Results for 'Phil�� Swanepoel'

982 found
Order:
  1.  39
    Physical Causation.Phil Dowe - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, published in 2000, is a clear account of causation based firmly in contemporary science. Dowe discusses in a systematic way, a positive account of causation: the conserved quantities account of causal processes which he has been developing over the last ten years. The book describes causal processes and interactions in terms of conserved quantities: a causal process is the worldline of an object which possesses a conserved quantity, and a causal interaction involves the exchange of conserved quantities. Further, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   165 citations  
  2.  3
    The Possibility of Deliberate Norm-Adherence in AI.Danielle Swanepoel - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 23 (2):157-163.
    Moral agency status is often given to those individuals or entities which act intentionally within a society or environment. In the past, moral agency has primarily been focused on human beings and some higher-order animals. However, with the fast-paced advancements made in artificial intelligence, we are now quickly approaching the point where we need to ask an important question: should we grant moral agency status to AI? To answer this question, we need to determine the moral agency status of these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Vagueness, Logic and Use: Four Experimental Studies on Vagueness.Phil Serchuk, Ian Hargreaves & Richard Zach - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (5):540-573.
    Although arguments for and against competing theories of vagueness often appeal to claims about the use of vague predicates by ordinary speakers, such claims are rarely tested. An exception is Bonini et al. (1999), who report empirical results on the use of vague predicates by Italian speakers, and take the results to count in favor of epistemicism. Yet several methodological difficulties mar their experiments; we outline these problems and devise revised experiments that do not show the same results. We then (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  4.  6
    Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics.Phil Hutchinson - 2008 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Experimental methods and conceptual confusion : philosophy, science, and what emotions really are -- To 'make our voices resonate' or 'to be silent'? : shame as fundamental ontology -- Emotion, cognition, and world -- Shame and world.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5. Aristotle on Ontological Dependence.Phil Corkum - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (1):65 - 92.
    Aristotle holds that individual substances are ontologically independent from nonsubstances and universal substances but that non-substances and universal substances are ontologically dependent on substances. There is then an asymmetry between individual substances and other kinds of beings with respect to ontological dependence. Under what could plausibly be called the standard interpretation, the ontological independence ascribed to individual substances and denied of non-substances and universal substances is a capacity for independent existence. There is, however, a tension between this interpretation and the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  6.  22
    Nanotechnology, Governance, and Public Deliberation: What Role for the Social Sciences?Phil Macnaghten, , Matthew B. Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2005 - Science Communication 27 (2):268-291.
    In this article we argue that nanotechnology represents an extraordinary opportunity to build in a robust role for the social sciences in a technology that remains at an early, and hence undetermined, stage of development. We examine policy dynamics in both the United States and United Kingdom aimed at both opening up, and closing down, the role of the social sciences in nanotechnologies. We then set out a prospective agenda for the social sciences and its potential in the future shaping (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  7. Cause and Chance: Causation in an Indeterministic World.Phil Dowe & Paul Noordhof (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    Philosophers have long been fascinated by the connection between cause and effect: are 'causes' things we can experience, or are they concepts provided by our minds? The study of causation goes back to Aristotle, but resurged with David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and is now one of the most important topics in metaphysics. Most of the recent work done in this area has attempted to place causation in a deterministic, scientific, worldview. But what about the unpredictable and chancey world we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  8.  92
    Process Causality and Asymmetry.Phil Dowe - 1992 - Erkenntnis 37 (2):179-196.
    Process theories of causality seek to explicate causality as a property of individual causal processes. This paper examines the capacity of such theories to account for the asymmetry of causation. Three types of theories of asymmetry are discussed; the subjective, the temporal, and the physical, the third of these being the preferred approach. Asymmetric features of the world, namely the entropic and Kaon arrows, are considered as possible sources of causal asymmetry and a physical theory of asymmetry is subsequently developed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  9. Wesley Salmon’s Process Theory of Causality and the Conserved Quantity Theory.Phil Dowe - 1992 - Philosophy of Science 59 (2):195-216.
