Results for 'Peter M. Smudde'

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  1. Humanistic Critique of Education: Teaching and Learning as Symbolic Action.Peter M. Smudde (ed.) - 2010 - Parlor Press.
  2.  44
    The Intellectual Powers: A Study of Human Nature.Peter M. S. Hacker - 2013 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Intellectual Powers_ is a philosophical investigation into the cognitive and cogitative powers of mankind. It develops a connective analysis of our powers of consciousness, intentionality, mastery of language, knowledge, belief, certainty, sensation, perception, memory, thought, and imagination, by one of Britain’s leading philosophers. It is an essential guide and handbook for philosophers, psychologists, and cognitive neuroscientists. The culmination of 45 years of reflection on the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and the nature of the human person No other book in (...)
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  3. Newman's Objection.Peter M. Ainsworth - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (1):135-171.
    This paper is a review of work on Newman's objection to epistemic structural realism (ESR). In Section 2, a brief statement of ESR is provided. In Section 3, Newman's objection and its recent variants are outlined. In Section 4, two responses that argue that the objection can be evaded by abandoning the Ramsey-sentence approach to ESR are considered. In Section 5, three responses that have been put forward specifically to rescue the Ramsey-sentence approach to ESR from the modern versions of (...)
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  4. Précis of Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart.Peter M. Todd & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):727-741.
    How can anyone be rational in a world where knowledge is limited, time is pressing, and deep thought is often an unattainable luxury? Traditional models of unbounded rationality and optimization in cognitive science, economics, and animal behavior have tended to view decision-makers as possessing supernatural powers of reason, limitless knowledge, and endless time. But understanding decisions in the real world requires a more psychologically plausible notion of bounded rationality. In Simple heuristics that make us smart (Gigerenzer et al. 1999), we (...)
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  5. Understanding Curriculum: An Introduction to the Study of Historical and Contemporary Curriculum Discourses (William Pinar, William M. Reynolds, Patrick Slattery and Peter M. Taubman). [REVIEW]M. Peters - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31:254-258.
     
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  6. What Should We Want From a Robot Ethic.Peter M. Asaro - 2006 - International Review of Information Ethics 6 (12):9-16.
    There are at least three things we might mean by "ethics in robotics": the ethical systems built into robots, the ethics of people who design and use robots, and the ethics of how people treat robots. This paper argues that the best approach to robot ethics is one which addresses all three of these, and to do this it ought to consider robots as socio-technical systems. By so doing, it is possible to think of a continuum of agency that lies (...)
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  7.  24
    Environments That Make Us Smart Ecological Rationality.Peter M. Todd & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2007 - Current Directions in Psychological Science 16 (3):167-171.
    Traditional views of rationality posit general-purpose decision mechanisms based on logic or optimization. The study of ecological rationality focuses on uncovering the “adaptive toolbox” of domain-specific simple heuristics that real, computationally bounded minds employ, and explaining how these heuristics produce accurate decisions by exploiting the structures of information in the environments in which they are applied. Knowing when and how people use particular heuristics can facilitate the shaping of environments to engender better decisions.
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  8. Appearance and Reality: A Philosophical Investigation Into Perception and Perceptual Qualities.PETER M. S. HACKER - 1987 - Cambridge: Blackwell.
  9.  98
    Wittgenstein on Grammar, Theses and Dogmatism.Peter M. S. Hacker - 2012 - Philosophical Investigations 35 (1):1-17.
    It is sometimes argued that Wittgenstein's conception of grammar and the role he allocated to grammar (in his sense of the term) in philosophy changed between the Big Typescript and the Philosophical Investigations. It is also held that some of the grammatical propositions Wittgenstein asserted prior to his writing of the Philosophical Investigations are theses, doctrines, opinions or dogmatism, which he abandoned by 1936/37. The purpose of this paper is to show these claims to be misunderstandings and misinterpretations. On all (...)
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  10. Appearance and Reality: A Philosophical Investigation Into Perception and Perceptual Qualities.PETER M. S. HACKER - 1987 - Philosophy 64 (247):116-119.
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  11. Identity Theories of Truth and the Tractatus.Peter M. Sullivan - 2005 - Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):43–62.
