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Philip L. Quinn [120]Philip Quinn [14]Philip Lawrence Quinn [1]
  1. John J. Davenport, Anthony Rudd, Alasdair C. Macintyre & Philip L. Quinn (2001). Kierkegaard After Macintyre Essays on Freedom, Narrative, and Virtue.
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  2.  7
    Philip Quinn (1972). Methodological Appraisal and Heuristic Advice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):135-149.
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  3. Philip L. Quinn (1978). Divine Commands and Moral Requirements. Clarendon Press.
    In this wide-ranging study, Quinn argues that human moral autonomy is compatible with unqualified obedience to divine commands. He formulates several versions of the crucial assumptions of divine command ethics, defending them against a battery of objections often expressed in the philosophical literature.
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  4. William P. Alston, Laurence Bonjour, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff & Linda Zagzebski (2005). Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most influential analytic philosophers of the late twentieth century, William P. Alston is a leading light in epistemology, philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of language. In this volume, twelve leading philosophers critically discuss the central topics of his work in these areas, including perception, epistemic circularity, justification, the problem of religious diversity, and truth.
     
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  5. Philip L. Quinn (1996). Theism, Atheism, and Big Bang Cosmology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):733-736.
  6.  51
    Philip L. Quinn & Vincent C. Müller (1998). Auf der Suche nach den Fundamenten des Theismus [In Search of the Foundations of Theism]. In Christoph Jäger (ed.), Analytische Religionsphilosophie. Ferdinand Schöningh. pp. 331-353.
    Dieser Aufsatz ist eine kritische und erkundende Diskussion von Plantingas Behauptung, daß bestimmte Aussagen, aus denen evidentermaßen folgt, daß Gott existiert, berechtigterweise basal sein könnten. Im kritischen Abschnitt argumentiere ich dafür, daß es Plantinga nicht gelingt zu zeigen, daß das Kriterium des modernen Fundamentalisten für berechtigte Basalität, dem zufolge solche Aussagen nicht berechtigterweise basal sein können, selbstreferentiell inkohärent oder anderweitig mangelhaft ist. Im erkundenden Abschnitt versuche ich, ein Argument für die Auffassung zu entwickeln, daß solche Aussagen, selbst wenn sie berechtigterweise (...)
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  7. Philip L. Quinn (1990). An Argument for Divine Command Ethics. In Michael D. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. Notre Dame Up.
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  8.  61
    L. Quinn Philip (2006). Essays in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together fourteen of the best papers by the late Philip Quinn, one of the world's leading philosophers of religion. It covers the following topics: religious epistemology, religious ethics, religion and tragic dilemmas, religion and political liberalism, topics in Christian philosophy, and religious diversity.
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  9. Philip L. Quinn (1991). Epistemic Parity and Religious Argument. Philosophical Perspectives 5:317-341.
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  10.  35
    Charles Taliaferro, Paul Draper & Philip L. Quinn (eds.) (2010). A Companion to Philosophy of Religion. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In 85 new and updated essays, this comprehensive volume provides an authoritative guide to the philosophy of religion. Includes contributions from established philosophers and rising stars 22 new entries have now been added, and all material from the previous edition has been updated and reorganized Broad coverage spans the areas of world religions, theism, atheism,, the problem of evil, science and religion, and ethics.
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  11.  21
    Philip L. Quinn (1995). Political Liberalisms and Their Exclusions of the Religious. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):35 - 56.
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  12.  81
    Philip L. Quinn (2001). Religious Diversity and Religious Toleration. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 50 (1/3):57-80.
  13. Philip L. Quinn (1984). The Philosopher of Science as Expert Witness. In James T. Cushing, C. F. Delany & Gary M. Gutting (eds.), Science and Reality: Recent Work in the Philosophy of Science. University of Notre Dame Press.
  14. Philip L. Quinn & Kevin Meeker (eds.) (2000). The Philosophical Challenge of Religious Diversity. Oxford University Press.
    This unique volume collects some of the best recent work on the philosophical challenge that religious diversity poses for religious belief. Featuring contributors from philosophy, religious studies, and theology, it is unified by the way in which many of the authors engage in sustained critical examination of one another's positions. John Hick's pluralism provides one focal point of the collection. Hick argues that all the major religious traditions make contact with the same ultimate reality, each encountering it through a variety (...)
     
