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Phil Hutchinson [37]Phil Zielinska Hutchinson [1]
  1.  17
    Where the ethical action is.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):45–48.
    It is common to think of medical and ethical modes of thought as different in kind. In such terms, some clinical situations are made more complicated by an additional ethical component. Against this picture, we propose that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind, but merely different aspects of what it means to be human. We further propose that clinicians are uniquely positioned to synthesise these two aspects without prior knowledge of philosophical ethics.
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  2.  30
    Shame and philosophy: an investigation in the philosophy of emotions and ethics.Phil Hutchinson - 2008 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Experimental methods and conceptual confusion : philosophy, science, and what emotions really are -- To 'make our voices resonate' or 'to be silent'? : shame as fundamental ontology -- Emotion, cognition, and world -- Shame and world.
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  3.  50
    Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Philosophical Investigations 45 (4):453-470.
    In this paper, we explicate the method of Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy (IOLP). The term was coined by John Cook to describe the unique philosophical approach of Frank Ebersole. We argue that (i) IOLP is an overlooked yet valuable philosophical method grounded in our everyday experiences and concerns; and (ii) as such, Frank Ebersole is an important but neglected figure in the history of ordinary language philosophy.
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  4. Editorial Introduction: Praxeological Gestalts – Philosophy, Cognitive Science and Sociology Meet Gestalt Psychology.Phil Hutchinson, Anna C. Zielinska & Doug Hardman - 2022 - Philosophia Scientiae 26 (3):5-19.
    1 Context The idea for the current issue of _Philosophia Scientiæ_ emerged from discussions which took place in the Manchester Ethnomethodology Reading Group. This reading group has its origins in Wes Sharrock’s weekly discussion groups, which have taken place in Manchester (UK) since the early 1970s. As the global Covid-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, the reading group moved online, facilitated by Phil Hutchinson and Alex Holder. Being an online reading group opened up participation to people beyond Northwest UK and (...)
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  5. Toward a perspicuous presentation of "perspicuous presentation".Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
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  6.  66
    What's the Point of Elucidation?Phil Hutchinson - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (5):691-713.
    In this article I examine three ways in which one might interpret Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations (PI). In a partial response to Hans‐Johann Glock's article in this journal, I suggest that since publication PI has, broadly speaking, been interpreted in three ways: doctrinal; elucidatory; or therapeutic. The doctrinal interpretation is shown to be, at best, difficult to sustain textually. The elucidatory (standard) interpretation, though seemingly closer to the text, is shown both to implicate Wittgenstein in some unfortunate philosophical commitments and to (...)
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  7.  24
    The Meaning Response, "Placebo," and Methods.Phil Hutchinson & Daniel E. Moerman - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):361-378.
    Is there a response, which is not accounted for by regression to the mean, natural history, the Hawthorne effect?The term placebo comes to us from the Latin for "I shall please," indicating that the phenomenon known as the "placebo effect" or "placebo response" has been familiar to medical practitioners for a number of centuries, at least. As we reached the mid-20th century and randomized controlled trials became a central feature of medical research, the use of controls and blinding in those (...)
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  8.  43
    Shame and HIV: Strategies for addressing the negative impact shame has on public health and diagnosis and treatment of HIV.Phil Hutchinson & Rageshri Dhairyawan - 2017 - Bioethics 32 (1):68-76.
    There are five ways in which shame might negatively impact upon our attempts to combat and treat HIV. Shame can prevent an individual from disclosing all the relevant facts about their sexual history to the clinician. Shame can be a motivational factor in people living with HIV not engaging with or being retained in care. Shame can prevent individuals from presenting at clinics for STI and HIV testing. Shame can prevent an individual from disclosing their HIV status to new sexual (...)
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  9.  9
    Bioethics to the rescue! A response to Emmerich.Douglas Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (11):887-887.
    In our article,Where the ethical action is,we argue that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind but merely different aspects of a clinical situation. In response, Emmerich argues that in so doing, we neglect several important features of healthcare and medical education. Although we applaud the spirit of Emmerich’s response, we argue that his critique is an attempt at a general defence of the value of bioethical expertise in clinical practice, rather than a specific critique of (...)
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  10.  15
    Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of “Perspicuous Presentation” 1.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141-160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected inBaker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on “perspicuous presentations,” we offer new criticisms of ‘elucidatory’ readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the ‘perspicuous presentation’ concept, as an achievement‐term, rather than a kind of ‘objective’ mapping of (...)
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  11. Teaching Philosophy.Gillian Howie, Michael Mcghee, Phil Hutchinson, Michael Loughlin, Richard Shusterman & William Edelglass - 2009 - Continuum.
