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Philip Hefner [118]Philip J. Hefner [3]
  1. The Human Factor: Evolution, Culture, and Religion.Philip Hefner - 1993
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  2.  64
    Technology and Human Becoming.Philip Hefner - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3):655-666.
    Technology is a mirror that reflects human nature and intentions: we want certain things done and we want tools to do those things; we are finite, frail, and mortal; we create technology in order to bring alternative worlds into being; we do not know why we create or what values should guide us. Imagination is central to technology. Human nature and human freedom are brought into focus when we reflect on the central role of imagination in technology.
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  3.  59
    Ralph Burhoe: Reconsidering the man and his vision of yoking religion and science.Philip Hefner - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):629-641.
    Ralph Wendell Burhoe was a leading figure in relating religion and science in the second half of the twentieth century. His autodidactic style and character as a public intellectual resulted in a vision that is comprehensive in its concern for the salvation of society. He does not fit easily into academic frameworks, even though he has been influential upon scholars who work in academia. This article discusses some conundrums posed by his work. There are also brief presentations of the concerns (...)
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  4.  2
    Philosophical Darwinism: On the Origin of Knowledge by Means of Natural Selection.Peter Munz & Philip Hefner - 1993 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 15 (2):210-216.
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  5.  46
    Discerning the voice of zygon: Identity and issues.Philip Hefner - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):419-429.
    The challenge to the journal Zygon as suggested here is to respond to three different reference groups: public intellectuals, academia, and religious communities. An extended discussion follows of what I term the situation of irony in which religion-and-science finds itself. I argue that this situation of irony actually constitutes the domain in which our greatest contributions can be offered.
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  6.  33
    Theology's truth and scientific formulation.Philip Hefner - 1988 - Zygon 23 (3):263-279.
    One of the basic intentions of theology is to extend the explanatory function of the community's faith beyond the community to the realm of wider human experience. In this sense, theology may be called “scientific,’and it will benefit from conforming as much as possible to the characteristics of scientific theory formation. Using the work of Karl Popper and Imre Lakatos as a guide, the following theological theory is proposed: Homo sapiens is God's created co‐creator, whose purpose is the stretching/enabling of (...)
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  7. Embodied science: Recentering religion-and-science.Philip Hefner - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):251-263.
    Neither religion nor science is first of all a realm of pure ideas, even though religion-and-science discussions often assume that they are. I propose that a concept of embodied science is more adequate and that religion-and-science should center its attention on science as enabler for improving the world (SEIW). This idea of science is rooted in Jerome Ravetz's concept of industrialized science and Donna Haraway's technoscience. SEIW describes the sociocultural context of science in commercial, government, and university settings. The chief (...)
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  8.  43
    Myth and morality: The love command.Philip Hefner - 1991 - Zygon 26 (1):115-136.
    Following in general a history of religions analysis, the paper argues that myth lays a basis for morality in that it sets forth a picture of “how things really are” (the is), to which humans seek to conform their actions (morality, the ought). A parallel argument locates the capacity for morality and values orientation in the process of evolution itself. A hypothesis is formulated concerning the function of myth in the emergence of Homo sapiens, namely, to motivate the action required (...)
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  9.  32
    The role of science in Pannenberg's theogical thinking.Philip Hefner - 1989 - Zygon 24 (2):135-151.
    Employing categories derived from the philosopher of science Imre Lakatos, this essay analyzes the theological thought of Wolfhart Pannenberg, with the aim of showing that he is engaged in a research program that takes seriously the various sciences and their understanding of the world on the one hand and the traditions of Christian faith and theology on the other. The course of the argument demonstrates that Pannenberg's thought extends comprehensively to provide a conceptuality that centers on the phenomena of contingency (...)
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  10.  29
    Broad experience? Great audience?Philip Hefner - 2007 - Zygon 42 (1):3-6.
  11. The Created Co-Creator as Symbol.Philip Hefner - forthcoming - Zygon.
  12. Religion and science-two way traffic?Philip Hefner - 2006 - Zygon 41 (1):3-6.
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  13. Religion-and-science, the third community.Philip Hefner - 2008 - Zygon 43 (1):3-8.
  14.  29
    Part 2. poems.Christopher Southgate, Gregory J. Feist, Joel Garreau, Joan D. Koss-Chioino, Philip Hefner, Trinh Xuan Thuan, Amos Yong, Matthieu Ricard, C. S. Peirce & Stuart Kauffman - 2007 - Zygon 42 (3-4):1027.
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  15.  32
    The self-definition of life and human purpose: Reflections upon the divine spirit and the human spirit.Philip Hefner - 1973 - Zygon 8 (3-4):395-411.
  16.  52
    The evolutionary epic.Philip Hefner - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):3-8.
  17. Religion and science: Separateness or co-inherence?Philip Hefner - 2006 - Zygon 41 (4):781-784.
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  18. How Science Is a Resource and a Challenge for Religion: Perspective of a Theologian.Philip Hefner - 2002 - Zygon 37 (1):55-62.
