Results for 'Philip Reed Rulon'

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  1.  10
    Is “Aid in Dying” Suicide?Philip Reed - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (2):123-139.
    The practice whereby terminally ill patients choose to end their own lives painlessly by ingesting a drug prescribed by a physician has commonly been referred to as physician-assisted suicide. There is, however, a strong trend forming that seeks to deny that this act should properly be termed suicide. The purpose of this paper is to examine and reject the view that the term suicide should be abandoned in reference to what has been called physician-assisted suicide. I argue that there are (...)
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  2. How Not to Defend the Unborn.David B. Hershenov & Philip Reed - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    It is sometimes proposed that killing or harming abortion providers is the only logically consistent position available to opponents of abortion. Since lethal violence against morally responsible attackers is normally viewed as justified in order to defend innocent parties, pro-lifers should also think so in the case of the abortion doctor and so they should act to defend the unborn. In our paper, we defend the mainstream pro-life view against killing abortion doctors. We argue that the pro-life view can, in (...)
     
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  3.  41
    Empirical Adequacy and Virtue Ethics.Philip A. Reed - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):343-357.
    Situationists contend that virtue ethics is empirically inadequate. However, it is my contention that there is much confusion over what “empirical adequacy” or “empirical inadequacy” actually means in this context. My aim in this paper is to clarify the meanings of empirical adequacy in order to see to what extent virtue ethics might fail to meet this standard. I argue that the situationists frequently misconstrue the empirical commitments of virtue ethics. More importantly, depending on what we mean by empirical adequacy, (...)
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  4. What's Wrong with Monkish Virtues? Hume on the Standard of Virtue.Philip A. Reed - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (1).
     
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  5.  17
    Artifacts, Intentions, and Contraceptives: The Problem with Having a Plan B for Plan B.Philip A. Reed - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):jht051.
    Next SectionIt is commonly proposed that artifacts cannot be understood without reference to human intentions. This fact, I contend, has relevance to the use of artifacts in intentional action. I argue that because artifacts have intentions embedded into them antecedently, when we use artifacts we are sometimes compelled to intend descriptions of our actions that we might, for various reasons, be inclined to believe that we do not intend. I focus this argument to a specific set of artifacts, namely, medical (...)
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  6.  31
    The Alliance of Virtue and Vanity in Hume's Moral Theory.Philip Reed - 2012 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):595-614.
    In this article I argue that vanity, the desire for and delight in the favorable opinion of others, plays a fundamental role in Hume's account of moral motivation. Hume says that vanity and virtue are inseparable, though he does not explicitly say how or why this should be. I argue that Hume's account of sympathy can explain this alliance. In resting moral sentiment on sympathy, Hume gives a fundamental role to vanity as it becomes either a mediating motive to virtue (...)
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  7.  24
    Hume on the Cultivation of Moral Character.Philip Reed - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (1):299-315.
    This paper attempts to give a complete and coherent account of how Hume’s moral psychology can explain the cultivation of moral character. I argue that the outcome of a fully formed moral character is an agent who strengthens her calm moral sentiments into settled principles of action. I then take up the question of how the process of strengthening moral sentiments might occur, rejecting the possibilities of sympathy, “reflection,” and “resolution” because either they are too weak or else they make (...)
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  8.  20
    Motivating Hume's Natural Virtues.Philip A. Reed - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):134-147.
    Many commentators propose that Hume thinks that we are not or should not be motivated to perform naturally virtuous actions from moral sentiments if we want our actions to be genuinely virtuous. It is this proposal with which I take issue in this article, arguing that Hume fully incorporates the moral sentiments into his understanding of how human beings act when it comes to the natural virtues and that he does not see the moral sentiments as a problematic kind of (...)
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  9.  18
    Book Reviews Section 3.Phillip Reed Rulon, Virgil S. Lagomarcino, Melvyn I. Semmei, Gertrude Langsam, Franklin Parker, H. Herbert Benjamin, George A. Letchworth, Gene E. Hall, Earl H. Knebel, Paul Woodring, Ernest R. House, Beatrice E. Sarlos, Jeffrey W. Bulcock, Hans H. Jenny & Sean Desmond Healy - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (2):112-122.
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  10.  3
    Pleasing People.Philip A. Reed - 2016 - Philosophia Christi 18 (1):79-96.
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  11.  12
    Hume on Sympathy and Agreeable Qualities.Philip A. Reed - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (6):1136-1156.
    Hume says that sympathy is the source of our moral feeling of approval for useful qualities. But does Hume give the same psychological explanation of our approval of immediately agreeable qualities as he does to our approval of useful qualities? Does he trace our moral approbation of immediately agreeable qualities to sympathy? Some commentators, including Rachel Cohon and Don Garrett, argue that he does not. Let us call this view the ‘narrow view’ of sympathy in contrast to the ‘wide view’ (...)
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  12.  12
    How to Gerrymander Intention.Philip A. Reed - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):441-460.
    Essential to the doctrine of double effect is the idea that agents are prohibited from intending evil as a means to a good end. I argue in this paper that some recent accounts of intention from proponents of double effect cannot sustain this prohibition on harmful means. I outline two ways to gerrymander intention that mark these accounts. First, intention is construed in such a way that an agent intends only those states of affairs that she cares about or finds (...)
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  13. Hume’s Moral Philosophy and Contemporary Psychology.Philip Reed & Rico Vitz - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Recent work at the intersection of moral philosophy and the philosophy of psychology has dealt mostly with Aristotelian virtue ethics. The dearth of scholarship that engages with Hume’s moral philosophy, however, is both noticeable and peculiar. Hume's Moral Philosophy and Contemporary Psychology demonstrates how Hume’s moral philosophy comports with recent work from the empirical sciences and moral psychology. It shows how contemporary work in virtue ethics has much stronger similarities to the metaphysically thin conception of human nature that Hume developed, (...)
     
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  14. Opioids, Double Effect, and the Prospects of Hastening Death.Philip Reed - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    The relevance of double effect for end of life decision-making has been challenged recently by a number of scholars. The principal reason is that opioids such as morphine do not usually hasten death when administered to relieve pain at the end of life; therefore no secondary “double” effect is brought about. In my paper I argue against this view, showing how the doctrine of double effect is relevant to the administration of opioids at the end of life. I contend that (...)
     
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  15. 10 James Gibson's Ecological Approach to Cognition Edward S. Reed.Edward S. Reed - 1987 - In Alan Costall (ed.), Cognitive Psychology in Question. St Martin's Press. pp. 142.
     
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  16.  6
    Hume's Moral Psychology and Contemporary Psychology, Edited by Philip Reed and Rico Vitz. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  17.  9
    Book Reviews Section 2.Paul H. Mattingly, Paul C. Violas, Joseph N. Rathnau, Philip Reed Rulon, Robert Gallacher, Michael B. Campbell, Clara P. Mcmahon, Gerald L. Caplan, Arthur Brown, Nathaniel L. Champlin, Carlton H. Bowyer & William A. Proefriedt - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (3):155-163.
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  18.  34
    Young Frederic Harold. Charles Sanders Peirce: 1839–1914. Studies in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, Edited by Wiener Philip P. And Young Frederic H., Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1952, Pp. 271–276, 354–355. [REVIEW]Rulon Wells - 1959 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):211-211.
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  19.  5
    Review: George D. W. Berry, Philip P. Wiener, Frederic H. Young, Peirce's Contribution to the Logic of Statements and Quantifiers. [REVIEW]Rulon Wells - 1959 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):209-211.
  20.  23
    Labyrinthine Texts Penelope Reed Doob: The Idea of the Labyrinth: From Classical Antiquity Through the Middle Ages. Pp. Xviii + 355; 25 Plates. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1990. $34.95. [REVIEW]Philip Hardie - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (02):365-366.