    This paper examines Wesley Salmon's "process" theory of causality, arguing in particular that there are four areas of inadequacy. These are that the theory is circular, that it is too vague at a crucial point, that statistical forks do not serve their intended purpose, and that Salmon has not adequately demonstrated that the theory avoids Hume's strictures about "hidden powers". A new theory is suggested, based on "conserved quantities", which fulfills Salmon's broad objectives, and which avoids the problems discussed.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   112 citations  
  10.  12
    Physical Causation.Phil Dowe - 2002 - Erkenntnis 56 (2):258-263.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   158 citations  
  11.  66
    Key Thinkers on Space and Place.Phil Hubbard, Rob Kitchin & Gill Valentine (eds.) - 2004 - Sage Publications.
    `It is a safe bet that Key Thinkers will emerge as something of a 'hit' within the undergraduate community and will rise to prominance as a 'must buy' -Environment and Planning `Key Thinkers on Space and Place is an engagingly written, well-researched and very accessible book. It will surely prove an invaluable tool for students, whom I would strongly encourage to purchase this edited collection as one of the best guides to recent geographical thought' -Claudio Minca, University of Newcastle `Key (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  12.  23
    Democracy Without Participation: A New Politics for a Disengaged Era.Phil Parvin - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (1):31-52.
    Changing patterns of political participation observed by political scientists over the past half-century undermine traditional democratic theory and practice. The vast majority of democratic theory, and deliberative democratic theory in particular, either implicitly or explicitly assumes the need for widespread citizen participation. It requires that all citizens possess the opportunity to participate and also that they take up this opportunity. But empirical evidence gathered over the past half-century strongly suggests that many citizens do not have a meaningful opportunity to participate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  46
    What's the Point of Elucidation?Phil Hutchinson - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (5):691-713.
  14.  98
    Ontological Dependence and Grounding in Aristotle.Phil Corkum - 2016 - Oxford Handbooks Online in Philosophy 1.
    The relation of ontological dependence or grounding, expressed by the terminology of separation and priority in substance, plays a central role in Aristotle’s Categories, Metaphysics, De Anima and elsewhere. The article discusses three current interpretations of this terminology. These are drawn along the lines of, respectively, modal-existential ontological dependence, essential ontological dependence, and grounding or metaphysical explanation. I provide an opinionated introduction to the topic, raising the main interpretative questions, laying out a few of the exegetical and philosophical options that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15. Aristotle on Mathematical Truth.Phil Corkum - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1057-1076.
    Both literalism, the view that mathematical objects simply exist in the empirical world, and fictionalism, the view that mathematical objects do not exist but are rather harmless fictions, have been both ascribed to Aristotle. The ascription of literalism to Aristotle, however, commits Aristotle to the unattractive view that mathematics studies but a small fragment of the physical world; and there is evidence that Aristotle would deny the literalist position that mathematical objects are perceivable. The ascription of fictionalism also faces a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  16. A Counterfactual Theory of Prevention and 'Causation' by Omission.Phil Dowe - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):216 – 226.
    There is, no doubt, a temptation to treat preventions, such as ‘the father’s grabbing the child prevented the accident’, and cases of ‘causation’ by omission, such as ‘the father’s inattention was the cause of the child’s accident’, as cases of genuine causation. I think they are not, and in this paper I defend a theory of what they are. More specifically, the counterfactual theory defended here is that a claim about prevention or ‘causation’ by omission should be understood not as (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  17. Aristotle on Predication.Phil Corkum - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):793-813.
    A predicate logic typically has a heterogeneous semantic theory. Subjects and predicates have distinct semantic roles: subjects refer; predicates characterize. A sentence expresses a truth if the object to which the subject refers is correctly characterized by the predicate. Traditional term logic, by contrast, has a homogeneous theory: both subjects and predicates refer; and a sentence is true if the subject and predicate name one and the same thing. In this paper, I will examine evidence for ascribing to Aristotle the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18.  37
    Narratives of Mastery and Resistance: Lay Ethics of Nanotechnology. [REVIEW]Phil Macnaghten - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):141-151.
