Results for 'Phillip Pahin'

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  1.  67
    A Human-Animal Relational Aesthetic: Towards a Zoophilic Representation of Animals in Art. [REVIEW]Phillip Pahin & Alyx Macfadyen - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (2):231-243.
    The systematic examination of the visual depiction of nonhuman animals by humans, and the representation of nonhuman animal imagery is an opportunity to observe varying degrees of anthropocentrism in the manner in which the nonhuman animal is represented. The investigation we present ventures beyond the traditional scope of post-modern human alterity and suggests that an Otherness status should be extended to encompass both the human animal and the nonhuman animal. An important motivation for seriously considering nonhuman animal experience is the (...)
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  2. Absent causes, present effects: How omissions cause events.Phillip Wolff, Matthew Hausknecht & Kevin Holmes - 2011 - In Jürgen Bohnemeyer & Eric Pederson (eds.), Event representation in language and cognition. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  3.  7
    Religious Experience: Implications for What Is Real.Phillip H. Wiebe - 2023 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Phillip Wiebe examines religious, spiritual, and mystical experiences, assessing how these experiences appear to implicate a spiritual order. Despite the current prevalence of naturalism and atheism, he argues that experiences purporting to have a religious or spiritual significance deserve close empirical investigation. Wiebe surveys the broad scope of religious experience and considers different types of evidence that might give rise to a belief in phenomena such as spirits, paranormal events, God, and an afterlife. He demonstrates that (...)
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  4. Defining ‘business ethics’: Like nailing jello to a wall.Phillip V. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):377-383.
    Business ethics is a topic receiving much attention in the literature. However, the term 'business ethics' is not adequately defined. Typical definitions refer to the rightness or wrongness of behavior, but not everyone agrees on what is morally right or wrong, good or bad, ethical or unethical. To complicate the problem, nearly all available definitions exist at highly abstract levels. This article focuses on contemporary definitions of business ethics by business writers and professionals and on possible areas of agreement among (...)
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  5.  54
    The Darwinian Revolution: Science Red in Tooth and Claw. Michael Ruse.Phillip R. Sloan - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (4):623-627.
  6. Philosophies of Exclusion: Liberal Political Theory and Immigration.Phillip Cole - 2000 - Edinburgh University Press.
    The mass movement of people across the globe constitutes a major feature of world politics today. -/- Whatever the cause of the movement - often war, famine, economic hardship, political repression or climate change - the governments of western capitalist states see this 'torrent of people in flight' as a serious threat to their stability and the scale of this migration indicates a need for a radical re-thinking of both political theory and practice, for the sake of political, social and (...)
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  7.  66
    Evolutionary theory and the ultimate-proximate distinction in the human behavioral sciences.T. C. Scott-Phillips, T. E. Dickins & S. A. West - unknown
    To properly understand behavior, we must obtain both ultimate and proximate explanations. Put briefly, ultimate explanations are concerned with why a behavior exists, and proximate explanations are concerned with how it works. These two types of explanation are complementary and the distinction is critical to evolutionary explanation. We are concerned that they have become conflated in some areas of the evolutionary literature on human behavior. This article brings attention to these issues. We focus on three specific areas: the evolution of (...)
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  8. Composition as a Kind of Identity.Phillip Bricker - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):264-294.
    Composition as identity, as I understand it, is a theory of the composite structure of reality. The theory’s underlying logic is irreducibly plural; its fundamental primitive is a generalized identity relation that takes either plural or singular arguments. Strong versions of the theory that incorporate a generalized version of the indiscernibility of identicals are incompatible with the framework of plural logic, and should be rejected. Weak versions of the theory that are based on the idea that composition is merely analogous (...)
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  9.  73
    The niche construction perspective: a critical appraisal.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Kevin N. Laland, David M. Shuker, Thomas E. Dickins & Stuart A. West - unknown
    Niche construction refers to the activities of organisms that bring about changes in their environments, many of which are evolutionarily and ecologically consequential. Advocates of niche construction theory (NCT) believe that standard evolutionary theory fails to recognize the full importance of niche construction, and consequently propose a novel view of evolution, in which niche construction and its legacy over time (ecological inheritance) are described as evolutionary processes, equivalent in importance to natural selection. Here, we subject NCT to critical evaluation, in (...)
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  10.  10
    A History of Greek Philosophy.Phillip De Lacy & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1964 - American Journal of Philology 85 (4):435.
  11. Developing human-nonhuman chimeras in human stem cell research: Ethical issues and boundaries.Phillip Karpowicz, Cynthia B. Cohen & Derek J. Van der Kooy - 2005 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (2):107-134.
    : The transplantation of adult human neural stem cells into prenatal non-humans offers an avenue for studying human neural cell development without direct use of human embryos. However, such experiments raise significant ethical concerns about mixing human and nonhuman materials in ways that could result in the development of human-nonhuman chimeras. This paper examines four arguments against such research, the moral taboo, species integrity, "unnaturalness," and human dignity arguments, and finds the last plausible. It argues that the transfer of human (...)
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  12.  8
    Telling about problems and giving advice in an Internet discussion forum: some discourse features.Phillip R. Morrow - 2006 - Discourse Studies 8 (4):531-548.
    This study describes discourse features of messages posted to an Internet discussion forum about depression based on the analysis of a small corpus of message texts. The message texts were classified into three types: problem messages, advice messages and thanks messages, and salient discourse features of each message type were described and analyzed in terms of discourse function. Features of problem messages included: frequent use of metaphorical language to describe symptoms, use of or type questions to request advice, and a (...)
