Results for 'Philip Beaman'

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  1. Stakes, Scales, and Skepticism.Kathryn Francis, Philip Beaman & Nat Hansen - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:427--487.
    There is conflicting experimental evidence about whether the “stakes” or importance of being wrong affect judgments about whether a subject knows a proposition. To date, judgments about stakes effects on knowledge have been investigated using binary paradigms: responses to “low” stakes cases are compared with responses to “high stakes” cases. However, stakes or importance are not binary properties—they are scalar: whether a situation is “high” or “low” stakes is a matter of degree. So far, no experimental work has investigated the (...)
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  2.  7
    Learning Through Clamor: The Allocation and Perception of Study Time in Noise.Maciej Hanczakowski, C. Philip Beaman & Dylan M. Jones - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (7):1005-1022.
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  3.  46
    Neurons Amongst the Symbols?C. Philip Beaman - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):468-470.
    Page's target article presents an argument for the use of localist, connectionist models in future psychological theorising. The “manifesto” marshalls a set of arguments in favour of localist connectionism and against distributed connectionism, but in doing so misses a larger argument concerning the level of psychological explanation that is appropriate to a given domain.
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  4.  19
    The Size and Nature of a Chunk.C. Philip Beaman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):118-118.
    The data presented in the target article make a persuasive case for the notion that there is a fundamental limit on short term memory (STM) of about four items. Two possible means of further testing this claim are suggested and data regarding scene coherence and memory capacity for ordered information are reviewed.
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  5.  10
    The Separate but Related Origins of the Recency Effect and the Modality Effect in Free Recall.C. Philip Beaman & John Morton - 2000 - Cognition 77 (3):B59-B65.
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  6.  33
    From Base-Rate to Cumulative Respect.C. Philip Beaman & Rachel McCloy - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):256-257.
    The tendency to neglect base-rates in judgment under uncertainty may be as Barbey & Sloman (B&S) suggest, but it is neither inevitable (as they document; see also Koehler 1996) nor unique. Here we would like to point out another line of evidence connecting ecological rationality to dual processes, the failure of individuals to appropriately judge cumulative probability.
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  7.  19
    The Item Versus the Object in Memory: On the Implausibility of Overwriting As a Mechanism for Forgetting in Short-Term Memory.C. Philip Beaman & Dylan M. Jones - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  8.  20
    Why Are We Good at Detecting Cheaters? A Reply to Fodor.C. Philip Beaman - 2002 - Cognition 83 (2):215-220.
  9.  17
    The Relative Success of Recognition-Based Inference in Multichoice Decisions.Rachel McCloy, C. Philip Beaman & Philip T. Smith - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (6):1037-1048.
  10. Philip Kitcher.Philip Kitcher - unknown
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
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  11. An Augmented Buck-Passing Account of Reasons and Value: Scanlon and Crisp on What Stops the Buck: Philip Cook.Philip Cook - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (4):490-507.
    Roger Crisp has inspired two important criticisms of Scanlon's buck-passing account of value. I defend buck-passing from the wrong kind of reasons criticism, and the reasons and the good objection. I support Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen's dual role of reasons in refuting the wrong kind of reasons criticism, even where its authors claim it fails. Crisp's reasons and the good objection contends that the property of goodness is buck-passing in virtue of its formality. I argue that Crisp conflates general and formal (...)
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  12.  56
    The Economic Consequences of Philip Kitcher.Philip Mirowski - 1996 - Social Epistemology 10 (2):153 – 169.
  13.  53
    The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism: Philip E. Devine.Philip E. Devine - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (206):481-505.
    If someone abstains from meat-eating for reasons of taste or personal economics, no moral or philosophical question arises. But when a vegetarian attempts to persuade others that they, too, should adopt his diet, then what he says requires philosophical attention. While a vegetarian might argue in any number of ways, this essay will be concerned only with the argument for a vegetarian diet resting on a moral objection to the rearing and killing of animals for the human table. The vegetarian, (...)
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  14.  51
    A Plea for Risk: Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson.Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:45-64.