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  21.  26
    A Random Blend: The Self in Philip Larkin’s Poems “Ambulances” and “The Building”.Neil Pickering - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):163-170.
    In two of his great poems, “Ambulances” and “The Building,” Philip Larkin considers a deep fear about human individuality. The fear is that the human self is contingent and disjunctive, lacking any integrity or unity. The arrival of an ambulance on an urban curb and a visit to the hospital are the occasion of reflection on this form of human fragility. But more significant, the ambulance and the hospital are imagined as contexts in which the contingency of the human (...)
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  22.  48
    Ronald Sandler and Philip Cafaro, Environmental Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW]Jason Kawall - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (4):429-32.
    A short review of "Environmental Virtue Ethics" (2005), a collection edited by Ronald Sandler and Philip Cafaro.
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  23.  29
    The Scientific Character of Philip Hefner's “Created Co‐Creator”.Victoria Lorrimar - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):726-746.
    Philip Hefner's understanding of humans as “created co-creators” has played a key role in the science and religion field, particularly as scholars consider the implications of emerging technologies for the human future. Hefner articulates his “created co-creator” framework in the form of scientifically testable hypotheses supporting his core understanding of human nature, adopting the structure of Imre Lakatos's scientific research programme. This article provides a brief exposition of Hefner's model, examines his hypotheses in order to assess their scientific character, (...)
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  24.  8
    Studies in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce: Second Series. [REVIEW]G. R. B. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):763-764.
    More than a decade after Philip P. Wiener and Frederick H. Young edited the first volume of Studies in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, Moore and Robin have brought together a collection of essays which serves as a valuable supplement to that earlier publication. It is more than a supplement, however; it can stand on its own as a significant contribution to Peirce scholarship. Continuity with the first volume is achieved through new essays which analyze Peirce's theory of (...)
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  25. Philip Merlan e la metafisica aristotelica.Walter Leszl - 1970 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 25 (1):3.
    The paper offers a discussion of Philip Merlan's contributions (in "From Platonism to Neoplatonism, The Hague 1960, e in some papers of his, now included in his "Kleine Philosophische Schriften", Hildesheim 1976) to the understanding of Aristotle's metaphysics, with particular reference to the science of being qua being.
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  26. Afhankelijkheid Zonder Dominantie Over de Sociale En Politieke Filosofie van Philip Pettit.Philip Pettit & Xavier Vanmechelen - 2002
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  27.  75
    Emergence Everywhere?! Reflections on Philip Clayton's Mind and Emergence.Antje Jackelen - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):623-632.
  28. Between Physicalism and Mentalism: Philip Clayton on Mind and Emergence.James W. Haag - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):633-647.
  29.  53
    Regarding Philip Clayton.Philip Rolnick - 2002 - Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):5-6.
    This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
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  30.  72
    God and Contemporary Science: Philip Clayton's Defense of Panentheism.Willem B. Drees - 1999 - Zygon 34 (3):515-525.
  31.  12
    Report of Psychological Tests at Reed College.Eleanor Rowland & Gladys Lowden - 1916 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 1 (3):211.
  32. Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn.Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.) - 2008 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Philip Quinn, John A. O’Brien Professor at the University of Notre Dame from 1985 until his death in 2004, was well known for his work in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, and core areas of analytic philosophy. Although the breadth of his interests was so great that it would be virtually impossible to identify any subset of them as representative, the contributors to this volume provide an excellent introduction to, and advance the discussion of, some of the questions (...)
     
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  33.  34
    Valores Epistêmicos No Naturalismo Normativo de Philip Kitcher.Eduardo Salles O. Barra - 2000 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 4 (1):1-26.
    This paper aims at analyzing Philip Kitcher's naturalistic epistemology, particularly its normative features, which are viewed as a sort of response to negative assessments made by radical naturalists on the plurality of epistemic values. According to them such values are ineffective for normative ends, e.g. theory choice. Differently from that quite excessive evaluation, Kitcher argues rather for explanatory unity as the most important and universal epistemic value. Even though Kitcher's arguments are sound, there remains some serious gaps as regards (...)
