4 found
Order:
  1. Intellectual Humility: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Science.Ian M. Church & Peter L. Samuelson - 2017 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    Two intellectual vices seem to always tempt us: arrogance and diffidence. Regarding the former, the world is permeated by dogmatism and table-thumping close-mindedness. From politics, to religion, to simple matters of taste, zealots and ideologues all too often define our disagreements, often making debate and dialogue completely intractable. But to the other extreme, given a world with so much pluralism and heated disagreement, intellectual apathy and a prevailing agnosticism can be simply all too alluring. So the need for intellectual humility, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  80
    Implicit Theories of Intellectual Virtues and Vices: A Focus on Intellectual Humility.Peter L. Samuelson, Matthew J. Jarvinen, Thomas B. Paulus, Ian M. Church, Sam A. Hardy & Justin L. Barrett - 2014 - Journal of Positive Psychology 5 (10):389-406.
    The study of intellectual humility is still in its early stages and issues of definition and measurement are only now being explored. To inform and guide the process of defining and measuring this important intellectual virtue, we conducted a series of studies into the implicit theory – or ‘folk’ understanding – of an intellectually humble person, a wise person, and an intellectually arrogant person. In Study 1, 350 adults used a free-listing procedure to generate a list of descriptors, one for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3. When Cognition Turns Vicious: Heuristics and Biases in Light of Virtue Epistemology.Peter L. Samuelson & Ian M. Church - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (8):1095-1113.
    In this paper, we explore the literature on cognitive heuristics and biases in light of virtue epistemology, specifically highlighting the two major positions—agent-reliabilism and agent-responsibilism —as they apply to dual systems theories of cognition and the role of motivation in biases. We investigate under which conditions heuristics and biases might be characterized as vicious and conclude that a certain kind of intellectual arrogance can be attributed to an inappropriate reliance on Type 1, or the improper function of Type 2, cognitive (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  20
    Shelter: Where Harvard Meets the Homeless.Peter L. Samuelson - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (4):535-537.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark