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  1.  36
    Still Impossible After All These Years: Reply to Caplan.Peter J. Boettke & Peter T. Leeson - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):155-170.
    Abstract Socialism is strictly ?impossible.? Its impracticability is not, as Bryan Caplan has suggested, a ?quantitative? matter, nor does he show that real?world socialism's incentive problems outweighed its informational ones. Caplan's criticism of Ludwig von Mises's critique of the ?possibility? of socialism fails to appreciate what he meant by ?socialism? and misunderstands Mises's argument about economic calculation. History, too, suggests that socialism's informational deficiency was the most significant problem facing those who tried to implement socialism.
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  2.  77
    Poking Hobbes in the Eye a Plea for Mechanism in Anarchist History.Peter T. Leeson - 2012 - Common Knowledge 18 (3):541-546.
    James C. Scott’s The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia argues that the Zomia people of Southeast Asia consciously chose to live without government and that their choice was sensible. Yet basic economic reasoning, reflected in Hobbes’s classic account of anarchy and the state’s emergence, suggests that life without government would be far worse than life with government, leading people to universally choose the latter. To reconcile Scott’s account of the Zomia peoples’ choice with (...)
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    Socialism: Still Impossible After All These Years.Peter J. Boettke & Peter T. Leeson - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):155-170.
    Socialism is strictly “impossible.” Its impracticability is not, as Bryan Caplan has suggested, a “quantitative” matter, nor does he show that real‐world socialism's incentive problems outweighed its informational ones. Caplan's criticism of Ludwig von Mises's critique of the “possibility” of socialism fails to appreciate what he meant by “socialism” and misunderstands Mises's argument about economic calculation. History, too, suggests that socialism's informational deficiency was the most significant problem facing those who tried to implement socialism.
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    The Many Faces of the Market.Peter T. Leeson, Christopher J. Coyne & Peter J. Boettke - 2004 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 14 (2).
    While markets are all around us, not all markets are the same. Markets come in a variety of colors based on the legality of activities in the specific market. As such, there is no market economy per se, but instead various shades of markets. The different shades of markets that are evidenced in practice directly depend on the institutional environment that makes certain activities legal or illegal. Shifts in the institutional environment are a result of entrepreneurial activity over the rules (...)
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