    Mountaineering is a dangerous activity. For many mountaineers, part of its very attraction is the risk, the thrill of danger. Yet mountaineers are often regarded as reckless or even irresponsible for risking their lives. In this paper, we offer a defence of risk-taking in mountaineering. Our discussion is organised around the fact that mountaineers and non-mountaineers often disagree about how risky mountaineering really is. We hope to cast some light on the nature of this disagreement – and to argue that (...)
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  15.  53
    Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory: Philip Mirowski.Philip Mirowski - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):67-95.
    Is rhetoric just a new and trendy way to épater les bourgeois? Unfortunately, I think that the newfound interest of some economists in rhetoric, and particularly Donald McCloskey in his new book and subsequent responses to critics, gives that impression. After economists have worked so hard for the past five decades to learn their sums, differential calculus, real analysis, and topology, it is a fair bet that one could easily hector them about their woeful ignorance of the conjugation of Latin (...)
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  16.  17
    Homicide Revisited: Philip E. Devine.Philip E. Devine - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (213):329-347.
    Jonathan Glover and I, while not in such deep disagreement about the ethics of killing as to make all communication impossible, still disagree enough to make sustained confrontation worthwhile. At minimum, such confrontation should make it clear what are the most fundamental issues at stake in ethical arguments about various kinds of killing.
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  17.  6
    Does St Anselm Beg the Question?: Philip E. Devine.Philip E. Devine - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (193):271-281.
    The following objection to the ‘ontological’ argument of St Anselm has a continuing importance. The argument begs the question by introducing into the first premise the name ‘God’. In order for something to be truly talked about, to have properties truly attributed to it—it has been said—it must exist; a statement containing a vacuous name must either be false, meaningless, or lacking in truth-value, if it is not a misleading formulation to be explained by paraphrase into other terms. In any (...)
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  18.  61
    Regarding Philip Clayton.Philip Rolnick - 2002 - Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):5-6.
    This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
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  19.  41
    Religious Obedience and Moral Autonomy: PHILIP L. QUINN.Philip L. Quinn - 1975 - Religious Studies 11 (3):265-281.
    It has become fashionable to try to prove the impossibility of there being a God. Findlay's celebrated ontological disproof has in the past quarter century given rise to vigorous controversy. More recently James Rachels has offered a moral argument intended to show that there could not be a being worthy of worship. In this paper I shall examine the position Rachels is arguing for in some detail. I shall endeavor to show that his argument is unsound and, more interestingly, that (...)
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  20.  44
    Kitcher, Philip., The Ethical Project.Philip E. Devine - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):579-581.
  21. ťIntroductionŤ, U: Philip Pettit & John McDowell (Ur.).Philip Pettit - 1986 - In John McDowell & Philip Pettit (eds.), Subject, Thought, and Context. Clarendon Press.
     
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  22.  22
    Divine Conservation and Spinozistic Pantheism: PHILIP L. QUINN.Philip L. Quinn - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (3):289-302.
    In a recent paper, Robert A. Oakes argues that a doctrine central to, and partially constitutive of, classical theism implies a certain sort of pantheism. The doctrine in question is a modal form of the claim that God conserves in existence the world of contingent things; alternatively, it is the view that all contingently existing things are necessarily continuously dependent upon God for their existence. And the variety of pantheism at stake is a modal form of the thesis that all (...)
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  23.  13
    Philip Cafaro Writes.Philip Cafaro - 2008 - Ethics and International Affairs 22 (3):248-254.
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  24. Science, Truth, and Democracy.Philip Kitcher - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Striving to boldly redirect the philosophy of science, this book by renowned philosopher Philip Kitcher examines the heated debate surrounding the role of science in shaping our lives. Kitcher explores the sharp divide between those who believe that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary--the purists--and those who believe that it invariably serves the interests of people in positions of power. In a daring turn, he rejects both perspectives, working out a more realistic image of the (...)
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  25. The Division of Cognitive Labor.Philip Kitcher - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):5-22.
  26. Dictionary of the History of Ideas Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas. Philip P. Wiener, Editor in Chief.Philip P. Wiener - 1973
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  27. "Philip C. Ritterbush", Overtures to Biology. [REVIEW]Philip Merlan - 1965 - Dialogue 3 (4):438.