    In the current academic climate, teaching is often seen as secondary to research. Teaching Philosophy seeks to bring teaching philosophy higher on the academic agenda.An international team of contributors, all of whom share the view that philosophy is a subject that can transform students, offers practical guidance and advice for teachers of philosophy. The book suggests ways in which the teaching of philosophy at undergraduate level might be facilitated. Some of the essays place the emphasis on individual self discovery, others (...)
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  12.  36
    The philosopher's task: value‐based practice and bringing to consciousness underlying philosophical commitments.Phil Hutchinson - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):999-1001.
  13.  10
    The Missing ‘E’: Radical Embodied Cognitive Science, Ecological Psychology and the Place of Ethics in Our Responsiveness to the Lifeworld.Phil Hutchinson - 2019 - In Joel Backström, Hannes Nykänen, Niklas Toivakainen & Thomas Wallgren (eds.), Moral Foundations of Philosophy of Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 103-127.
    Since its origins in the mid-Twentieth Century, Cognitive Science has almost exclusively operated within the philosophical frames provided by Cartesian Representationalism. In recent years, alternative, phenomenological and pragmatist, frames have served as a resource for the emergence of non-representational approaches to mind and cognition. These have been gathered under the label ‘4E cognition’, indicating their Embodied, Extended, Enacted and Embedded nature. This chapter examines one version of 4E cognition, which builds upon Ecological Psychology, and argues that it fails to pass (...)
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  14. An elucidatory interpretation of Wittgenstein's tractatus: A critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's reading of tractatus 6.54.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During this debate, (...)
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  15.  45
    De‐mystifying tacit knowing and clues: a comment on Henry et al.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):944-947.
  16. There is No Such Thing as a Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch.Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2008 - Aldershot, UK & Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    The death of Peter Winch in 1997 sparked a revived interest in his work with this book arguing his work suffered misrepresentation in both recent literature and in contemporary critiques of his writing. Debates in philosophy and sociology about foundational questions of social ontology and methodology often claim to have adequately incorporated and moved beyond Winch's concerns. Re-establishing a Winchian voice, the authors examine how such contentions involve a failure to understand central themes in Winch's writings and that the issues (...)
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  17. Emotion-philosophy-science.Phil Hutchinson - 2009 - In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and understanding: Wittgensteinian perspectives. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  18.  29
    Unsinnig: A reply to Hutto.Phil Hutchinson - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):569 – 577.
  19.  18
    Wittgensteinian Ethnomethodology (1): Gurwitsch, Garfinkel, and Wittgenstein and the Meaning of Praxeological Gestalts.Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Philosophia Scientiae:61-93.
    Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology (EM) at its core involves a praxeological, or interactional, respecification of Gestalt phenomena. In early EM, this is pursued through the development of a category of praxeological Gestalten in which social facts (or social units) are respecified as Gestalt phenomena, where members are the constituents and the social unit is the whole or Gestalt, produced praxeologically by the methodic work of its members. In later work, Garfinkel would praxeologically transpose traditional perceptual Gestalt phenomena, such as music, to explore (...)
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  20.  12
    Editors' Introduction to Special Section on Meaning Response and the Placebo Effect.Charlotte Blease, Marco Annoni & Phil Hutchinson - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):349-352.
    Over 200 years ago, doctors' most effective tools were typically not found in their medical bags. Indeed, most treatments in the history of medicine have, until relatively recently, caused more harm than good. Prior to the biomedical revolution in the late 19th century, doctors' most reliable and effective instruments of healing were their skills of communication with patients and an aptitude for a positive and supportive bedside manner. Bearing out this portrait of medicine, Thomas Jefferson, writing in 1807, noted that (...)
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  21.  10
    Whose models? Which representations? A response to Wagner.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (12):850-851.
    InWhere the Ethical Action Is,we argued that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind but different aspects of a situation. One of the consequences of this argument is that the requirement for or benefits of normative moral theorising in bioethics is undercut. In response, Wagner has argued that normative moral theories should be reconceived as models. Wagner’s argument seems to be that once reconceived as models, the rationale for moral theorising, undercut by our arguments inWhere the (...)
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  22.  12
    Encarando a atrocidade: a vergonha e sua ausência.Phil Hutchinson, Tradução de Willian Martini, Tiago Azambuja & Janyne Sattler - 2016 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 28 (44):689.
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  23.  10
    Introduction éditoriale : Gestalts praxéologiques – Quand la philosophie, les sciences cognitives et la sociologie rencontrent la psychologie de la forme.Phil Zielinska Hutchinson - 2022 - Philosophia Scientiae:5-19.
