is a more complex matter, and that generally accepted moral judgements concerning pornography in general have to be revised when children are involved. I look at the question of harm to the children involved, the consumers, and society in general, at the question of blame, and at the possibility of a morally acceptable form of child-pornography. My approach involves an objectivist meta-ethics (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  61
    Two Conceptions of Experience.Peter King - 2003 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 11 (2):203-226.
  4.  71
    Thinking About Things: Singular Thought in the Middle Ages.Peter King - manuscript
    In one corner Socrates; in the other, on the mat, his cat Felix. Socrates, of course, thinks (correctly) that Felix the Cat is on the mat. But there’s the rub. For Socrates to think that Felix is on the mat, he has to be able to think about Felix, that is, he has to have some sort of cognitive grasp of an individual — and not just any individual, but Felix himself. How is that possible? What is going on when (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5.  40
    Abelard's Answers to Porphyry.Peter King - 2007 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 18:249-270.
    Abelardo eredita dall'Isagoge di Porfirio una questione filosofica fondamentale, relativa al problema degli universali, posto al centro della metafisica. Abelardo si pone subito fuori da questa linea interpretativa. L'A. esamina le risposte di Abelardo ai quattro quesiti di Porfirio formulati all'inizio dell'Isagoge punto per punto, attraverso l'esame di Dialectica, Logica «Ingredientibus» nella parte relativa al commento all'Isagoge, in rapporto con il Commentarius maior in Isagogen Porphyrii di Boezio, la Logica «Nostrorum petitioni sociorum», le Introductiones parvulorum, tentando di spodestare la metafisica (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Augustine on Testimony.Peter King & Nathan Ballantyne - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 195-214.
    Philosophical work on testimony has flourished in recent years. Testimony roughly involves a source affirming or stating something in an attempt to transfer information to one or more persons. It is often said that the topic of testimony has been neglected throughout most of the history of philosophy, aside from contributions by David Hume (1711–1776) and Thomas Reid (1710–1796).1 True as this may be, Hume and Reid aren’t the only ones who deserve a tip of the hat for recognizing the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  9
    1 Scotus on Metaphysics.Peter King - 2003 - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. Cambridge University Press. pp. 15.
  8. The Inner Cathedral: Mental Architecture in High Scholasticism.Peter King - 2008 - Vivarium 46 (3):253-274.
    Mediaeval psychological theory was a “faculty psychology”: a confederation of semiautonomous sub-personal agents, the interaction of which constitutes our psychological experience. One such faculty was intellective appetite, that is, the will. On what grounds was the will taken to be a distinct faculty? After a brief survey of Aristotle's criteria for identifying and distinguishing mental faculties, I look in some detail at the mainstream mediaeval view, given clear expression by Thomas Aquinas, and then at the dissenting views of John Duns (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Mediaeval Intentionality and Pseudo-Intentionality.Peter King - 2010 - Quaestio 10:25-44.
    Wilfrid Sellars charged that mediaeval philosophers confused the genuine intentionality of thinking with what he called the “pseudo-intentionality” of sensing. I argue that Sellars’s charge rests on importing a form of mind/body dualism that was foreign to the Middle Ages, but that he does touch on a genuine difficulty for mediaeval theories, namely whether they have the conceptual resources to distinguish between intentionality as a feature of consciousness and mere discriminative responses to the environment. In the end, it seems, intentionality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Scotus's Rejection of Anselm.Peter King - unknown
    stance, Scotus adopts Anselm’s notion of a ‘(pure) perfection’ and elevates it to a fundamental principle of his metaphysics. Again, he distills Anselm’s Ontological Argument into something like its original Monologion components, and then treats each component part of the argument with a rigor and attention to detail far beyond anything Anselm suggested. In the case of Anselm’s so-called ‘two-wills’ theory, however, Scotus’s revisions are so extensive that they amount to a rejection of Anselm’s account, even though Scotus retains some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Abelard's Intentionalist Ethics.Peter King - 1995 - Modern Schoolman 72 (2-3):213-231.
  12. Why Isn't the Mind-Body Problem Medieval?Peter King - 2005 - In Forming the Mind. Springer Verlag.
    One answer: Because medieval philosophy is just the continuation of ancient philosophy by other means—the Latin language and the Catholic Church— and, as Wallace Matson pointed out some time ago, the mind-body problem isn’t ancient.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  46
    Augustine on the Impossibility of Teaching.Peter King - 1998 - Metaphilosophy 29 (3):179-195.
  14. The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.Peter King - unknown
    [1] In twelve quite demanding chapters, outstanding scholars provide an overall view of the key issues of Scotus’s philosophical thought. To this a very concise introduction is added, concerning the life and works of John Duns (very good, especially the survey of works and the information on critical editions etc.). Throughout the book, I find the information clear and the difficult topics well explained. Moreover, the volume gives a quick entrance to the vast literature. Among the topics discussed are: ‘Metaphysics’ (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  66
    Augustine’s Encounter with Neoplatonism.Peter King - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 82 (3):213-226.