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  28. The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion.Philip Clayton & Paul Davies (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume introduces readers to emergence theory, outlines the major arguments in its defence, and summarizes the most powerful objections against it. It provides the clearest explication yet of this exciting new theory of science, which challenges the reductionist approach by proposing the continuous emergence of novel phenomena.
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  29.  49
    The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics (1964).Philip E. Converse - 2006 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 18 (1-3):1-74.
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  30.  61
    Creation and Evolution: PHILIP E. DEVINE.Philip E. Devine - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (3):325-337.
    Despite the bad reputation of the legal profession, law remains king in America. A highly diverse society relies on the laws to maintain a working sense of the dignity and inviability of each individual. And a persistent element in contemporary debates is the fear that naturalistic theories of the human person will erode our belief that we have a dignity greater than that of other natural objects. Thus the endurance of the creation vs. evolution debate is due less to the (...)
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  31.  17
    Statistical Reporting with Philip's Sextuple and Extended Sextuple: A Simple Method for Easy Communication of Findings.Philip Tromovitch - 2012 - Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - P2.
    The advance of science and human knowledge is impeded by misunderstandings of various statistics, insufficient reporting of findings, and the use of numerous standardized and non-standardized presentations of essentially identical information. Communication with journalists and the public is hindered by the failure to present statistics that are easy for non-scientists to interpret as well as by use of the word significant, which in scientific English does not carry the meaning of "important" or "large." This article promotes a new standard method (...)
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  32.  50
    On the People’s Terms.Philip Pettit - 2012 - Political Theory 44 (5):697-706.
  33.  22
    Habermas on Truth and Justice: Philip Pettit.Philip Pettit - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 14:207-228.
    The problem which motivates this paper bears on the relationship between Marxism and morality. It is not the well-established question of whether the Marxist's commitments undermine an attachment to ethical standards, but the more neglected query as to whether they allow the espousal of political ideals. The study and assessment of political ideals is pursued nowadays under the title of theory of justice, the aim of such theory being to provide a criterion for distinguishing just patterns of social organization from (...)
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  34.  45
    The Institute of Medicine’s Reports on Quality and Safety: Paradoxes and Tensions. [REVIEW]George Khushf, James Raymond & Charles Beaman - 2008 - HEC Forum 20 (1):1-14.
  35. Commentary by Philip Hebert, M.D.Philip Hebert - 1998 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 8 (4):107-107.
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  36.  27
    Some Problems About Resurrection: PHILIP L. QUINN.Philip L. Quinn - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (3):343-359.
    Suppose that a person P 1 dies some time during 1978. Many years later, the resurrection world, a perennial object of Christian concern, begins on the morning of the day of judgment. On its first morning there are in that world distinct persons, P 2 and P 3 , each of whom is related in remarkably intimate ways to P 1 . You are to imagine that each of them satisfies each of the criteria or conditions necessary for identity with (...)
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  37.  37
    Elements of a Plan‐Based Theory of Speech Acts.Philip R. Cohen & C. Raymond Perrault - 1979 - Cognitive Science 3 (3):177-212.
    This paper explores the truism that people think about what they say. It proposes that, to satisfy their own goals, people often plan their speech acts to affect their listeners' beliefs, goals, and emotional states. Such language use can be modelled by viewing speech acts as operators in a planning system, thus allowing both physical and speech acts to be integrated into plans. Methodological issues of how speech acts should be defined in a planbased theory are illustrated by defining operators (...)
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  38. A Posteriori Physicalists Get Our Phenomenal Concepts Wrong.Philip Goff - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):191 - 209.
    Dualists say plausible things about our mental concepts: there is a way of thinking of pain, in terms of how it feels, which is independent of causal role. Physicalists make attractive ontological claims: the world is wholly physical. The attraction of a posteriori physicalism is that it has seemed to do both: to agree with the dualist about our mental concepts, whilst retaining a physicalist ontology. In this paper I argue that, in fact, a posteriori physicalism departs from the dualist's (...)