    Religion is characterized by the attempt to create a worldview, which is in effect the effort of worldbuilding. By this I mean that religion aims to focus on all of the elements that make up a person's world or a community's world and put those elements together in a manner that actually constructs a total picture that gives meaning and coherence to life. In this activity of worldbuilding, science and religion meet each other at the deepest level. Science makes a (...)
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  19. Science-and-religion and the search for meaning.Philip Hefner - 1996 - Zygon 31 (2):307-321.
    A survey and interpretation is offered of the broad range of contemporary thinking that concerns itself with the relationships between religion and science. The survey consists of a spectrum of six types of thought: (1) The modern option: translating religious wisdom into scientific concepts; (2) the postmodern/new‐age option: constructing new science‐based myths; (3) the critical post‐Enlightenment option: expressing the truth at the obscure margin of science; (4) the postmodern constructivist option: fashioning a new metaphysics for scientific knowledge; (5) the constructivist (...)
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  20.  41
    Entrusting the life that has evolved: A response to Michael Ruse's Ruse.Philip Hefner - 1994 - Zygon 29 (1):67-73.
    This piece challenges Michael Ruse on three points: (1) The charge that Christian myth and doctrine are incredible fails to take into account the scholarship that has clarified the genre to which myth belongs and its function. (2) Naturalistic explanations, like Ruse's, have fully as much difficulty dealing with questions of purpose and evil as religion does. (3) The concept of “deception” has a number of inherent problems that Ruse fails to consider, of which the chief is that it requires (...)
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  21.  45
    God and chaos: The demiurge versus the ungrund.Philip Hefner - 1984 - Zygon 19 (4):469-485.
    The human quest for meaning is an attempt to bring experience into conjunction with illuminating concepts. The second law of thermodynamics is of wide human concern, because it touches experience which is existentially charged and therefore which humans must interpret in broad metaphysical terms. Five types of experience have been incorporated into the second law: running down, degeneracy, mixed‐up‐ness, irreversibility of time, and emergence of new possibilities. The dominant Western tradition (Plato) places these experiences within a metaphysical scheme that evaluates (...)
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  22.  28
    Is/ought: A risky relationship between theology and science.Philip Hefner - 1980 - Zygon 15 (4):377-395.
  23.  38
    Pannenberg's Fundamental Challenges to Theology and Science.Philip Hefner - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):801-808.
    This paper is a response to Wolfhart Pannenberg's “God as Spirit—and Natural Science” (2001). I argue that the distinctiveness and significance of Pannenberg's approach to the conversation between theology and science lies in his method of relating biblical‐theological concepts specifically and directly to scientific knowledge and theories. The example at issue in this paper is his correlation of the biblical‐theological term spirit to the scientific term field. This approach is both distinctive and the most difficult of challenges. However, it results (...)
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  24.  38
    Toward a new doctrine of man: The relationship of man and nature.Philip Hefner - 1967 - Zygon 2 (2):127-151.
  25. Concluding Dialogue: Challenging the Past, Grasping the Future.Antje Jackelén & Philip Hefner - 2004 - Zygon 39 (2):401-412.
    . A dialogue between the outgoing and incoming directors of the Zygon Center for Religion and Science took place as part of the inaugural symposium. In their conversation they speak of the past and present challenges and goals of the Center, outline what is foremost in their minds, and offer glimpses into what they see as the Center’s priorities for future work.
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  26. The Necessity for a Theology of Disease: Reflections on Totalities and Fragments.Philip Hefner - 2004 - Zygon 39 (2):487-496.
    . Our ideas of disease try to explain it, and they aim at facilitating cures. In the process, they become entwined in sociocultural networks that have totalizing effects. Disease, however, counters this totalizing effect by revealing to us that our lives are fragments. Unless we engage this fragment character of disease and of our lives, we cannot properly understand disease or deal with it. HIV/AIDS clarifies these issues in an extraordinarily powerful fashion. Medical, legal, commercial, political, and institutional approaches to (...)
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  27.  73
    A Fuller concept of evolution—big Bang to spirit.Philip Hefner - 2012 - Zygon 47 (2):298-307.
    Abstract The concept of evolution challenges us to an ongoing effort to interpret its significance. The challenge has several dimensions: (1) to calm the debate that divides Americans in arguing whether evolution is at odds with biblical traditions; (2) to integrate evolution into one's personal philosophy of life or religious faith; (3) to note the importance of the story form for rendering evolution; and (4) to evaluate evolution as a creation story. Evolution is portrayed as a drama in five acts: (...)
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  28. Religion-and-science: Never alone, always in a crowd.Philip Hefner - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):291-296.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712254; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 562-576.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 576.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  29. William R. LaFleur.Willem B. Drees, Philip Hefner, Rustum Roy, John A. Teske, H. Cyberpsychology & Terence L. Nichols Why Miracles - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3-4):768.