    This paper contributes towards a lay ethics of nanotechnology through an analysis of talk from focus groups designed to examine how laypeople grapple with the meaning of a technology ‘in-the-making’. We describe the content of lay ethical concerns before suggesting that this content can be understood as being structured by five archetypal narratives which underpin talk. These we term: ‘the rich get richer and the poor get poorer’; ‘kept in the dark’; ‘opening Pandora’s box’; ‘messing with nature’; and ‘be careful (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  19.  28
    Seeing Patterns in Randomness: A Computational Model of Surprise.Phil Maguire, Philippe Moser, Rebecca Maguire & Mark T. Keane - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):103-118.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. The Possibility of Morality.Phil Brown - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (3):627-636.
    Despite much discussion over the existence of moral facts, metaethicists have largely ignored the related question of their possibility. This paper addresses the issue from the moral error theorist’s perspective, and shows how the arguments that error theorists have produced against the existence of moral facts at this world, if sound, also show that moral facts are impossible, at least at worlds non-morally identical to our own and, on some versions of the error theory, at any world. So error theorists’ (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Agential Risks: A Comprehensive Introduction.Phil Torres - 2016 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 26 (2):31-47.
    The greatest existential threats to humanity stem from increasingly powerful advanced technologies. Yet the “risk potential” of such tools can only be realized when coupled with a suitable agent who; through error or terror; could use the tool to bring about an existential catastrophe. While the existential risk literature has provided many accounts of how advanced technologies might be misused and abused to cause unprecedented harm; no scholar has yet explored the other half of the agent-tool coupling; namely the agent. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. Superintelligence and the Future of Governance: On Prioritizing the Control Problem at the End of History.Phil Torres - forthcoming - In Roman Yampolskiy (ed.), Artificial Intelligence Safety and Security. CRC Press.
    This chapter argues that dual-use emerging technologies are distributing unprecedented offensive capabilities to nonstate actors. To counteract this trend, some scholars have proposed that states become a little “less liberal” by implementing large-scale surveillance policies to monitor the actions of citizens. This is problematic, though, because the distribution of offensive capabilities is also undermining states’ capacity to enforce the rule of law. I will suggest that the only plausible escape from this conundrum, at least from our present vantage point, is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23. Substance and Independence in Aristotle.Phil Corkum - 2013 - In B. Schnieder, A. Steinberg & M. Hoeltje (eds.), Varieties of Dependence: Ontological Dependence, Supervenience, and Response-Dependence. Basic Philosophical Concepts Series, Philosophia Verlag. pp. 36-67.
    Individual substances are the ground of Aristotle’s ontology. Taking a liberal approach to existence, Aristotle accepts among existents entities in such categories other than substance as quality, quantity and relation; and, within each category, individuals and universals. As I will argue, individual substances are ontologically independent from all these other entities, while all other entities are ontologically dependent on individual substances. The association of substance with independence has a long history and several contemporary metaphysicians have pursued the connection. In this (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24.  90
    Causality and Conserved Quantities: A Reply to Salmon.Phil Dowe - 1995 - Philosophy of Science 62 (2):321-333.
    In a recent paper (1994) Wesley Salmon has replied to criticisms (e.g., Dowe 1992c, Kitcher 1989) of his (1984) theory of causality, and has offered a revised theory which, he argues, is not open to those criticisms. The key change concerns the characterization of causal processes, where Salmon has traded "the capacity for mark transmission" for "the transmission of an invariant quantity." Salmon argues against the view presented in Dowe (1992c), namely that the concept of "possession of a conserved quantity" (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  25. Aristotle on Nonsubstantial Individuals.Phil Corkum - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):289-310.
    As a first stab, call a property recurrent if it can be possessed by more than one object, and nonrecurrent if it can be possessed by at most one object. The question whether Aristotle holds that there are nonrecurrent properties has spawned a lively and ongoing debate among commentators over the last forty-five years. One source of textual evidence in the Categories, drawn on in this debate, is Aristotle’s claim that certain properties are inseparable from what they are in. Here (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  26.  95
    Causes Are Physically Connected to Their Effects: Why Preventers and Omissions Are Not Causes.Phil Dowe - 2004 - In Christopher Hitchcock (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 189--196.
