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  1. Habermas, Human Agency, and Human Genetic Enhancement: The Grown, the Made, and Responsibility for Actions.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (2):200-210.
    Recent developments in genomic science hold out the tantalizing prospect of soon being able to treat and prevent a wide variety of medical conditions through gene therapy. In time, it may be possible to use similar techniques not simply to combat disease but also to enhance, or improve on, normal human functioning.
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  2. Determining the Common Morality's Norms in the Sixth Edition of Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):584-587.
    Tom Beauchamp and James Childress have always maintained that their four principles approach (otherwise known as principlism) is a globally applicable framework for biomedical ethics. This claim is grounded in their belief that the principles of respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice form part of a 'common morality', or collection of very general norms to which everyone who is committed to morality subscribes. The difficulty, however, has always been how to demonstrate, at least in the absence of a full-blooded (...)
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  3. Habermas, Human Agency, and Human Genetic Enhancement: The Grown, the Made, and Responsibility for Actions.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (2):200-210.
    Recent developments in genomic science hold out the tantalizing prospect of soon being able to treat and prevent a wide variety of medical conditions through gene therapy. In time, it may be possible to use similar techniques not simply to combat disease but also to enhance, or improve on, normal human functioning.
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  4. Capacity and Consent in England and Wales: The Mental Capacity Act Under Scrutiny.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):344-352.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 came into force in England and Wales in 2007. Its primary purpose is to provide “a statutory framework to empower and protect people who may lack capacity to make some decisions for themselves.” Examples of such people are those with dementia, learning disabilities, mental health problems, and so on. The Act also gives those who currently have capacity a legal framework within which they can make arrangements for a time when they may come to lack (...)
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  5.  47
    Reasons, Rationalities, and Procreative Beneficence: Need Häyry Stand Politely By While Savulescu and Herissone-Kelly Disagree?Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):258-267.
    The claim that the answers we give to many of the central questions in genethics will depend crucially upon the particular rationality we adopt in addressing them is central to Matti Häyry’s thorough and admirably fair-minded book, Rationality and the Genetic Challenge. That claim implies, of course, that there exists a plurality of rationalities, or discrete styles of reasoning, that can be deployed when considering concrete moral problems. This, indeed, is Häyry’s position. Although he believes that there are certain features (...)
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  6.  6
    Habermas, Human Agency, and Human Genetic Enhancement: The Grown, the Made, and Responsibility for Actions.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - unknown
    Recent developments in genomic science hold out the tantalizing prospect of soon being able to treat and prevent a wide variety of medical conditions through gene therapy. In time, it may be possible to use similar techniques not simply to combat disease but also to enhance, or improve on, normal human functioning.
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  7.  18
    The Lack of an Obligation to Select the Best Child: Silencing the Principle of Procreative Beneficence.Peter N. Herissone-Kelly - 2017 - In Kristien Hens, Daniela Cutas & Dorothee Horstkötter (eds.), Parental Responsibility in the Context of Neuroscience and Genetics. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. pp. 153-166.
    This chapter aims to show that prospective parents are not bound in their reproductive decision making by a principle of procreative beneficence. That is, they have no obligation to choose the possible child, from a range of possible children they might have, who is likely to lead the best life. I will summarise and clarify the content of previous papers of mine, in which I argue that since the sorts of considerations that underlie the principle of procreative beneficence do not (...)
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