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  15.  8
    Eric Hoffman, Philip L. Quinn, Robert Audi & Martha Nussbaum (1995). Challenges to Philosophy and Its Organizations. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):133 - 146.
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  16.  67
    Philip L. Quinn (1990). The Recent Revival of Divine Command Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:345-365.
  17. Kevin Meeker & Philip Quinn (eds.) (1999). The Philosophical Challenge of Religious Diversity. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  18.  40
    Philip L. Quinn (1995). Towards Thinner Theologies: Hick and Alston on Religious Diversity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 38 (1/3):145 - 164.
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  19.  46
    Philip L. Quinn (1985). In Search of the Foundations of Theism. Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):469-486.
    This paper is a critical and exploratory discussion of Plantinga’s claim that certain propositions which self-evidently entail the existence of God could be properly basic. In the critical section, I argue that Plantinga fails to show that the modem foundationalist’s criterion for proper basicality, according to which such propositions could not be properly basic, is self-referentially incoherent or otherwise defective. In the exploratory section, I try to build a case for the view that, even if such propositions could be properly (...)
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  20. Charles Taliaferro & Philip Quinn (eds.) (1997). Oxford Companion to the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  21.  10
    Philip Quinn & Charles Taliaferro (eds.) (1997). Companion to Philosophy of Religion. Oxford: Blackwell.
    In over 78 newly-commissioned essays, this outstanding volume provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the philosophy of religion. Written by many of today's leading figures, the volume surveys philosophical issues in the religions of the world, philosophical thought about religion in Western history, and important currents in twentieth-century philosophy of religion.
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  22. Philip L. Quinn (2000). Divine Command Theory. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell. pp. 53--73.
     
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  23.  55
    Philip L. Quinn (1986). Christian Atonement and Kantian Justification. Faith and Philosophy 3 (4):440-462.
    THIS PAPER IS A STUDY OF KANT’S ATTEMPT TO RECONSTRUCT THE CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE OF ATONEMENT WITHIN THE LIMITS OF REASON. IT BEGINS WITH A BRIEF SKETCH OF ANSELM’S SATISFACTION-THEORETIC ACCOUNT OF ATONEMENT AND THEN PRESENTS THE MAIN OBJECTIONS TO THAT ACCOUNT. NEXT KANT’S ACCOUNT OF ATONEMENT IS GIVEN A DETAILED EXPOSITION, AND IT IS SHOWN THAT IT AVOIDS THE DIFFICULTIES THAT PLAGUE ANSELM’S ACCOUNT. KANT’S ACCOUNT IS THEN SUBJECTED TO CRITICISM.
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  24.  50
    Philip L. Quinn (1990). Symposia Papers: Does Anxiety Explain Original Sin? Noûs 24 (2):227-244.
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  25.  1
    Philip L. Quinn (2005). Religious Diversity: Familiar Problems, Novel Opportunities. In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 392--417.
    This chapter surveys recent work on philosophical issues raised by religious diversity or pluralism. It focuses on four topics. The first is the epistemological challenge of religious diversity. The rationality of commitment to any particular religious tradition seems to be threatened by the existence of rival traditions. The second is the political problem of religious toleration. Religious conflict throughout the world suggests a need for better arguments against religious intolerance than those currently available. The third is the task of understanding (...)
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  26.  77
    Philip L. Quinn (1979). Book Review:Religion and Scientific Method George Schlesinger. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 46 (1):170-.
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  27. Philip L. Quinn (1994). Swinburne on Guilt, Atonement and Christian Redemption. In Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.), Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press.
     
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  28.  37
    Philip L. Quinn (1982). Metaphysical Necessity and Modal Logics. The Monist 65 (4):444-455.
  29.  53
    Philip L. Quinn (1999). Epistemological Problems of Religious Pluralism. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:19-27.
    The world religions make conflicting claims about the nature of ultimate reality, and they all appeal to experience for justification of their claims. The experiential justifications for conflicting religious beliefs thus seem to be mutually destructive. One response to this situation, advocated by John Hick, is to reinterpret traditional religious claims in ways that eliminate the conflicts; another, favored by William P. Alston, is to defend the rationality of continuing, despite the conflicts, to engage in the doxastic practice of one’s (...)
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  30.  51
    Philip L. Quinn (1992). The Primacy of God's Will in Christian Ethics. Philosophical Perspectives 6:493-513.
  31. Philip L. Quinn (1983). The Existence & Nature of God. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
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  32. Philip L. Quinn (1996). Relativism About Torture: Religious and Secular Responses. In D. Z. Phillips (ed.), Religion and Morality. St. Martin's Press. pp. 151--70.
     