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  39. Critical Notice: Philip Kitcher and Wesley C. Salmon,(Eds.), Scientific Explanation; and Wesley C. Salmon, Four Decades of Scientific Explanation* James H. Fetzert. [REVIEW]Philip Kitcher - 1991 - In Richard Boyd, Philip Gasper & J. D. Trout (eds.), The Philosophy of Science. MIT Press. pp. 58--288.
     
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  40.  3
    Intention is Choice with Commitment.Philip R. Cohen & Hector J. Levesque - 1990 - Artificial Intelligence 42 (2-3):213-261.
  41.  20
    Realism and Truth.Philip Gasper - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (3):446.
  42. Anticipatory Ethics for Emerging Technologies.Philip A. E. Brey - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (1):1-13.
    Abstract In this essay, a new approach for the ethical study of emerging technology ethics will be presented, called anticipatory technology ethics (ATE). The ethics of emerging technology is the study of ethical issues at the R&D and introduction stage of technology development through anticipation of possible future devices, applications, and social consequences. I will argue that a major problem for its development is the problem of uncertainty, which can only be overcome through methodologically sound forecasting and futures studies. I (...)
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  43.  1
    The Will to Religion: Obligatory Religious Citizenship.Lori G. Beaman - 2013 - Critical Research on Religion 1 (2):141-157.
    This article takes up the problematic of the ‘new normal’ and its necessary twin, the ‘will to religion’. The notion of the ‘new normal’ describes the shift to the persistent presence, indeed requirement, for religious assessment in all manner of public and institutional life. The idea of the will to religion reflects a broadly Foucauldian perspective on the care of the self and the requirement to confess—in this instance to confess one’s belonging to a religious category. The article calls for (...)
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  44.  34
    Intentions in Communication.Philip R. Cohen, Jerry Morgan & Martha E. Pollack - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):245-247.
    This paper explores principles governing the rational balance among an agent's beliefs, goals, actions, and intentions. Such principles provide specifications for artificial agents, and approximate a theory of human action (as philosophers use the term). By making explicit the conditions under which an agent can drop his goals, i.e., by specifying how the agent is committed to his goals, the formalism captures a number of important properties of intention. Specifically, the formalism provides analyses for Bratman's three characteristic functional roles played (...)
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  45. The Problem of God in Modern Thought.Philip Clayton - 2001 - Ars Disputandi 1.
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  46.  2
    Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn.Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.) - 2008 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Philip Quinn, John A. O’Brien Professor at the University of Notre Dame from 1985 until his death in 2004, was well known for his work in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, and core areas of analytic philosophy. Although the breadth of his interests was so great that it would be virtually impossible to identify any subset of them as representative, the contributors to this volume provide an excellent introduction to, and advance the discussion of, some of the questions (...)
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  47. Real Realism: The Galilean Strategy.Philip Kitcher - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (2):151-197.
    This essay aims to disentangle various types of anti-realism, and to disarm the considerations that are deployed to support them. I distinguish empiricist versions of anti-realism from constructivist versions, and, within each of these, semantic arguments from epistemological arguments. The centerpiece of my defense of a modest version of realism - real realism - is the thought that there are resources within our ordinary ways of talking about and knowing about everyday objects that enable us to extend our claims to (...)
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  48.  42
    Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction of Philosophy.Philip Kitcher - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    In these essays, distinguished philosopher Philip Kitcher argues for a reconstruction of philosophy along the lines of classical Pragmatism.
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  49.  99
    The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science.Philip Mirowski - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge” is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy” are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of science tend to be (...)
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  50.  6
    The Religious Significance of the Ontological Argument: PHILIP E.DEVINE.Philip E. Devine - 1975 - Religious Studies 11 (1):97-116.
    It seems clear that the ontological argument can no longer be dismissed as a silly fallacy. The dogma of the impossibility of necessary existence is seriously threatened by the case of necessary existential truths in mathematics, and as for the claim that the ontological argument must beg the question, since by mentioning God in the premise his existence is presupposed, it is undermined by the fact that we often refer to things—Hamlet for instance— we do not for a moment think (...)
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