    The paper is concerned with the idea that the world is the totality of facts, not of things – with what is involved in thinking of the world in that way, and why one might do so. It approaches this issue through a comparison between Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and the identity theory of truth proposed by Hornsby and McDowell.The paper’s positive conclusion is that there is a genuine affinity between these two. A negative contention is that the modern identity theory is (...)
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  12.  97
    Farewell to Substance: A Differentiated Leave-Taking.Peter M. Simons - 1998 - Ratio 11 (3):235–252.
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  13. On Trying to Be Resolute: A Response to Kremer on the Tractatus.Peter M. Sullivan - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):43-78.
    A way of reading the Tractatus has been proposed which, according to its advocates, is importantly novel and essentially distinct from anything to be found in the work of such previously influential students of the book as Anscombe, Stenius, Hacker or Pears. The point of difference is differently described, but the currently most used description seems to be Goldfarb’s term ‘resolution’ – hence one speaks of ‘the resolute reading’. I’ll shortly ask what resolution is. For now, it is enough that (...)
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  14.  37
    Building the Theory of Ecological Rationality.Peter M. Todd & Henry Brighton - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (1-2):9-30.
    While theories of rationality and decision making typically adopt either a single-powertool perspective or a bag-of-tricks mentality, the research program of ecological rationality bridges these with a theoretically-driven account of when different heuristic decision mechanisms will work well. Here we described two ways to study how heuristics match their ecological setting: The bottom-up approach starts with psychologically plausible building blocks that are combined to create simple heuristics that fit specific environments. The top-down approach starts from the statistical problem facing the (...)
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  15.  10
    A Model for Visual Shape Recognition.Peter M. Milner - 1974 - Psychological Review 81 (6):521-535.
  16. Conditionalization and Expected Utility.Peter M. Brown - 1976 - Philosophy of Science 43 (3):415-419.
  17.  93
    The General Propositional Form is a Variable’.Peter M. Sullivan - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):43-56.
    Wittgenstein presents in the Tractatus a variable purporting to capture the general form of proposition. One understanding of what Wittgenstein is doing there, an understanding in line with the ‘new’ reading of his work championed by Diamond, Conant and others, sees it as a deflationary or even an implosive move—a move by which a concept sometimes put by philosophers to distinctively metaphysical use is replaced, in a perspicuous notation, by an innocent device of generalization, thereby dispersing the clouds of philosophy (...)
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  18. Frege's Logic.Peter M. Sullivan - 2004 - In Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.), Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier. pp. 659-750.
  19. The Control of the Unwanted.Peter M. Gollwitzer, Ute C. Bayer & Kathleen C. McCulloch - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 485--515.
  20. What is the Tractatus About?Peter M. Sullivan - 2004 - In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge. pp. 28-41.
     
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  21.  19
    The Use of Usus and the Function of Functio: Teleology and Its Limits in Descartes’s Physiology.Peter M. Distelzweig - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (3):377-399.
    rené descartes famously and explicitly rejects appeals to final causes in natural philosophy, suggesting that such appeals depend on knowledge of God’s inscrutable ends.For since I now know that my own nature is very weak and limited, whereas the nature of God is immense, incomprehensible and infinite, I also know without more ado that he is capable of countless things whose causes are beyond my knowledge. And for this reason alone I consider the whole kind of causes, customarily sought from (...)
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  22. The Totality of Facts.Peter M. Sullivan - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):175–192.
    Wittgenstein, in the Tractatus, conceives the world as ‘the totality of facts’. Type-stratification threatens that conception : the totality of facts is an obvious example of an illegitimate totality. Wittgenstein’s notion of truthoperation evidently has some role to play in avoiding that threat, allowing propositions, and so facts, to constitute a single type. The paper seeks to explain that role in a way that integrates the ‘philosophical’ and ‘technical’ pressures on the notion of an operation.
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  23.  73
    Token resistance.Peter M. Simons - 1982 - Analysis 42 (4):195.
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  24.  62
    The Evolutionary Psychology of Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Are There Universal Adaptations in Search, Aversion, and Signaling?Peter M. Todd & Geoffrey F. Miller - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (2):131-141.
    To understand the possible forms of extraterrestrial intelligence, we need not only astrobiology theories about how life evolves given habitable planets, but also evolutionary psychology theories about how intelligence emerges given life. Wherever intelligent organisms evolve, they are likely to face similar behavioral challenges in their physical and social worlds. The cognitive mechanisms that arise to meet these challenges may then be copied, repurposed, and shaped by further evolutionary selection to deal with more abstract, higher-level cognitive tasks such as conceptual (...)
