35 found
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  1. The Blind Hens' Challenge: Does It Undermine the View That Only Welfare Matters in Our Dealings with Animals?Peter Sandøe, Paul M. Hocking, Bjorn Förkman, Kirsty Haldane, Helle H. Kristensen & Clare Palmer - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (6):727-742.
    Animal ethicists have recently debated the ethical questions raised by disenhancing animals to improve their welfare. Here, we focus on the particular case of breeding hens for commercial egg-laying systems to become blind, in order to benefit their welfare. Many people find breeding blind hens intuitively repellent, yet ‘welfare-only’ positions appear to be committed to endorsing this possibility if it produces welfare gains. We call this the ‘Blind Hens’ Challenge’. In this paper, we argue that there are both empirical and (...)
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  2.  25
    The Role of Quality Labels in Market-Driven Animal Welfare.Lennart Ravn Heerwagen, Morten Raun Mørkbak, Sigrid Denver, Peter Sandøe & Tove Christensen - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):67-84.
    In policy-making the consumption of specially labelled products, and its role in improving the welfare of livestock, has attracted considerable attention. There is in many countries a diverse market for animal welfare-friendly products which is potentially confusing and may lack transparency. We ask whether special quality labels that involve medium levels of animal welfare, as compared with labels promoting premium levels of animal welfare, have a role to play in promoting improvements in animal welfare. The Danish pork market is our (...)
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  3. Implicit Normativity in Scientific Advice: Values in Nutrition Scientists' Decisions to Give Public Advice.Anna Paldam Folker, Hanne Andersen & Peter Sandøe - 2008 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (2):199-206.
  4.  92
    Food Safety and Ethics: The Interplay Between Science and Values. [REVIEW]Karsten Klint Jensen & Peter Sandøe - 2002 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):245-253.
    The general public in Europe seems tohave lost its confidence in food safety. Theremedy for this, as proposed by the Commissionof the EU, is a scientific rearmament. Thequestion, however, is whether more science willbe able to overturn the public distrust.Present experience seems to suggest thecontrary, because there is widespread distrustin the science-based governmental controlsystems. The answer to this problem is thecreation of an independent scientificFood Authority. However, we argue thatindependent scientific advice alone is unlikelyto re-establish public confidence. It is muchmore (...)
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  5.  31
    Ranking Genetically Modified Plants According to Familiarity.Kathrine Hauge Madsen, Preben Bach Holm, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2002 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):267-278.
    In public debate GMPs are oftenreferred to as being unnatural or a violationof nature. Some people have serious moralconcerns about departures from what is natural.Others are concerned about potential risks tothe environment arising from the combination ofhereditary material moving across naturalboundaries and the limits of scientificforesight of long-term consequences. To addresssome of these concerns we propose that anadditional element in risk assessment based onthe concept of familiarity should beintroduced. The objective is to facilitatetransparency about uncertainties inherent inthe risk assessment of (...)
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  6.  29
    Democracy at its Best? The Consensus Conference in a Cross-National Perspective.Annika Porsborg Nielsen, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):13-35.
    Over recent decades, public participation in technology assessment has spread internationally as an attempt to overcome or prevent societal conflicts over controversial technologies. One outcome of this new surge in public consultation initiatives has been the increased use of participatory consensus conferences in a number of countries. Existing evaluations of consensus conferences tend to focus on the modes of organization, as well as the outcomes, both procedural and substantial, of the conferences they examine. Such evaluations seem to rest on the (...)
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  7.  9
    Communicating Identifiability Risks to Biobank Donors.T. J. Kasperbauer, Mickey Gjerris, Gunhild Waldemar & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (1):123-136.
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  8.  36
    The Factualization of Uncertainty: Risk, Politics, and Genetically Modified Crops – a Case of Rape.Gitte Meyer, Anna Paldam Folker, Rikke Bagger Jørgensen, Martin Krayer von Krauss, Peter Sandøe & Geir Tveit - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):235-242.
    Mandatory risk assessment is intended to reassure concerned citizens and introduce reason into the heated European controversies on genetically modified crops and food. The authors, examining a case of risk assessment of genetically modified oilseed rape, claim that the new European legislation on risk assessment does nothing of the sort and is not likely to present an escape from the international deadlock on the use of genetic modification in agriculture and food production. The new legislation is likely to stimulate the (...)
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  9.  17
    Going Public: Good Scientific Conduct.Gitte Meyer & Peter Sandøe - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):173-197.
    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem underexposed as ethical challenges. Consequently, individual scientists here tend to be left alone with problems and dilemmas, with no guidance for good conduct. Ideas are presented about how to make up for this omission. Using a practical, ethical approach, (...)
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  10.  23
    The Liberating Power of Commercial Marketing.Thomas Boysen Anker, Klemens Kappel & Peter Sandøe - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):519-530.