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  33.  59
    Philip L. Quinn (1978). Divine Foreknowledge and Divine Freedom. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):219 - 240.
  34.  16
    Philip L. Quinn (1986). Understanding Identity Statements. Faith and Philosophy 3 (4):468-471.
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  35.  10
    Philip Quinn (1993). Abelard on Atonement: Nothing Unintelligible, Arbitrary, Illogical, or Immoral About It'. In E. Stump (ed.), Reasoned Faith. Cornell Univ Pr.
    This paper is devoted to discussion of Abelard’s account of the Christian doctrine of the Atonement. It defends his account against charges of Exemplarism and Pelagianism. It also argues that his account contains material that ought to be incorporated into Christian thinking about the Atonement. Abelard’s constructive contribution to such thinking is the idea that divine love, made manifest in the life and death of Jesus, has the power to transform human sinners, if they cooperate, in ways that fit them (...)
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  36.  32
    Philip L. Quinn (1984). Original Sin, Radical Evil and Moral Identity. Faith and Philosophy 1 (2):188-202.
  37.  63
    Philip L. Quinn (1990). Duhem in Different Contexts: Comments on Brenner and Martin. Synthese 83 (3):357 - 362.
    These comments consist of reflections on the papers Anastasios Brenner and R. N. D. Martin presented at the Conference on Pierre Duhem: Historian and Philosopher of Science. I argue they present nicely complementary accounts of Duhem's turn to history of science: Brenner emphasizes reasons internal to Duhem's philosophical concern with scientific methodology while Martin highlights reasons derived from the broader context of Duhem's engagement with religious controversies of his culture. I go on to suggest that seeing Duhem in this broader (...)
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  38. Philip L. Quinn & Charles Taliaferro (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell.
  39.  13
    Philip L. Quinn (2000). Kantian Philosophical Ecclesiology. Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):512-534.
    This paper begins with an outline of some of the main themes in the ecclesiology Kant presents in Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone. It then discusses implications of Kant’s ecclesiology for issues concerning scriptural interpretation and religious toleration. With the help of these implications, an objection to Kant’s ecclesiology is developed, and a Kantian ecclesiology modified in response to the objection is sketched out. The Roman Catholic ecclesiology of the Second Vatican Council is compared to both Kant’s ecclesiology (...)
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  40.  56
    Philip L. Quinn (1974). The Transitivity of Non-Standard Synchronisms. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (1):78-82.
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  41.  17
    Philip L. Quinn (1977). Improved Foundations for a Logic of Intrinsic Value. Philosophical Studies 32 (1):73 - 81.
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  42.  4
    Philip L. Quinn (1974). What Duhem Really Meant. In R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), Methodological and Historical Essays in the Natural and Social Sciences. Boston: Reidel. pp. 33--56.
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  43.  53
    Philip L. Quinn (2002). Obligation, Divine Commands and Abriham's Dilemma. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):459–466.
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  44.  15
    Philip L. Quinn (1969). The Status of the D-Thesis. Philosophy of Science 36 (4):381-399.
    Some of the controversy surrounding the Duhemian claim that in science falsification is as inconclusive as verification is reconsidered. The D-Thesis, a particular version of this claim first discussed by Adolf Grünbaum, is formulated in a more precise and perspicuous fashion as a conjunction of two subtheses. Grünbaum's attempt to refute one of the subtheses by means of a geometrical counterexample and some subsequent discussions of this example are examined critically. An argument designed to prove the other subthesis is analyzed (...)
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  45. Philip L. Quinn (2000). Atonement, Theories Of. In Adrian Hastings, Alistair Mason & Hugh Pyper (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Christian Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 51--52.
     
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  46.  6
    Philip L. Quinn (1996). Pluralism in Philosophy Departments. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 70 (2):168 - 172.
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  47.  16
    Pamela Sue Anderson, Hent DeVries, David Ray Griffin, William Hasker, Fergus Kerr, John Macquarrie, Adrian Peperzak, Philip L. Quinn, William J. Wainwright & Keith Ward (2005). Part One: Articles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58:207-214.
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  48.  28
    Philip L. Quinn (1995). What is God? Teaching Philosophy 18 (1):73-75.
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  49. Philip QUinn (2000). The Meaning of Life According to Christianity. In E. D. Klemke (ed.), The Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press. pp. 57--64.
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  50.  31
    Philip L. Quinn (2003). Gale on a Pragmatic Argument for Religious Belief. Philo 6 (1):59-66.
    This paper is a study of a pragmatic argument for belief in the existence of God constructed and criticized by Richard Gale. The argument’s conclusion is that religious belief is morally permissible under certain circumstances. Gale contends that this moral permission is defeated in the circumstances in question both because it violates the principle of universalizability and because belief produces an evil that outweighs the good it promotes. My counterargument tries to show that neither of the reasons invoked by Gale (...)
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