  16. From Intellectus Verus/Falsus to the Dictum Propositionis: The Semantics of Peter Abelard and His Circle.Klaus Jacobi, Christian Strub & Peter King - 1996 - Vivarium 34 (1):15-40.
    In his commentary on Aristotle’s Peri hermeneias,1 Abelard distinguishes the form of an expression2 (oratio) from what it says, that is, its content. The content of an expression is its understanding (intellectus). This distinction is surely the most well-known and central idea in Abelard’s commentary. It provides him with the opportunity to distinguish statements (enuntiationes) from other kinds of expressions without implying a diference in their content, since the ability of a statement to signify something true or false (verum vel (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  94
    Abelard on Mental Language.Peter King - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):169-187.
    I argue that Abelard was the author of the first theory of mental language in the Middle Ages, devising a “language of thought” to provide the semantics for ordinary languages, based on the idea that thoughts have linguistic character. I examine Abelard’s semantic framework with special attention to his principle of compositionality (the meaning of a whole is a function of the meanings of the parts); the results are then applied to Abelard’s distinction between complete and incomplete expressions, as well (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  48
    Jean Buridan's Philosophy of Science.Peter King - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):109.
    introduced the concept of effective demand in the nascent science of economics; his discussions of astronomy were acute enough to raise Duhem’s interest. Neither are Buridan’s credentials as a nominalist in doubt, although investigation into his precise relation to William of Ockham continues: he rejected all abstract entities, whether universals, common natures, the complexe significabile, or types above and beyond tokens; for Buridan, every thing which exists is a concrete individual. His anti-realism included an epistemological component as well, for Buridan (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  58
    Duns Scotus on the Common Nature and the Individual Differentia.Peter King - 1992 - Philosophical Topics 20 (2):51-76.
  20.  34
    Thomas Hobbes's Children.Peter King - unknown
    Children therefore, whether they be brought up and preserved by the father, or by the mother, or by whomsoever, are in most absolute subjection to him or her, that so bringeth them up, or preserveth them. And they may alienate them, that is, assign his or her dominion, by selling, or giving them, in adoption or servitude to others; or may pawn them for hostages, kill them for rebellion, or sacrifice them for peace, by the law of nature, when he (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  35
    Le rôle des concepts selon Ockham.Peter King - 2005 - Philosophiques 32 (2):435-447.
    Philosophiques 32 (2005), 435-447. [An English version is available here.].
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  54
    Emotion in Medieval Thought.Peter King - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
  23. Jean Buridan's Logic the Treatise on Supposition, the Treatise on Consequences.Jean Buridan & Peter King - 1985
  24. Duns Scotus on Singular Essences.Peter King - 2005 - Medioevo 30:111-137.
    Socrates, for example, has an essence that includes more than his human nature, which is his specific essence; he has an essence proper to himself alone, an essence that cannot be had by anyone else. Although Socrates does have singular (individualized) forms, his singular essence is not a form—there is no form Socrateity for the singular essence parallelling the form humanity for the specific essence. Instead, Socrates has his singular essence in consequence of being an individual, that is, in consequence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  36
    John Buridan’s Solution to the Problem of Universals.Peter King - 2001 - In J. M. M. H. Thijssen & Jack Zupko (eds.), The Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy of John Buridan. Brill. pp. 1-28.
  26.  68
    Angelic Sin in Augustine and Anselm.Peter King - unknown
    Augustine and Anselm form a common tradition in mediæval thought about angelic sin, a tradition rooted in patristic thought and centred on their attempts to give a philosophically coherent account of moral choice. Augustine concentrates on the reasons and causes of angelic sin, especially in reference to free will; Anselm adopts Augustine’s analysis and extends it to issues about the rationality of sinful choice. Each takes Lucifer’s primal sin to be the paradigm case. Lucifer, undistracted by bodily desires and unencumbered (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  12
    Introduction to Medieval Logic.Peter King - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):299.
  28. The Life of John Locke with Extracts From His Correspondence, Journals, and Common-Place Books.Peter King King & John Locke - 1991
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29.  54
    The Problem of Individuation in the Middle Ages.Peter King - 2000 - Theoria 66 (2):159-184.
  30. Aquinas on the Passions.Peter King - 2002 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oup Usa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  93
    Damaged Goods.Peter King - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):247-267.