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  25.  17
    ‘The Value of the Inexact’: An Apology for Inaccurate Motor Performance.Peter M. Hopsicker - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):65-83.
    Philosophic inquiry into the mental states of elite athletes during skilled motor performance continues to grow. In contrast to the bulk of these works that focus almost exclusively on skillful performance, this paper examines athletic motor behavior from a point of inexactness ? or even failure ? in athletic performance. Utilizing the works of Michael Polanyi, who believed that both ideas of achievement and failure were equally necessary to understand the behavior of living things and their physical actions, I examine (...)
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  26. Frege: Importance and Legacy. [REVIEW]Peter M. Sullivan - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (4):648.
    Nine of the papers collected here derive directly from a conference organized by Schirn in Munich in 1991. Seven others, three of them reprinted, have been intelligently chosen to complement the original nine. The collection has no overarching theme, nor is it dominated by any particular approach to Frege’s thought. It is “a mixed selection”, and aims to reflect “the prevailing tendency in current Frege scholarship”. The influence of Dreben is less in evidence than one might expect, but otherwise the (...)
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  27.  33
    The Denotation of Generic Terms in Ancient Indian Philosophy: Grammar, Nyāya and Mīmāṃsā.Peter M. Scharf - 1996 - American Philosophical Society.
    Introduction By the late fifth century BCE Panini had composed the Astadhyayi, consisting of nearly 4000 rules giving a precise and fairly complete ...
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  28.  91
    Brentano's Reform of Logic.Peter M. Simons - 1987 - Topoi 6 (1):25-38.
  29.  29
    A Stakeholder–Human Capital Perspective on the Link Between Social Performance and Executive Compensation.Peter M. Madsen & John B. Bingham - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):1-30.
    The link between firm corporate social performance and executive compensation could be driven by a sorting effect , or by an incentive effect . Existing empirical work focuses exclusively on the incentive effect. In contrast, in this paper we explore the sorting effect of firm CSP on the initial compensation of newly hired executives. In doing so, we develop a novel theoretical approach based on an integration of stakeholder theory and human capital theory, suggesting a positive association between the initial (...)
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  30.  47
    Husserl and Frege. [REVIEW]Peter M. Simons - 1984 - Philosophical Quarterly 34 (136):420.
  31.  15
    A Simple Computational Theory of General Collective Intelligence.Peter M. Krafft - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (2):374-392.
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  32. De Veritate: Austro-Polish Contributions to the Theory of Truth From Brentano to Tarski.Peter M. Simons & Jan Wolenski - 1989 - In Klemens Szaniawski (ed.), The Vienna Circle and the Lvov-Warsaw School. Dordrecht.
  33.  38
    The Intersection of the Mathematical and Natural Sciences: The Subordinate Sciences in Aristotle.Peter M. Distelzweig - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (2):85 - 105.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  34.  2
    Contrast Sensitivity Is a Significant Predictor of Performance in Rifle Shooting for Athletes With Vision Impairment.Peter M. Allen, Rianne H. J. C. Ravensbergen, Keziah Latham, Amy Rose, Joy Myint & David L. Mann - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  35.  22
    The Context of the Phenomenological Movement.Peter M. Simons - 1984 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (3):426-428.
  36.  53
    On Understanding Leśniewski.Peter M. Simons - 1982 - History and Philosophy of Logic 3 (2):165-191.
    This paper assesses those features of Lesniewski's Ontology which make it difficult to understand for logicians accustomed to more orthodox systems of logic. It is seen that certain general features of presentation and content can, by selective acceptance or modification, be accommodated with a fairly orthodox viewpoint. The chief difficulty lies in the interpretation of Le?niewski's names, and the constant ???. Four interpretations are suggested in turn: Le?niewski's names as monadic predicates; as class terms; as common nouns; and as empty, (...)
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  37.  39
    Me and Mine.Peter M. Jaworski & David Shoemaker - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (1):1-22.
    In this paper we articulate and diagnose a previously unrecognized problem for theories of entitlement, what we call the Claims Conundrum. It applies to all entitlements that are originally generated by some claim-generating action, such as laboring, promising, or contract-signing. The Conundrum is spurred by the very plausible thought that a later claim to the object to which one is entitled is a function of whether that original claim-generating action is attributable to one. This is further assumed to depend on (...)
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  38.  9
    The Totality of Facts.Peter M. Sullivan - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):175-192.
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  39.  27
    Soames' History of Analytic Philosophy.Peter M. S. Hacker - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):121-131.
    This critical review of Soames's history of analytic philosophy evaluates Soames's enterprise by reference to the degree to which it achieves his goals of (i) providing an overview of analytic philosophy 1900-75, (ii) explaining what the most important analytic philosophers thought, (iii) selecting some of the most important works of each philosopher for discussion, and (iv) properly evaluating the developments of the period. On all counts Soames's history is found sorely wanting. The overview it offers is riddled with distortion, its (...)
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  40.  68
    The Functional Model of Sentential Complexity.Peter M. Sullivan - 1992 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 21 (1):91 - 108.
  41.  82
    Frege's Theory of Real Numbers.Peter M. Simons - 1987 - History and Philosophy of Logic 8 (1):25--44.
    Frege's theory of real numbers has undeservedly received almost no attention, in part because what we have is only a fragment. Yet his theory is interesting for the light it throws on logicism, and it is quite different from standard modern approaches. Frege polemicizes vigorously against his contemporaries, sketches the main features of his own radical alternative, and begins the formal development. This paper summarizes and expounds what he has to say, and goes on to reconstruct the most important steps (...)
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  42.  11
    Husserl and Frege.Peter M. Simons - 1982 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 40 (2):300-302.
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  43. The 'Truth' in Solipsism, and Wittgenstein's Rejection of the A Priori.Peter M. Sullivan - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):195-220.
  44.  28
    A Semantics for Ontology.Peter M. Simons - 1985 - Dialectica 39 (3):193-215.
    SummaryLeśniewski presented his logical systems in a way which conformed to his nominalism, so the question arises whether Leśniewski's logic can be given a natural formal semantics which, unlike current versions, avoids commitment to abstract entities. Building on hints in Wittgenstein's Tractatus, I develop the idea of a way of meaning which is the basis for what I call combinatorial semantics. I then consider whether this commits us to abstract objects or an intensional metalogic.
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  45.  43
    Shepard's Mirrors or Simon 's Scissors?Peter M. Todd & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):704-705.
    Shepard promotes the important view that evolution constructs cognitive mechanisms that work with internalized aspects of the structure of their environment. But what can this internalization mean? We contrast three views: Shepard's mirrors reflecting the world, Brunswik's lens inferring the world, and Simon 's scissors exploiting the world. We argue that Simon 's scissors metaphor is more appropriate for higher-order cognitive mechanisms and ask how far it can also be applied to perceptual tasks. [Barlow; Kubovy & Epstein; Shepard].
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  46. Free Part-Whole Theory.Peter M. Simons - 1991 - In Karel Lambert (ed.), Philosophical Applications of Free Logic. Oxford University Press. pp. 285--306.
     
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  47.  19
    Max Horkheimer: A New Interpretation.Peter M. R. Stirk - 1992 - Barnes & Noble.
    Introduction Max Horkheimer was born on February in Stuttgart. By the time he died, on 7 July in Nuremberg, he had played a decisive role in launching and ...
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  48.  18
    A Constructive Look at Generalised Cauchy Reals.Peter M. Schuster - 2000 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 46 (1):125-134.
    We investigate how nonstandard reals can be established constructively as arbitrary infinite sequences of rationals, following the classical approach due to Schmieden and Laugwitz. In particular, a total standard part map into Richman's generalised Dedekind reals is constructed without countable choice.
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  49.  96
    Simplicity and Analysis in Early Wittgenstein.Peter M. Sullivan - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):72–88.
    But logic as it stands, e.g. in Principia Mathematica, can quite well be applied to our ordinary propositions; e.g. from ‘All men are mortal’ and ‘Socrates is a man’ there follows according to this logic ‘Socrates is mortal’, which is obviously correct, even though I equally obviously do not know what structure is possessed by the thing Socrates or the property of mortality. Here they just function as simple objects.
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  50.  17
    Models of Attitude-Behavior Relations.Peter M. Bentler & George Speckart - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (5):452-464.
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