21 found
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  1.  59
    The Development of Features in Object Concepts.Philippe G. Schyns, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean-Pierre Thibaut - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):1-17.
    According to one productive and influential approach to cognition, categorization, object recognition, and higher level cognitive processes operate on a set of fixed features, which are the output of lower level perceptual processes. In many situations, however, it is the higher level cognitive process being executed that influences the lower level features that are created. Rather than viewing the repertoire of features as being fixed by low-level processes, we present a theory in which people create features to subserve the representation (...)
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  2.  19
    Four Not Six: Revealing Culturally Common Facial Expressions of Emotion.Rachael E. Jack, Wei Sun, Ioannis Delis, Oliver G. B. Garrod & Philippe G. Schyns - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (6):708-730.
  3.  35
    Dr. Angry and Mr. Smile: When Categorization Flexibly Modifies the Perception of Faces in Rapid Visual Presentations.Philippe G. Schyns & Aude Oliva - 1999 - Cognition 69 (3):243-265.
  4.  22
    Diagnostic Recognition: Task Constraints, Object Information, and Their Interactions.Philippe G. Schyns - 1998 - Cognition 67 (1-2):147-179.
  5.  13
    Internal Representations Reveal Cultural Diversity in Expectations of Facial Expressions of Emotion.Rachael E. Jack, Roberto Caldara & Philippe G. Schyns - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (1):19-25.
  6. Channel Surfing in the Visual Brain.Paul T. Sowden & Philippe G. Schyns - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (12):538-545.
  7.  16
    A Modular Neural Network Model of Concept Acquisition.Philippe G. Schyns - 1991 - Cognitive Science 15 (4):461-508.
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  8.  10
    Information and Viewpoint Dependence in Face Recognition.Harold Hill, Philippe G. Schyns & Shigeru Akamatsu - 1997 - Cognition 62 (2):201-222.
  9.  38
    Categories and Percepts: A Bi-Directionnal Framework for Categorization.Philippe G. Schyns - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):183-189.
  10.  6
    Spatio‐Temporal Dynamics of Face Recognition in a Flash: It's in the Eyes.Céline Vinette, Frédéric Gosselin & Philippe G. Schyns - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (2):289-301.
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  11.  44
    RAP: A New Framework for Visual Categorization.Frédéric Gosselin & Philippe G. Schyns - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (2):70-77.
  12. Information Processing Algorithms in the Brain.Philippe G. Schyns, Frédéric Gosselin & Marie L. Smith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):20-26.
  13.  6
    Why Do We SLIP to the Basic Level? Computational Constraints and Their Implementation.Frédéric Gosselin & Philippe G. Schyns - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):735-758.
  14.  9
    ERP Evidence for Task Modulations on Face Perceptual Processing at Different Spatial Scales.Valérie Goffaux, Boutheina Jemel, Corentin Jacques, Bruno Rossion & Philippe G. Schyns - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (2):313-325.
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  15.  15
    What Goes Up May Come Down: Perceptual Process and Knowledge Access in the Organization of Complex Visual Patterns by Young Infants.Paul C. Quinn & Philippe G. Schyns - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (6):923-935.
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  16.  28
    You Are About to See Pictorial Representations!Frédéric Gosselin & Philippe G. Schyns - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):191-192.
    Pylyshyn argues against representations with pictorial properties that would be superimposed on a scene. We present evidence against this view, and a new method to depict pictorial properties. We propose a continuum between the top-down generation of internal signals (imagery) and the bottom-up signals from the outside world. Along the continuum, superstitious perceptions provide a method to tackle representational issues.
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  17.  20
    A Picture is Worth Thousands of Trials: Rendering the Use of Visual Information From Spiking Neurons to Recognition.Frédéric Gosselin & Philippe G. Schyns - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (2):141-146.
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  18.  12
    Ways of Featuring in Object Categorization.Philippe G. Schyns, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean-Pierre Thibaut - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):41-54.
    The origin of features from nonfeatural information is a problem that should concern all theories of object categorization and recognition, not just the flexible feature approach. In contrast to the idea that new features must originate from combinations of simpler fixed features, we argue that holistic features can be created from a direct imprinting on the visual medium. Furthermore, featural descriptions can emerge from processes that by themselves do not operate on feature detectors. Once acquired, features can be decomposed into (...)
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  19.  9
    Special Issue Rendering the Use of Visual Information From Spiking Neurons to Recognition a Picture is Worth Thousands of Trials: Rendering the Use of Visual Information From Spiking Neurons to Recognition 141.Frédéric Gosselin, Philippe G. Schyns, Dario Ringach, Robert Shapley, Jason M. Gold, Allison B. Sekuler, Partrick J. Bennett, Michael C. Mangini, Irving Biederman & Cheryl Olman - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28:1035-1039.
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  20. A Neural Network Model of Conceptual Development.Philippe G. Schyns - 1991 - Cognitive Science 15 (4):461-508.
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  21.  63
    The Case for Cognitive Penetrability.Philippe G. Schyns - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):394-395.
    Pylyshyn acknowledges that cognition intervenes in determining the nature of perception when attention is allocated to locations or properties prior to the operation of early vision. I present evidence that scale perception (one function of early vision) is cognitively penetrable and argue that Pylyshyn's criterion covers not a few, but many situations of recognition. Cognitive penetrability could be their modus operandi.
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