    1 Context The idea for the current issue of Philosophia Scientiæ emerged from discussions which took place in the Manchester Ethnomethodology Reading Group. This reading group has its origins in Wes Sharrock’s weekly discussion groups, which have taken place in Manchester (UK) since the early 1970s. As the global Covid-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, the reading group moved online, facilitated by Phil Hutchinson and Alex Holder. Being an online reading group opened up participation to people b...
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  24.  13
    Placebo.Phil Hutchinson - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 72:55-56.
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  25.  9
    Steiner’s Possession.Phil Hutchinson - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (3):245-265.
    Since the resurgence of interest in political philosophy in the early 1970s debates about freedom have been central. Throughout this period Hillel Steiner has proposed and defended the pure negative conception of freedom. This work is complemented by Ian Carter’s recent writings on freedom. Carter and Steiner advance a non-normative conception of freedom employing tools from contemporary philosophy of action and language. In this article I seek to offer a deflationary critique of the Carter/Steiner position. My purpose is not to (...)
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  26.  14
    Steiner’s Possession.Phil Hutchinson - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (3):245-265.
    Since the resurgence of interest in political philosophy in the early 1970s debates about freedom have been central. Throughout this period Hillel Steiner has proposed and defended the pure negative conception of freedom. This work is complemented by Ian Carter’s recent writings on freedom. Carter and Steiner advance a non-normative (empirical) conception of freedom employing tools from contemporary philosophy of action and language. In this article I seek to offer a deflationary critique of the Carter/Steiner position. My purpose is not (...)
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  27.  9
    The Five Parameters.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 72:10-16.
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  28.  10
    The Five Parameters.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2015 - The Philosophers' Magazine 69:23-29.
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  29.  14
    The Five Parameters.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2015 - The Philosophers' Magazine 68:19-26.
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  30.  11
    The Five Parameters.Phil Hutchinson - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 75:20-25.
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  31.  14
    The Five Parameters.Phil Hutchinson - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 74:13-18.
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  32.  33
    Two worlds of action: social science, social theory and systems of sociological refraction.Phil Hutchinson, Andrei Korbut & Ekaterina Pavlenko - 2012 - Russian Sociological Review 11 (2):75-99.
    Despite many points of divergence, social scientists and social theorists seem united by one primary concern: to identify what it is people are doing. The thought that this might count as not only a viable but centrally important concern is grounded in a scepticism about the ability of societies’ ordinary members to reliably correctly identify their own and others’ actions. In this scepticism, such social scientists and social theorists usually situate themselves in opposition to ethnomethodologists and Peter Winch. This scepticism (...)
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  33.  19
    What’s wrong with GM food?Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 65:39-45.
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  34. What’s wrong with GM food?Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 65:39-45.
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  35.  20
    There is No Such Thing as Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch. [REVIEW]Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):795-797.
    This provocative, engaging and important book marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Peter Winch's seminal The Idea of a Social Science. The authors – the first two philosophers, the third a sociologist – have worked together in various permutations before. No-one familiar with their previous publications will be surprised that the dominant voice throughout is Wittgenstein's – that is, Wittgenstein as read ‘resolutely’ by ‘new Wittgensteinians’. They have three principal aims: first, to read Winch's own work in an (...)
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  36.  13
    Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects. [REVIEW]Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (3):432-455.
    Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects By Gordon Baker. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004 pp. 328. £40.00 HB.. Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism By Ilham Dilman. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. pp. 240. £52.50 HB. Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies By P. M. S. Hacker. Oxford: Oxford University Press,. pp. 400. £45.00 HB; £19.99 PB. Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction By David G. Stern. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. pp. 224. £40.00 HB; £10.99 PB.
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  37.  33
    Review: Review Article: Whose Wittgenstein? [REVIEW]Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (313):432 - 455.
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  38.  71
    Wittgenstein's method: Neglected aspects by Gordon Baker. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004 pp. 328. £40.00 HB. (hereafter: BWM). Wittgenstein's copernican revolution: The question of linguistic idealism by Ilham Dilman. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. Pp. 240. £52.50 HB. (hereafter: DWCR) Wittgenstein: Connections and controversies by P. M. S. Hacker. Oxford: Oxford university press, (2001 [pb 2004]). Pp. 400. £45.00 HB; £19.99 PB. (hereafter: HWCC) Wittgenstein's philosophical investigations: An introduction by David G. Stern. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2004. Pp. 224. £40.00 HB; £10.99 PB. (hereafter: SWPI). [REVIEW]Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (3):432-455.