Results for 'Phenomenology and music'

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  1. Husserlian Phenomenology in a New Key Intersubjectivity, Ethos, the Societal Sphere, Human Encounter, Pathos.Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning & World Congress of Phenomenology - 1991
  2. Phenomenology of Life and the Human Creative Condition.Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning & World Congress of Phenomenology - 1998
     
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  3.  33
    Rethinking the Body and Space in Alfred Schutz’s Phenomenology of Music.Rhonda Claire Siu - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (4):533-546.
    What is initially striking about Alfred Schutz’s phenomenological account of the musical experience, which encompasses both the performance and reception of music, is his apparent dismissal of the corporeal and spatial aspects of that experience. The paper argues that this is largely a product of his wider understanding of temporality wherein the mind and time are privileged over the body and space, respectively. While acknowledging that Schutz’s explicit or stated view is that the body and space are relatively insignificant (...)
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  4.  66
    The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music.Bruce Ellis Benson - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music (...)
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  5.  69
    Music, Phenomenology, Time Consciousness: Meditations After Husserl.David Clarke - 2011 - In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-28.
    David Clarke examines the complex relationship between phenomenological and semiological understandings of music and consciousness through the window of time. He also explores the polar tension between Husserl's phenomenology and Derrida's critique of it, considering what the experience of music might have to offer in response to the crucial question of what is most primordial or essential to consciousness: the unceasing, differential movement of meaning, or some pure flow of subjectivity that underpins all our experience.
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  6. What Do We Hear When We Hear Music?: A Radical Phenomenology of Music.Ruud Welten - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:269-286.
    In this contribution I want to sketch a phenomenology of music, expounding and expanding the philosophy of Michel Henry. In the work of Henry, several approaches to a phenomenology of music are made. The central question of the contribution is: “What do we hear when we hear music?” It is argued that there is an unbridgeable divide between the intentional sphere of the world and its sounds and what in Henry’s philosophy is understood as Life. (...)
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  7.  56
    The Music of Consciousness: Can Musical Form Harmonize Phenomenology and the Brain?Dan Lloyd - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):324-331.
    Context: Neurophenomenology lies at a rich intersection of neuroscience and lived human experience, as described by phenomenology. As a new discipline, it is open to many new questions, methods, and proposals. Problem: The best available scientific ontology for neurophenomenology is based in dynamical systems. However, dynamical systems afford myriad strategies for organizing and representing neurodynamics, just as phenomenology presents an array of aspects of experience to be captured. Here, the focus is on the pervasive experience of subjective time. (...)
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  8.  28
    Phenomenology and the 'Hard Problem' of Consciousness and Music.Eugene Montague - 2011 - In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 29--46.
  9.  14
    Toward a Phenomenology of Music: A Musician's Composition Journal.F. Joseph Smith - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review.
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  10.  7
    Music, Phenomenology, Time.David Clarke - 2011 - In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 1.
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  11.  7
    Phenomenology, Structuralism, and Philosophy of Music: A Qualified Platonist Approach.Christopher Norris - 2007 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (2):128-147.
  12. Towards a Phenomenology of Time-Consciousness in Music.M. Chatterjee - 1971 - Diogenes 19 (74):49-56.
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  13.  76
    The Experiencing of Musical Sound: Prelude to the Phenomenology of Music.F. Joseph Smith - 1981 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):224-224.
  14.  2
    Listening to the Music of Reason: Nicolas Bourbaki and the Phenomenology of the Mathematical Experience.Till Düppe - 2015 - PhaenEx 10:38.
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  15.  14
    Nursing and Music: Considerations of Nightingale’s Environmental Philosophy and Phenomenology.Jon Parr Vijinski, Sandra P. Hirst & Suzanne Goopy - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (4):e12223.
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  16.  47
    Review: The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music[REVIEW]A. Gritten - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):197-199.
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  17.  45
    Phenomenology of Film Music.Jean G. Harrell - 1980 - Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (1):23-34.
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  18. The Phenomenology of the Experience of Listening to Music with Understanding.Luminiţa Pogăceanu - 2010 - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 9:323-328.
     
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  19.  23
    U.S. Phenomenology of Music: A Critical Survey. [REVIEW]Roberto Miraglia - 1998 - Axiomathes 9 (1-2):235-251.
  20.  3
    Music As Heard: A Study in Applied Phenomenology[REVIEW]V. A. Howard - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):103-104.
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  21.  1
    The Phenomenology of Music: A Vital Source of Tagore's Creativity.Sitansu Ray - 2002 - In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), The Visible and the Invisible in the Interplay Between Philosophy, Literature, and Reality. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 311--318.
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  22. Music Theory and Phenomenology of Musical Performance. A Case Study: Five Notes in Joel-Francois Durand's Un Feu Distinct.Münir Beken - 2008 - Analecta Husserliana 96:305-310.
     