  27.  17
    Existential Risks: A Philosophical Analysis.Phil Torres - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines and analyzes five definitions of ‘existential risk.’ It tentatively adopts a pluralistic approach according to which the definition that scholars employ should depend up...
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  34
    Democracy, Capital, and the Rise of the New Inequality. [REVIEW]Phil Parvin - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (6):863-876.
  29. Proportionality and Omissions.Phil Dowe - 2010 - Analysis 70 (3):446-451.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  30. Presentism, Truthmakers and Distributional Properties.Phil Corkum - 2014 - Synthese 191 (14):3427-46.
    Presentists face a challenge from truthmaker theory: if you hold both that the only existing objects are presently existing and that truth supervenes on being, then you will be hard pressed to identify some existent on which a given true but traceless claim about the past supervenes. One reconciliation strategy, advocated by Cameron (2011), is to appeal to distributional properties so to serve as presently existing truthmakers for past truths. I argue that a presentist ought to deny that distributional properties (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  77
    Causal Processes.Phil Dowe - 2004 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  32. Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of "Perspicuous Presentation".Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  33.  47
    The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity.Phil Jenkins - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (3):319-321.
  34.  32
    Stout, Rawls, and the Idea of Public Reason.Phil Ryan - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (3):540-562.
    Jeffrey Stout claims that John Rawls's idea of public reason (IPR) has contributed to a Christian backlash against liberalism. This essay argues that those whom Stout calls “antiliberal traditionalists” have misunderstood Rawls in important ways, and goes on to consider Stout's own critiques of the IPR. While Rawls's idea is often interpreted as a blanket prohibition on religious reasoning outside church and home, the essay will show that the very viability of the IPR depends upon a rich culture of deliberation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  17
    Machiavelli and the Global Compass: Ends and Means in Ethics and Leadership. [REVIEW]Phil Harris - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (S1):131 - 138.
    This article discusses the perpetual debate on the Florentine, Niccolo Machiavelli's ethical values and leadership ideas and the consequent creation of the mythical reputation and negative epithet 'Machiavellian'. This article proposes recommendations on how Machiavelli's thought and his study can best be applied to bring genuine clarity and value to organisations in these interesting and turbulent times providing a hopefully viable compass for a changing landscape.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  25
    Idealism, Realism, and Immigration: David Miller’s Strangers in Our Midst.Phil Parvin - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 20 (6):697-706.
  37.  31
    Ethical Exemplification and the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct: An Empirical Investigation of Auditor and Public Perceptions.Phil A. Brown, Morris H. Stocks & W. Mark Wilder - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):39-71.
    This research applies the impression management theory of exemplification in an accounting study by identifying and measuring differences in both auditor and public perceptions of exemplary behaviors. The auditors were divided into two groups, one of which reported self-perceptions (A-S) while the other group reported their perceptions of a typical auditor (A-O). There were two separate public groups, which gave their perceptions of a typical auditor and were divided based on their levels of accounting sophistication. The more sophisticated public group (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. Attention, Perception, and Thought in Aristotle.Phil Corkum - 2010 - Dialogue 49 (2):199-222.
    In the first part of the paper, I’ll rehearse an argument that perceiving that we see and hear isn’t a special case of perception in Aristotle but is rather a necessary condition for any perception whatsoever: the turning of one’s attention to the affection of the sense organs. In the second part of the paper, I’ll consider the thesis that the activity of the active intellect is analogous to perceiving that we see and hear.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  17
    Cultural Appropriation and the Arts.Phil Jenkins - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):244-245.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. The Case for Time Travel.Phil Dowe - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (3):441-451.
    This idea of time travel has long given philosophers difficulties. Most recently, in his paper ‘Troubles with Time Travel’ William Grey presents a number of objections to time travel, some well known in the philosophical literature, others quite novel. In particular Grey's ‘no destinations’ and ‘double occupation’ objections I take to be original, while what I will call the ‘times paradox’ and the ‘possibility restriction argument’ are versions of well known objections. I show how each of these can be answered, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  41.  23
    Unsinnig: A Reply to Hutto.Phil Hutchinson - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):569 – 577.