     
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  30.  50
    Zygon, evolving.Willem B. Drees & Philip Hefner - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):497-500.
  31.  49
    An idea of nature: A bipolar proposal.Philip Hefner - 2015 - Zygon 50 (2):287-303.
    This article argues that in order to understand nature, we depend on a basic idea or ideal type of nature, following R. G. Collingwood's work The Idea of Nature. Collingwood asserted that the prevailing idea of nature in Western thought evolved through three analogies for understanding nature: living organism, machine, and historical process. His use of the concept of idea is comparable to the use of ideal type proposed by Max Weber and Ernst Troeltsch. This article is a bipolar proposal: (...)
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  32.  44
    A new feature.Philip Hefner - 1996 - Zygon 31 (2):305-306.
  33.  35
    Culture is where it happens.Philip Hefner - 2005 - Zygon 40 (3):523-528.
  34.  37
    Can nature truly be our friend?Philip Hefner - 1994 - Zygon 29 (4):507-528.
    . The question of whether nature can embody love or be considered in this sense as “friend” is a thorny problem for Christian theology. The doctrines of finitude and sin argue against nature as a realm of love, whereas the doctrine of creation out of nothing, which links God and the creation so forcefully, would seem to argue for such a view of nature. This paper explores the thesis that Western culture has not offered a concept of nature rich enough (...)
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  35. Discussion: Rethinking Christian Theology in Light of Science.Philip Hefner - forthcoming - Zygon.
  36.  13
    Dialogue, Yoking, and the Common Good.Philip Hefner - 2005 - Zygon 40 (4):793-798.
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  37.  58
    Editorials.Philip Hefner - 2000 - Zygon 35 (4):721-723.
  38. Faith and the Vitalities of History.Philip Hefner & Jaroslav Pelikan - 1966
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  39.  30
    Genetic frontiers: Challenges for humanity and our religious traditions.Philip Hefner - 2007 - Zygon 42 (1):183-192.
    Abstract.Genetic research and its applications pose a significant challenge today, in particular to religious communities. The most critical challenge is to our understanding of human nature and values. This article surveys the challenges and the resources that the monotheistic religions can bring to bear in response. It is important for those religious communities to communicate to the larger society both their common beliefs and values and the diversity among them.
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  40.  35
    Human being: Questioning and being questioned.Philip Hefner - 2004 - Zygon 39 (4):733-736.
  41.  42
    It's all about transforming minds.Philip Hefner - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):263-266.
  42.  58
    Introduction to the Symposium.Philip Hefner - 2004 - Zygon 39 (2):357-358.
  43.  42
    Nature, God's great project.Philip Hefner - 1992 - Zygon 27 (3):327-341.
  44.  46
    Ralph Burhoe's Evolutionary Theory of Religion.Philip Hefner - 1998 - Zygon 33 (1):165-169.
    Ralph Wendell Burhoe's legacy rests on a series of interrelated theories that deal with (1) the emergence of life within physical nature; (2) the symbiosis of genes and cultures in human evolution; (3) the central importance of the brain in this symbiosis; and (4) the function of religion within this evolutionary process to carry the traditions of trans‐kin altruism that make human civilization possible. These theories give rise to a number of issues that are of current importance. Burhoe's stature is (...)
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  45.  41
    Religion in the Context of Culture, Theology, and Global Ethics.Philip Hefner - 2003 - Zygon 38 (1):185-195.
    The theme of this symposium is distinctive and challenging, because it incorporates the dimensions of interreligious reflection, theology, science, and ethics. This article presents a palette of issues that are both challenge and resource for approaching the theme. Three sets of issues are considered: (1) the role of religion in culture, (2) theological interpretation of nature, disease, and evil, and (3) the fashioning of a global ethic.
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  46.  39
    Survival as a human value.Philip Hefner - 1980 - Zygon 15 (2):203-212.
  47.  55
    Science and religion: Athens and jerusalem in dialogue about athens' salvation.Philip Hefner - 1979 - Zygon 14 (3):217-228.
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  48.  40
    Science and the Religions: Introduction to the Symposium.Philip Hefner - 2002 - Zygon 37 (1):35-36.
  49.  26
    Science and the big questions.Philip Hefner - 2007 - Zygon 42 (2):265-268.
  50.  2
    Buddhism and Science: Allies or Enemies?Philip Hefner, James F. Moore, Solomon H. Katz, Vlggo Mortensen, Varadaraja V. Raman, C. Mackenzie Brown & Pinit Ratanakul - 2002 - Zygon 37 (1):115-120.
    Buddhist teachings and modern science are analogous both in their approach to the search for truth and in some of the discoveries of contemporary physics, biology, and psychology. However, despite these congruencies and the recognized benefits of science, Buddhism reminds us of the dangers of a tendency toward scientific reductionism and imperialism and of the sciences’ inability to deal with human moral and spiritual values and needs. Buddhism and science have human concerns and final goals that are different, but as (...)
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