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  23. The Phenomenology of Music and the Thomistic Aesthetic.Alfred Pike - 1965 - The Thomist 29 (3):281.
     
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  24.  27
    Everyday Music Listening: Absorption, Dissociation and Trancing.Ruth Herbert - 2011 - Ashgate Pub. Co..
    Music and listening, music and consciousness -- Conceptualizing consciousness -- The phenomenology of everyday music listening experiences -- Absorption, dissociation and trancing -- Musical and non-musical trancing in daily life -- Imaginative involvement -- Musical and non-musical trancing : similarities and differences -- Experiencing life and art : ethological and evolutionary perspectives on -- Transformations of consciousness -- Everyday music listening experiences reframed.
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  25.  13
    Musical Phenomenology: Artistic Traditions and Everyday Experience.Małgorzata A. Szyszkowska - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):141-155.
    The work begins by asking the questions of how contemporary phenomenology is concerned with music, and how phenomenological descriptions of music and musical experiences are helpful in grasping the concreteness of these experiences. I then proceed with minor findings from phenomenological authorities, who seem to somehow need music to explain their phenomenology. From Maurice Merleau-Ponty to Jean-Luc Nancy and back to Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, there are musical findings to be asserted. I propose to (...)
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  26. Music as Atmosphere. Lines of Becoming in Congregational Worship.Friedlind Riedel - 2015 - Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 6:80-111.
    In this paper I offer critical attention to the notion of atmosphere in relation to music. By exploring the concept through the case study of the Closed Brethren worship services, I argue that atmosphere may provide analytical tools to explore the ineffable in ecclesial practices. Music, just as atmosphere, commonly occupies a realm of ineffability and undermines notions such as inside and outside, subject and object. For this reason I present music as a means of knowing the (...)
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  27. “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2009 - Expositions 3:57-71.
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out (...)
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  28.  37
    A Musical Exploration of Consciousness: Book Review of Clarke & Clarke Music and Consciousness. Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-955379-2.Simon Høffding - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):877-882.
  29. Galileo and the 'Invention' of Opera, a Study in the Phenomenology of Consciousness.Fred Kersten - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (1):87-94.
     