    The aim of this article is to explore the impact of commercial marketing on personal autonomy. Several philosophers argue that marketing conflicts with ideals of autonomy or, at best, is neutral to these ideals. After qualifying our concept of marketing and introducing the distinctions between (i) divergent and convergent marketing and (ii) being autonomous and acting autonomously, we demonstrate the heretofore unnoticed positive impact of marketing on autonomy. Specifically, we argue that (i) convergent marketing has a significant potential to reinforce (...)
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  11.  54
    Taking Ethics Into Account in Farm Animal Breeding: What Can the Breeding Companies Achieve? [REVIEW]I. Anna S. Olsson, Christian Gamborg & Peter Sandøe - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):37-46.
    Animal welfare and the ethical issues it raises have been discussed intensively for a couple of decades. The emphasis has been on the direct effects of housing and husbandry, but more attention is now being given to problems originating in selective breeding. European attempts to adjust animal welfare legislation to deal with these problems have been largely unsuccessful, but the fact that selective breeding can introduce welfare problems continues to place an ethical responsibility on the animal breeding industry. Since breeding (...)
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  12.  44
    QALYs, Age and Fairness.Klemens Kappel & Peter Sandøe - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (4):297–316.
  13.  37
    Who Benefits?— Why Personal Identity Does Not Matter in a Moral Evaluation of Germ‐Line Gene Therapy.Nils Holtug & Peter Sandøe - 1996 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):157-166.
  14.  38
    Health Branding Ethics.Thomas Boysen Anker, Peter Sandøe, Tanja Kamin & Klemens Kappel - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):33-45.
    Commercial food health branding is a challenging branch of marketing because it might, at the same time, promote healthy living and be commercially viable. However, the power to influence individuals’ health behavior and overall health status makes it crucial for marketing professionals to take into account the ethical dimensions of health branding: this article presents a conceptual analysis of potential ethical problems in health branding. The analysis focuses on ethical concerns related to the application of three health brand elements (functional (...)
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  15.  29
    Herbicide Resistant Sugar Beet – What is the Problem?Kathrine Hauge Madsen & Peter Sandøe - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):161-168.
    Risk assessment studies of herbicide resistant sugarbeet have revealed no risks to human health or the environment.Indeed it appears that commercial growth of this crop mightsecure benefits such as decreased pesticide use and increasedbiodiversity. However, widespread resistance to GM crops such asherbicide resistant sugar beet still persists in Europe. It isargued that this is not just because people do not know therelevant facts. Rather it is because popular resistance to GMfood is driven in part by concerns other than the fear (...)
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  16.  17
    Beyond Castration and Culling: Should We Use Non-Surgical, Pharmacological Methods to Control the Sexual Behavior and Reproduction of Animals?Clare Palmer, Hanne Gervi Pedersen & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):197-218.
    This paper explores ethical issues raised by the application of non-surgical, pharmaceutical fertility control to manage reproductive behaviors in domesticated and wild animal species. We focus on methods that interfere with the effects of GnRH, making animals infertile and significantly suppressing sexual behavior in both sexes. The paper is anchored by considering ethical issues raised by four diverse cases: the use of pharmaceutical fertility control in male slaughter pigs, domesticated stallions and mares, male companion dogs and female white-tailed deer. Ethical (...)
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  17.  16
    Encouraging Self-Reflection by Veterinary Clinicians: Ethics on the Clinic Floor.Sandra A. Corr, Clare Palmer & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):55-57.
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  18.  16
    ‘We Have to Go Where the Money Is’—Dilemmas in the Role of Nutrition Scientists: An Interview Study. [REVIEW]Anna Paldam Folker, Lotte Holm & Peter Sandøe - 2009 - Minerva 47 (2):217-236.
    In Western societies scientists are increasingly expected to seek media exposure and cooperate with industry. Little attention has been given to the way such expectations affect the role of scientific experts in society. To investigate scientists’ own perspectives on these issues eight exploratory, in-depth interviews were conducted in Denmark with reputable nutrition scientists. Additionally, eight interviews were held with ‘key informants’ from the field of nutrition policy. It was found that nutrition scientists experience two dilemmas: first, between their aspiration to (...)
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  19.  12
    Leaping “Out of the Doubt”—Nutrition Advice: Values at Stake in Communicating Scientific Uncertainty to the Public.Anna Paldam Folker & Peter Sandøe - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (2):176-191.
    This article deals with scientific advice to the public where the relevant science is subject to public attention and uncertainty of knowledge. It focuses on a tension in the management and presentation of scientific uncertainty between the uncertain nature of science and the expectation that scientific advisers will provide clear public guidance. In the first part of the paper the tension is illustrated by the presentation of results from a recent interview study with nutrition scientists in Denmark. According to the (...)