    The Doctrine of Original Sin seems to require that human nature has literally undergone a change from its prelapsarian to its postlapsarian condition.It is not clear that this claim makes sense. How can human nature, the feature(s) in virtue of which human beings are what they are, change in time? (Think of the parallel claim about √2.) I consider three medieval attempts to resolve this problem: (1) Augustine’s two theories about shared human nature; (2) Anselm’s proposal that original sin is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Parapsychology Without the 'Para' (or the Psychology).Peter J. King - 2003 - Think 1 (3):43-54.
    possible, your investigation is unlikely ever to get off the ground), there’s no such excuse for philosophers. The philosopher should be unrestricted by fashions in thought, including the unquestioning acceptance of whatever scientific theories are currently dominant. The fact is, however, that in this field and in the philosophy of mind, many.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  8
    Dispassionate Passions.Peter King - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 9.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  14
    Late Scholastic Theories of the Passions: Controversies in the Thomist Tradition.Peter King - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 229--258.
  35. Body and Soul.Peter King - 2011 - In John Marenbon (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Medieval Philosophy. Oxford Up.
  36.  65
    Lycan on Lewis and Meinong.Peter J. King - 1992 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:193 - 201.
    In his 1988 review of On the Plurality of Worlds (Lycan [1988]), William Lycan argued that what he called Lewis's 'mad-dog modal realism' (also 'rape-and-loot modal realism' and 'nuclear-holocaust modal realism' - I suspect that some reference to the supposed extremity of Lewis's position is intended) rested upon an unanalysed modal notion. Lycan accepted that actualists all seemed to be stuck with such unanalysed notions (adding that his own was the notion of compatibility as applied to pairs of properties), but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Emotions.Peter King - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  98
    The History of Logic.Peter King - manuscript
    Aristotle was the first thinker to devise a logical system. He drew upon the emphasis on universal definition found in Socrates, the use of reductio ad absurdum in Zeno of Elea, claims about propositional structure and negation in Parmenides and Plato, and the body of argumentative techniques found in legal reasoning and geometrical proof. Yet the theory presented in Aristotle’s five treatises known as the Organon—the Categories, the De interpretatione, the Prior Analytics, the Posterior Analytics, and the Sophistical Refutations—goes far (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  13
    Introduction to the Problem of Individuation in the Early Middle Ages.Peter King & Jorge J. E. Gracia - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (4):564.
  40. Duns Scotus on Possibilities, Powers, and the Possible.Peter King - 2001 - In Potentialitã¤T Und Possibilitã¤T. Fromann-Holzboog. pp. 175-199.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  76
    Perception, Hallucination, and Illusion.Peter R. King - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):715-719.
  42.  89
    Did Marx Hold a Labor Theory of Value?Peter King - unknown
    In the first volume of Capital, Marx introduces a labor theory of value. The theory is supposed to form the basis of his “laying bare” the “inner workings” of capitalism. The theory rests on two claims, and at the outset Marx uses it to explain four features of capitalist production. Yet by the end of the final volume of Capital, he abandons both claims and offers alternative accounts of all four features of capitalism. We hold that Marx’s introduction of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  72
    Siger of Brabant: The Eternity of the World.Peter King - unknown
    phers] to be a demonstration of the fact that the human species (and in every case the species of all generable and corruptible individuals) began to exist at a time when previously it had not existed at all, a question is raised: whether, following the Philosopher’s method, the human species (and in every case any given species of generable and corruptible [individuals]) began to exist at a time when previously it had not existed at all.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  7
    Ockham's Ethical Theory'.Peter King - 1999 - In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 227--44.
  45.  60
    William of Ockham: Ordinatio 1 D. 2 Q.Peter King - unknown
    That it is: According to the Commentator, Met. 7 com. 11 ([Iuntina 8 fol. 76r]): The definition is the same as the substance of the thing. Hence it is in some way outside the soul, and consequently all its parts are in some way outside the soul. But the definition is composed of universals. Hence [the universal is outside the soul].
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  66
    Buridan's Theory of Individuation.Peter King - 1994 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia (ed.), Individuation in Scholasticism. The Later Middle Ages and the Counter-Reformation, 1150-1650. pp. 397-430.
    cause other than the very individual itself, and thus there is no ‘metaphysical’ problem of individuation at all—individuality, unlike generality, is primitive and needs no explanation. He supports this view in two ways. First, he argues that there are no nonindividual entities, whether existing in their own right or as metaphysical constituents either of things or in things, and hence that no real principle or cause of individuality (other than the individual itself) is required. Second, he offers a ‘semantic’ interpretation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  26
    Other Times.Peter J. King - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4):532 – 547.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  12
    Peter Abelard.Peter King - 1992 - In The Dictionary of Literary Biography. pp. 3-14.
  49.  6
    Lycan on Lewis and Meinong.Peter J. King - 1993 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93 (1):193-202.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  56
    Boethius: The First of the Scholastics.Peter King - 2007 - Carmina Philosophiae 16:23-50.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 103