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  30.  98
    Nothngness and Science.Michael Christian Cifone - 2014 - Cosmos and History 10 (1):251-275.
    We characterize science in terms of nihilism: the nihilism of science is something faced not in what science i mplies, but as the very essence of science as such. The nihilism of science is the birth of the truth of Nietzsche's announcement "God is dead" from within science as it must now face its repressed subjective core. But in truth, as the Psychoanalytic tradition has determined, it is subjectivity itself that is a bottomless searching-the subject is itself born from nothing. (...)
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  31.  63
    Notes for a Phenomenology of Musical Performance.Arnold Berleant - 1999 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 7 (2):73-79.
    In recognizing the wide range of sensuous perception and at the same time the originary capacity of aesthetic experience, Mikel Dufrenne has shown us the rich capabilities of phenomenology. It is in that spirit that this essay explores musical performance. Music is a multiple art. Its many traditions, forms, genres, and styles, its large variety of instruments and sounds, and its diverse uses and occasions make it difficult to speak of music as a single art form. There (...)
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  32.  3
    “Harmony and Dissonance”: The Musical Perspective on Posthumanity.Anna Bugajska - 2019 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 3 (3):14-28.
    This paper explores the role of music as a communicative tool between the human and the posthuman. It utilizes the theories of embodiment and performativity of Karen Barad and Deniz Peters, as well as the perspectives of Continental Realism and contemporary phenomenology. The examples are drawn from a range of pieces of speculative fiction: dystopia, biopunk and science-fiction. It is shown that the authors bring to attention the enharmonic quality of the relationship between the ALife and its creators (...)
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  33.  2
    «Mutua Sintonia», Intersoggettività E «Vivido Presente». La Filosofia Della Musica di Alfred Schütz.Antonio Di Chiro - 2019 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 75 (2):1343-1380.
    This essay analyzes the reflection of Alfred Schütz on music. The first part will focus on the analysis of those that for Schütz are the constitutive elements of the phenomenology of music. The second part will focus on the idea of music as a social interaction and relationship of mutual harmony. The aim of the work is to demonstrate that Schütz’s reflection on music does not constitute an isolated element within his thought process, but rather (...)
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  34. Musical Scaffolding and the Pleasure of Sad Music: Comment on “An Integrative Review of the Enjoyment of Sadness Associated with Music".Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Physics of Life Reviews.
    Why is listening to sad music pleasurable? Eerola et al. convincingly argue that we should adopt an integrative framework — encompassing biological, psycho-social, and cultural levels of explanation — to answer this question. I agree. The authors have done a great service in providing the outline of such an integrative account. But in their otherwise rich discussion of the psycho-social level of engagements with sad music, they say little about the phenomenology of such experiences — including features (...)
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  35. Philosophical Perspectives on Music.Wayne D. Bowman - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Designed to introduce music students and musicians to the vitality of music philosophical discourse, Philosophical Perspectives on Music explores diverse accounts of the nature and value of music. It offers an accessible, even-handed consideration of philosophical orientations without advocating any single one, demonstrating that there are a number of ways in which music may reasonably be understood. This unique approach examines the strengths and advantages of each perspective as well as its inevitable shortcomings. From the (...)
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  36.  50
    Music-Specific Emotion: An Elusive Quarry.Jerrold Levinson - 2016 - Estetika 53 (2):115-131.
    Expressive music, almost everyone agrees, evokes an emotional response of some kind in receptive listeners, at least some of the time, in at least some conditions of listening. But is such an emotional response distinctive of or unique to the music that evokes it? In other words, is there such a thing as music-specific emotion? This essay is devoted to an exploration of that question and others related to it. In the main part of the essay a (...)
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  37. The Phenomenology of Prayer.Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.) - 2005 - Fordham University Press.
    This collection of ground-breaking essays considers the many dimensions of prayer: how prayer relates us to the divine; prayer's ability to reveal what is essential about our humanity; the power of prayer to transform human desire and action; and the relation of prayer to cognition. It takes up the meaning of prayer from within a uniquely phenomenological point of view, demonstrating that the phenomenology of prayer is as much about the character and boundaries of phenomenological analysis as it is (...)
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  38. Phenomenology and Social Reality.Alfred Schutz & Maurice Alexander Natanson (eds.) - 1970 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff.
    Values and the scope of scientific inquiry, by M. Farber.--The phenomenology of epistemic claims: and its bearing on the essence of philosophy, by R. M. Zaner.--Problems of the Life-World, by A. Gurwitsch.--The Life-World and the particular sub-worlds, by W. Marx.--On the boundaries of the social world, by T. Luckmann.--Alfred Schutz on social reality and social science, by M. Natanson.--Homo oeconomicus and his class mates, by F. Machlup.--Toward a science of political economics, by A. Lowe.--Some notes on reality-orientation in contemporary (...)
     