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  20.  21
    Animal Welfare Impact Assessments: A Good Way of Giving the Affected Animals a Voice When Trying to Tackle Wild Animal Controversies?Peter Sandøe & Christian Gamborg - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (4):571-578.
    Control of wild animals may give rise to controversy, as is seen in the case of badger control to manage TB in cattle in the UK. However, it is striking that concerns about the potential suffering of the affected animals themselves are often given little attention or completely ignored in policies aimed at dealing with wild animals. McCulloch and Reiss argue that this could be remedied by means of a “mandatory application of formal and systematic Animal Welfare Impact Assessment ”. (...)
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  21.  27
    Secondary Qualities - Subjective and Intrinsic.Peter Sandøe - 1988 - Theoria 54 (3):200-219.
  22.  2
    Involving the Public—Participatory Methods and Democratic Ideals.Annika Porsborg Nielsen, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):191-201.
    Participatory methods aim to address controversy over new technologies through public consultation. This paper first describes the emergence of participatory methods within the framework of technology assessment, then provides an overview of the landscape of participatory arrangements; and, finally, discusses participatory methods in relation to different democratic ideals. The article challenges the widespread assumption that participatory methods can function as normatively neutral tools, which can readily be employed in various social and political settings. Through a case study of consensus conferences (...)
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  23.  28
    Secondary Qualities - Subjective and Intrinsic.Peter Sandøe - 1988 - Theoria 54 (3):200-219.
  24.  5
    Biotechnology and the Animal Issue.Anna S. Olsson & Peter Sandøe - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):39-49.
    Both scientists and representatives of industry claim that important advantages can be secured through advances in biotechnology. However, the European public views new developments with caution, in particular when the applications concern animals and food. These differences in attitude cannot be explained merely in terms of differences in knowledge but also seem to be the upshot of contrasting values. One way to understand moral opinions and values is to view them against the background of so-called ethical theories. In this paper (...)
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  25.  21
    Saving the Young Before the Old - a Reply to John Harris.Klemens Kappel & Peter Sandøe - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (1):84–92.
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  26.  5
    “I Didn’T Have Anything to Decide, I Wanted to Help My Kids”—An Interview-Based Study of Consent Procedures for Sampling Human Biological Material for Genetic Research in Rural Pakistan.Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):113-127.
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  27.  25
    Multiple Aspects of Unnaturalness: Are Cisgenic Crops Perceived as Being More Natural and More Acceptable Than Transgenic Crops? [REVIEW]Henrik Mielby, Peter Sandøe & Jesper Lassen - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):471-480.
    In Europe the use of genetically modified (GM) crops in food production has so far failed to gain wide public approval. Ordinary people are concerned about issues not covered by the existing regulation, including usefulness and unnaturalness. In response, particularly to worries about unnaturalness, biotechnologists have suggested that inserted genes should derive only from the plant itself, or from close relatives. This paper examines public perceptions of these so-called ‘cisgenic crops’ and asks whether the public shares the idea that they (...)
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  28.  24
    Amoralism-on the Limits of Moral Thinking.Peter Sandøe - 1989 - Theoria 55 (3):191-204.
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  29.  23
    Douglas Seanor & N. Fotion (Eds.): Hare and Critics.Peter Sandøe - 1989 - Theoria 55 (3):211-224.
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  30.  14
    Is It Acceptable to Use Animals to Model Obese Humans?: A Critical Discussion of Two Arguments Against the Use of Animals in Obesity Research.Thomas Lund, Thorkild Sørensen, I. Anna Olsson, Axel Hansen & Peter Sandøe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):320-324.
    Animal use in medical research is widely accepted on the basis that it may help to save human lives and improve their quality of life. Recently, however, objections have been made specifically to the use of animals in scientific investigation of human obesity. This paper discusses two arguments for the view that this form of animal use, unlike some other forms of animal-based medical research, cannot be defended. The first argument leans heavily on the notion that people themselves are responsible (...)
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  31.  6
    Food Safety is Political.Peter Sandøe - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):341-343.
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  32.  11
    The Social Dimension of Pluralism: Democratic Procedures and Substantial Constraints.Karsten Klint Jensen, Christian Gamborg & Peter Sandøe - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):313 - 327.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 313-327, October 2011.
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  33. The Perceptual Paradigm of Moral Epistemologi.Peter Sandøe - 1992 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 27:45-71.
     
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  34. Ønske-opfyldelse og moralsk værdi. Recension av Dan Egonsson: Interests, Utilitarianism and Moral Standing. [REVIEW]Peter Sandøe - 1991 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 3.
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  35. Review of Douglas Seanor & N. Fotion : Hare and Critics, Essays on Moral Thinking. [REVIEW]Peter Sandøe - 1989 - Theoria 55 (3):211.
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