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  34.  51
    Legend Naturalism and Scientific Progress: An Essay on Philip Kitcher's.Miriam Solomon - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):205-218.
    Philip Kitcher's The Advancement of Science sets out, programmatically, a new naturalistic view of science as a process of building consensus practices. Detailed historical case studies—centrally, the Darwinian revolutio—are intended to support this view. I argue that Kitcher's expositions in fact support a more conservative view, that I dub ‘Legend Naturalism’. Using four historical examples which increasingly challenge Kitcher's discussions, I show that neither Legend Naturalism, nor the less conservative programmatic view, gives an adequate account of scientific progress. I (...)
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  35. Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry.Jaana Eigi - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's argument in light of (...)
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  36.  16
    Dynamic Stability and Basins of Attraction in the Sir Philip Sidney Game.Simon M. Huttegger & Kevin J. S. Zollman - unknown
    We study the handicap principle in terms of the Sir Philip Sidney game. The handicap principle asserts that cost is required to allow for honest signalling in the face of conflicts of interest. We show that the significance of the handicap principle can be challenged from two new directions. Firstly, both the costly signalling equilibrium and certain states of no communication are stable under the replicator dynamics ; however, the latter states are more likely in cases where honest signalling (...)
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  37. An Augmented Buck-Passing Account of Reasons and Value: Scanlon and Crisp on What Stops the Buck: Philip Cook.Philip Cook - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (4):490-507.
    Roger Crisp has inspired two important criticisms of Scanlon's buck-passing account of value. I defend buck-passing from the wrong kind of reasons criticism, and the reasons and the good objection. I support Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen's dual role of reasons in refuting the wrong kind of reasons criticism, even where its authors claim it fails. Crisp's reasons and the good objection contends that the property of goodness is buck-passing in virtue of its formality. I argue that Crisp conflates general and formal (...)
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  38. Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher’s Science, Truth, and Democracy.Helen E. Longino - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not moved far enough from (...)
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  39.  14
    Reuben Hersh. Proving is Convincing and Explaining. Educational Studies in Mathematics, Vol. 24 , Pp. 389–399. - Philip J. Davis. Visual Theorems. Educational Studies in Mathematics, Vol. 24 , Pp. 333–344. - Gila Hanna and H. Niels Jahnke. Proof and Application. Educational Studies in Mathematics, Vol. 24 , Pp. 421–438. - Daniel Chazan. High School Geometry Students' Justification for Their Views of Empirical Evidence and Mathematical Proof. Educational Studies in Mathematics Vol. 24 ,Pp. 359–387. [REVIEW]Don Fallis - 1998 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (3):1196-1200.
    Reviewed Works:Reuben Hersh, Proving is Convincing and Explaining.Philip J. Davis, Visual Theorems.Gila Hanna, H. Niels Jahnke, Proof and Application.Daniel Chazan, High School Geometry Students' Justification for Their Views of Empirical Evidence and Mathematical Proof.
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  40.  78
    The Fearless Vampire Conservator: Philip Kitcher, Genetic Determinism and the Informational Gene.Paul E. Griffiths - 2006 - In Christoph Rehmann-Sutter & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.), Genes in Development: Rethinking the Molecular Paradigm. Duke University Press. pp. 175--198.
    Genetic determinism is the idea that many significant human characteristics are rendered inevitable by the presence of certain genes. The psychologist Susan Oyama has famously compared arguing against genetic determinism to battling the undead. Oyama suggests that genetic determinism is inherent in the way we currently represent genes and what genes do. As long as genes are represented as containing information about how the organism will develop, they will continue to be regarded as determining causes no matter how much evidence (...)
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  41.  22
    I—Philip Percival.Philip Percival - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):121-151.
