4 found
Order:
  1.  19
    Max Horkheimer: A New Interpretation.Peter M. R. Stirk - 1992 - Barnes & Noble.
    Introduction Max Horkheimer was born on February in Stuttgart. By the time he died, on 7 July in Nuremberg, he had played a decisive role in launching and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  26
    Carl Schmitt's Enemy and the Rhetoric of Anti-Interventionism.Peter M. R. Stirk - 2003 - The European Legacy 8 (1):21-36.
    This article explores Carl Schmitt's concept of the enemy against the backcloth of the international agenda from the 1920s into the Second World War. More specifically it argues for his abiding antipathy to the Anglo-Saxon powers. It identifies his concern with the right of intervention and his strategies for deflecting claims of a right of intervention in the affairs of states. It also explores the tension between his concept of domestic order and international order in the late 1930s and suggests (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  32
    Eros and Civilization Revisited.Peter M. R. Stirk - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (1):73-90.
    The article consists of a re-examination of Marcuse’s Eros and Civilization in the light of continuing interest in that work. After a brief consideration of Marcuse’s attempt to use Freud to indict contemporary civilization, focusing on the concepts of surplus repression and guilt, the article turns to his utopian sketch of Eros as a culture builder and the reconciliation of reason and instinct. These themes, which form the focus of recent interest, are explored by examining Marcuse’s interpretation of Kant and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  5
    The Development of Post-War German Social and Political Thought.Peter M. R. Stirk - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (1):19-34.
    Summary The development of post-war German social sciences is marked by a series of disputes about the nature and implications of positivist methodology. Two of these are selected for consideration here; the ?positivist dispute? in German sociology associated with Adorno and Popper, and the more diffuse assault on positivism in the legal sciences. In both cases, self-avowed positivists were in fact hard to find but the debates were important polemical disputes about the past?notably the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich?and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark