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Peter Mitchell [18]Peter Chalmers Mitchell [3]
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Peter Mitchell
Bristol University
  1.  13
    Children's Early Understanding of False Belief.Peter Mitchell & Hazel Lacohée - 1991 - Cognition 39 (2):107-127.
  2.  21
    Six-Year-Olds' Difficulties Handling Intensional Contexts.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell & David Wood - 2003 - Cognition 87 (2):73-99.
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  3.  22
    Opacity and Discourse Referents: Object Identity and Object Properties.Manuel Sprung, Josef Perner & Peter Mitchell - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (3):215–245.
    It has been found that children appreciate the limited substitutability of co-referential terms in opaque contexts a year or two after they pass false belief tasks (e.g. Apperly and Robinson, 1998, 2001, 2003). This paper aims to explain this delay. Three- to six-year-old children were tested with stories where a protagonist was either only partially informed or had a false belief about a particular object. Only a few children had problems predicting the protagonist’s action based on his partial knowledge, when (...)
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  4. Children's Early Understanding of Mind Origins and Development.Charlie Lewis & Peter Mitchell - 1994
  5.  12
    Realism and Children's Early Grasp of Mental Representation: Belief-Based Judgements in the State Change Task.Rebecca Saltmarsh, Peter Mitchell & Elizabeth Robinson - 1995 - Cognition 57 (3):297-325.
  6.  16
    Shape Constancy and Theory of Mind: Is There a Link?Peter Mitchell & Laura M. Taylor - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):167-190.
  7. Introduction to Theory of Mind Children, Autism, and Apes.Peter Mitchell - 1997
  8.  39
    How Do Young Children Process Beliefs About Beliefs?: Evidence From Response Latency.Haruo Kikuno, Peter Mitchell & Fenja Ziegler - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (3):297–316.
    Are incorrect judgments on false belief tasks better explained within the framework of a conceptual change theory or a bias theory? Conceptual change theory posits a change in the form of reasoning from 3 to 4 years old while bias theory posits that processing factors are responsible for errors among younger children. The results from three experiments showed that children who failed a test of false belief took as long to respond as those who passed, and both groups of children (...)
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  9.  16
    Children's Understanding That Utterances Emanate From Minds: Using Speaker Belief to Aid Interpretation.Peter Mitchell, Elizabeth J. Robinson & Doreen E. Thompson - 1999 - Cognition 72 (1):45-66.
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  10. Belief as Construction: Inference and Processing Bias.Peter Mitchell & Haruo Kikuno - 2000 - In P. Mitchell & Kevin J. Riggs (eds.), Children's Reasoning and the Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
     
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  11.  13
    The Double Empathy Problem, Camouflage, and the Value of Expertise From Experience.Peter Mitchell, Sarah Cassidy & Elizabeth Sheppard - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    To understand why autistic people are misperceived in the way Jaswal & Akhtar suggest, we should embrace concepts like the “double empathy problem” and camouflaging and recognize the negative consequences these have for mental health in autism. Moreover, we need to value expertise from experience so that autistic people have a voice and indeed a stake in research into autism.
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  12.  20
    The Colour Cognition of Children.Jules Davidoff & Peter Mitchell - 1993 - Cognition 48 (2):121-137.
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  13. Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz - 2003 - Cognition 87:237-239.
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  14.  18
    Responding in the Presence of Free Food: Differential Exposure to the Reinforcement Source.Peter Mitchell & K. Geoffrey White - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (2):121-124.
  15.  49
    Do Children Start Out Thinking They Don't Know Their Own Minds?Peter Mitchell, Ulrich Teucher, Mark Bennett, Fenja Ziegler & Rebecca Wyton - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (3):328-346.
    Various researchers have suggested that below 7 years of age children do not recognize that they are the authority on knowledge about themselves, a suggestion that seems counter-intuitive because it raises the possibility that children do not appreciate their privileged first-person access to their own minds. Unlike previous research, children in the current investigation quantified knowledge and even 5-year-olds tended to assign relatively more to themselves than to an adult (Studies 1 and 2). Indeed, children's estimations were different from ratings (...)
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  16.  18
    Preference for Response-Contingent Vs. Free Reinforcement.K. Geoffrey White & Peter Mitchell - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (2):125-127.
  17.  9
    Seeing the World Through Others’ Minds: Inferring Social Context From Behaviour.Yvonne Teoh, Emma Wallis, Ian D. Stephen & Peter Mitchell - 2017 - Cognition 159:48-60.
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  18.  5
    Being Able to Understand Minds Does Not Result From a Conceptual Shift.Peter Mitchell - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):117-118.
    If anything, Carpendale & Lewis's (C&L's) target article could have gone even further in challenging the view that a radical conceptual shift equips children with a theory of mind. Also, the authors should have elaborated on why their social constructivist account is more plausible than nativism. Their argument against simulation theory is perhaps the least-developed part of their thesis, and does little service to their cause.
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  19. Life and Finite Individuality Two Symposia; 1.Herbert Wildon Carr, J. S. Haldane, D'arcy Wentworth Thompson, Peter Chalmers Mitchell & L. T. Hobhouse - 1918 - Williams.
     
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