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  39.  12
    “There is No Such Thing as an Interdisciplinary Relationship”: A Žižekian Critique of Postmodern Music Analysis.Rebecca Day - 2017 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 11 (3).
    The postmodern criticism of music analysis remains unwittingly preoccupied with a false image of ‘the Whole’, or with the construction of unity precisely through privileging its opposite. At the centre of this discourse there often emerges a split between two things—analysis/aesthetics, part/whole, subject/object—where the question then becomes one of reconciliation: how can the analytical methods be subsumed into aesthetic discussions of subjectivity to better represent the ‘thing itself’? This problem is now a cross-disciplinary one, with criticism favouring the application (...)
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  40.  3
    A frame of analysis for collective free improvisation on the bridge between Husserl’s phenomenology of time and some recent readings of the predictive coding model.Lucia Angelino - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):349-369.
    The kind of collective improvisation attained by the “free jazz” at the beginning of the sixties sets a challenge to analytic theories of collective intentionality, that emphasize the role played by future-directed plans in the interlocking and interdependent intentions of the individual participants, because in the free jazz case the performers’ interdependence or [interplay] stems from an intuitive understanding between musicians. Otherwise said: what happens musically is not planned in advance, but arises from spontaneous interactions in the group. By looking (...)
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  41.  5
    A frame of analysis for collective free improvisation on the bridge between Husserl’s phenomenology of time and some recent readings of the predictive coding model.Lucia Angelino - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):349-369.
    The kind of collective improvisation attained by the “free jazz” at the beginning of the sixties sets a challenge to analytic theories of collective intentionality, that emphasize the role played by future-directed plans in the interlocking and interdependent intentions of the individual participants, because in the free jazz case the performers’ interdependence or [interplay] stems from an intuitive understanding between musicians. Otherwise said: what happens musically is not planned in advance, but arises from spontaneous interactions in the group. By looking (...)
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  42.  16
    Intangible Matters.Günter Figal - 2018 - Research in Phenomenology 48 (3):307-317.
    This paper is on matter and on art. Based on the assumption that the everyday attitude toward the world is a kind of materialistic realism and that philosophers, from the beginning of philosophy on, have objected to the plausibility of epistemological reliance on matter, I make attempts to investigate what matter is. I suggest doing this in reference to art. In particular I discuss works of art representing kinds of matter so extraordinary that their material character even could be doubted: (...)
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  43.  2
    A frame of analysis for collective free improvisation on the bridge between Husserl’s phenomenology of time and some recent readings of the predictive coding model.Lucia Angelino - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):349-369.
    The kind of collective improvisation attained by the “free jazz” at the beginning of the sixties sets a challenge to analytic theories of collective intentionality, that emphasize the role played by future-directed plans in the interlocking and interdependent intentions of the individual participants, because in the free jazz case the performers’ interdependence or [interplay] stems from an intuitive understanding between musicians. Otherwise said: what happens musically is not planned in advance, but arises from spontaneous interactions in the group. By looking (...)
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  44.  61
    Expression in Music.Derek Matravers - 2007 - In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    This is a critical review of the current state of the debate in the philosophy of music, and defends the author's view as the phenomenology of the experience.
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  45. Affordances and the Musically Extended Mind.Joel Krueger - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4:1-12.
    I defend a model of the musically extended mind. I consider how acts of “musicking” grant access to novel emotional experiences otherwise inaccessible. First, I discuss the idea of “musical affordances” and specify both what musical affordances are and how they invite different forms of entrainment. Next, I argue that musical affordances – via soliciting different forms of entrainment – enhance the functionality of various endogenous, emotiongranting regulative processes, drawing novel experiences out of us with an expanded complexity and phenomenal (...)
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  46. Doing Things with Music.Joel W. Krueger - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords (...)
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  47.  25
    A Philosophical Defense of the Idea That We Can Hold Each Other in Personhood: Intercorporeal Personhood in Dementia Care. [REVIEW]Kristin Zeiler - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):131-141.
    Since John Locke, regnant conceptions of personhood in Western philosophy have focused on individual capabilities for complex forms of consciousness that involve cognition such as the capability to remember past events and one’s own past actions, to think about and identify oneself as oneself, and/or to reason. Conceptions of personhood such as Locke's qualify as cognition-oriented, and they often fail to acknowledge the role of embodiment for personhood. This article offers an alternative conception of personhood from within the tradition of (...)
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  48.  58
    Music to the Inner Ears: Exploring Individual Differences in Musical Imagery.Roger E. Beaty, Chris J. Burgin, Emily C. Nusbaum, Thomas R. Kwapil, Donald A. Hodges & Paul J. Silvia - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1163-1173.
    In two studies, we explored the frequency and phenomenology of musical imagery. Study 1 used retrospective reports of musical imagery to assess the contribution of individual differences to imagery characteristics. Study 2 used an experience sampling design to assess the phenomenology of musical imagery over the course of one week in a sample of musicians and non-musicians. Both studies found episodes of musical imagery to be common and positive: people rarely wanted such experiences to end and often heard (...)
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  49.  8
    Adorno’s Radio Phenomenology.B. Babich - 2014 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (10):957-996.
    Adorno’s phenomenological study of radio offers a sociology of music in a political and cultural context. Situating that phenomenology in the context of Adorno’s philosophical background and the world political circumstances of Adorno’s collaboration with Paul Lazarsfeld on the Princeton Radio Project, illuminates both Adorno’s Current of Music and the Dialectic of Enlightenment with Max Horkheimer and the ‘Culture Industry’. Together with an analysis of popular music in social practice/culture, this article also explores Adorno’s spatial reflections (...)
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  50. Bodily Expression in Electronic Music: Perspectives on Reclaiming Performativity.Andreas Dorschel, Deniz Peters & Gerhard Eckel (eds.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    In this book, scholars and artists explore the relation between electronic music and bodily expression from perspectives including aesthetics, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, dance and interactive performance arts, sociology, computer music and sonic arts, and music theory, transgressing disciplinary boundaries and established beliefs. The historic decoupling of action and sound generation might be seen to have distorted or even effaced the expressive body, with the retention of performance qualities via recoupling not equally retaining bodily expressivity. When, (...)
     
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