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  42. Philip Kitcher.Philip Kitcher - unknown
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
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  43.  6
    Hegel and Right. A Study of the Philosophy of Right by Philip J. Kain. [REVIEW]Mark Tunick - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2):355-356.
    There are many studies of Hegel's Philosophy of Right. Philip Kain does not break new ground in Hegel and Right. Nor does he deal with the German scholarship that did, by posing the possibility of an esoteric Hegel belying the exoteric author caving to censorship pressure. Still, he has provided us a worthwhile book that touches on some controversial issues. Kain professes to be a Marxian and social democrat who opposes capital punishment and supports same-sex marriage and, perhaps not (...)
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  44.  44
    Philip Kitcher, Science in a Democratic Society.Mark B. Brown - 2013 - Minerva 51 (3):389-397.
    Philip Kitcher is a leading figure in the philosophy of science, and he is part of a growing community of scholars who have turned their attention from the field’s long-time focus on questions of logic and epistemology to the relation between science and society. Kitcher’s book Science, Truth, and Democracy (2001) charted a course between relativism and realism, arguing that the aims of science emerge from not only scientific curiosity but also practical and public concerns. The book also drew (...)
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  45.  77
    Introduction: A Collaborative Critical Conversation on Philip Kitcher's Preludes to Pragmatism. Green - 2014 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):1.
    On April 26, 2013, Philip Kitcher met with a line-up of six critics at the New York Pragmatist Forum to learn what they thought about his latest large book, Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction in Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2012). The following contributions, as well as Kitcher’s reply, originated in this meeting, with each author taking into account Kitcher’s initial responses while further developing his or her arguments.As S. Joshua Thomas notes below, our purpose as critics has been (...)
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  46. From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum.Bence Nanay - 2013 - Theoria (77):257-264.
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the philosophy (...)
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  47. Epistemic Circularity and Common Sense: A Reply to Reed.Michael Bergmann - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):198-207.
    When one depends on a belief source in sustaining a belief that that very belief source is trustworthy, then that belief is an epistemically circular belief. A number of philosophers have objected to externalism in epistemology on the grounds that it commits one to thinking EC-beliefs can be justified, something they view as an unhappy consequence for externalism. In my 2004, I defend externalism against this sort of charge by explaining why this consequence needn’t be an unhappy one. In the (...)
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  48.  36
    Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory: Philip Mirowski.Philip Mirowski - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):67-95.
    Is rhetoric just a new and trendy way to épater les bourgeois? Unfortunately, I think that the newfound interest of some economists in rhetoric, and particularly Donald McCloskey in his new book and subsequent responses to critics, gives that impression. After economists have worked so hard for the past five decades to learn their sums, differential calculus, real analysis, and topology, it is a fair bet that one could easily hector them about their woeful ignorance of the conjugation of Latin (...)
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  49.  5
    The Strategy of Philip in 346 B.C.M. Markle - 1974 - Classical Quarterly 24 (2):253-268.
    The relatively plentiful sources for the year 346 pose several questions which have never been satisfactorily answered. Why did Philip insist on an alliance with Athens as a precondition of the peace? Did Demosthenes simply invent the promises of Philip which he claims Aeschines reported to the Athenian assembly in Skirophorion? Why were the Athenians frightened when Philip got control of Thermopylae? They had long expected him to settle the Sacred War, and such action surely required occupation (...)
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  50.  53
    Jamesian Reasonable Belief and Deweyan Religious Communities: Reconstructing Philosophy Pragmatically with Philip Kitcher. Green - 2014 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):69.
    Philip Kitcher brings his own inclusive and liberatory purposes to bear in Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction of Philosophy, including in several chapters in which he criticizes William James’s defense of religious belief in “The Will to Believe” and Varieties of Religious Experience, while affirming John Dewey’s emphasis on a “religious” orientation toward community and nature in A Common Faith. These chapters in Kitcher’swide-ranging and beautifully written book contain many insights and imaginative proposals for advancing a “post-religion”secular humanism (...)
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