  42. Backwards Causation and the Direction of Causal Processes.Phil Dowe - 1996 - Mind 105 (418):227-248.
  43. The Future of War: The Ethical Potential of Leaving War to Lethal Autonomous Weapons.Steven Umbrello, Phil Torres & Angelo F. De Bellis - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):273-282.
    Lethal Autonomous Weapons (LAWs) are robotic weapons systems, primarily of value to the military, that could engage in offensive or defensive actions without human intervention. This paper assesses and engages the current arguments for and against the use of LAWs through the lens of achieving more ethical warfare. Specific interest is given particularly to ethical LAWs, which are artificially intelligent weapons systems that make decisions within the bounds of their ethics-based code. To ensure that a wide, but not exhaustive, survey (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  70
    Growing Local Food: Scale and Local Food Systems Governance.Phil Mount - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):107-121.
    “Scaling-up” is the next hurdle facing the local food movement. In order to effect broader systemic impacts, local food systems (LFS) will have to grow, and engage either more or larger consumers and producers. Encouraging the involvement of mid-sized farms looks to be an elegant solution, by broadening the accessibility of local food while providing alternative revenue streams for troubled family farms. Logistical, structural and regulatory barriers to increased scale in LFS are well known. Less is understood about the way (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  45.  74
    Reason and Revelation: Kant and the Problem of Authority. [REVIEW]Phil Enns - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):103 - 114.
    This paper explores the significance of authority for Kant’s understanding of the relationship between reason and revelation. Beginning with the separation of the faculties of Theology and Philosophy in Conflict, it will be shown that Kant sees a clear distinction between the authority of reason and that of revelation. However, when one turns to Religion, it is also clear that Kant sees an important, perhaps necessary, relationship between the two. Drawing on a variety of texts, in particular those concerning the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Absences, Possible Causation, and the Problem of Non-Locality.Phil Dowe - 2009 - The Monist 92 (1):23-40.
    I argue that so-called ‘absence causation’must be treated in terms of counterfactuals about causation such as ‘had a occurred, a would have caused b’. First, I argue that some theories of causation that accept absence causation are unattractive because they undermine the idea of possible causation. And second, I argue that accepting absence causation violates a principle commonly associated with relativity.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47.  24
    Inhabiting Compassion: A Pastoral Theological Paradigm.Phil C. Zylla - 2017 - Hts Theological Studies 73 (4):1-9.
    Inspired by the vision of care in Vincent van Gogh's depiction of the parable of the Good Samaritan, this article offers a paradigm for inhabiting compassion. Compassion is understood in this article as a moral emotion that is also a pathocentric virtue. This definition creates a dynamic view of compassion as a desire to alleviate the suffering of others, the capacity to act on behalf of others and a commitment to sustain engagement with the suffering other. To weave this vision (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Preconscious Processing.Phil Merikle - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
  49.  26
    Moral Bioenhancement and Agential Risks: Good and Bad Outcomes.Phil Torres - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (9):691-696.
    In Unfit for the Future, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu argue that our collective existetial predicment is unprecedentedly dangerous due to climate change and terrorism. Given these global risks to human prosperity and survival, Persson and Savulescu argue that we should explore the radical possibility of moral bioenhancement in addition to cognitive enhancement. In this article, I argue that moral bioenhancements could nontrivially exacerbate the threat posed by certain kinds of malicious agents, while reducing the threat of other kinds. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Drama as Life: The Significance of Goffman's Changing Use of the Theatrical Metaphor.Phil Manning - 1991 - Sociological Theory 9 (1):70-86.
    Goffman makes considerable use of the metaphor of social life as theater. This metaphor has a significant impact on his thought in three areas: 1) it is central to his changing views about cynicism and trust in everyday life; 2) metaphor in general is a method of sociological inquiry; and 3) metaphor suggests a "limit" that his later work attempts to transcend.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 982