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  13. Island Universes and the Analysis of Modality.Phillip Bricker - 2001 - In Gerhard Preyer & Frank Siebelt (eds.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    It follows from Humean principles of plenitude, I argue, that island universes are possible: physical reality might have 'absolutely isolated' parts. This makes trouble for Lewis's modal realism; but the realist has a way out. First, accept absolute actuality, which is defensible, I argue, on independent grounds. Second, revise the standard analysis of modality: modal operators are 'plural', not 'individual', quantifiers over possible worlds. This solves the problem of island universes and confers three additional benefits: an 'unqualified' principle of compossibility (...)
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  14.  91
    Modal Matters: Essays in Metaphysics.Phillip Bricker (ed.) - 2020 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume contains eighteen papers, three with new postscripts, that were written over the past 35 years. Five of the papers have not been previously published. Together they provide a comprehensive account of modal reality—the realm of possible worlds—from a Humean perspective, with excursions into neighboring topics in metaphysics. Part 1 sketches an account of reality as a whole, both the mathematical and the modal, defending a form of plenitudinous realism: every consistent proposition is true of some portion of reality. (...)
  15.  33
    Cognitive and noncognitive determinants and consequences of complex skill acquisition.Phillip L. Ackerman, Ruth Kanfer & Maynard Goff - 1995 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 1 (4):270.
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  16. Concrete possible worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell. pp. 111--134.
    In this chapter, I survey what I call Lewisian approaches to modality: approaches that analyze modality in terms of concrete possible worlds and their parts. I take the following four theses to be characteristic of Lewisian approaches to modality. (1) There is no primitive modality. (2) There exists a plurality of concrete possible worlds. (3) Actuality is an indexical concept. (4) Modality de re is to be analyzed in terms of counterparts, not transworld identity. After an introductory section in which (...)
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  17.  53
    Signalling signalhood and the emergence of communication.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Simon Kirby & Graham R. S. Ritchie - 2009 - Cognition 113 (2):226-233.
  18. Absolute Actuality and the Plurality of Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):41–76.
    According to David Lewis, a realist about possible worlds must hold that actuality is relative: the worlds are ontologically all on a par; the actual and the merely possible differ, not absolutely, but in how they relate to us. Call this 'Lewisian realism'. The alternative, 'Leibnizian realism', holds that actuality is an absolute property that marks a distinction in ontological status. Lewis presents two arguments against Leibnizian realism. First, he argues that the Leibnizian realist cannot account for the contingency of (...)
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  19. Plato and Pythagoreanism.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Was Plato a Pythagorean? Plato's students and earliest critics thought so, but scholars since the nineteenth century have been more skeptical. With this probing study, Phillip Sidney Horky argues that a specific type of Pythagorean philosophy, called "mathematical" Pythagoreanism, exercised a decisive influence on fundamental aspects of Plato's philosophy. The progenitor of mathematical Pythagoreanism was the infamous Pythagorean heretic and political revolutionary Hippasus of Metapontum, a student of Pythagoras who is credited with experiments in harmonics that led to innovations (...)
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  20.  67
    A Modified Conception of Mechanisms.Phillip J. Torres - 2009 - Erkenntnis 71 (2):233-251.
    In this paper, I critique two conceptions of mechanisms, namely those put forth by Stuart Glennan (Erkenntnis 44:49–71, 1996; Philosophy of Science 69:S342–S353, 2002) and Machamer et al. (Philosophy of Science 67:1–25, 2000). Glennan’s conception, I argue, cannot account for mechanisms involving negative causation because of its interactionist posture. MDC’s view encounters the same problem due to its reificatory conception of activities—this conception, I argue, entails an onerous commitment to ontological dualism. In the place of Glennan and MDC, I propose (...)
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  21.  2
    History of physics.Spencer R. Weart & Melba Phillips (eds.) - 1985 - New York, N.Y.: American Institute of Physics.
    Blurb & Contents Readings from Physics Today With over 300 photographs and illustrations, this volume is a valuable library reference, a useful supplementary text for a wide range of courses, and stimulating leisure reading for physicists and non- physicists alike.
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  22. Heritage and Hermeneutics: Towards a Broader Interpretation of Interpretation.Phillip Ablett & Pamela Dyer - 2009 - Current Issues in Tourism 12 (3):209-233.
    This article re-examines the theoretical basis for environmental and heritage interpretation in tourist settings in the light of hermeneutic philosophy. It notes that the pioneering vision of heritage interpretation formulated by Freeman Tilden envisaged a broadly educational, ethically informed and transformative art. By contrast, current cognitive psychological attempts to reduce interpretation to the monological transmission of information, targeting universal but individuated cognitive structures, are found to be wanting. Despite growing signs of diversity, this information processing approach to interpretation remains dominant. (...)
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  23.  68
    Augustine's Invention of the Inner Self: The Legacy of a Christian Platonist.Phillip Cary - 2000 - Oup Usa.
    Phillip Cary argues that Augustine invented or created the concept of self as an inner space--as space into which one can enter and in which one can find God. This concept of inwardness, says Cary, has worked its way deeply into the intellectual heritage of the West and many Western individuals have experienced themselves as inner selves. After surveying the idea of inwardness in Augustine's predecessors, Cary offers a re-examination of Augustine's own writings, making the controversial point that in (...)
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  24. Realism without parochialism.Phillip Bricker - 2020 - In Modal Matters: Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 40-76.
    I am a realist of a metaphysical stripe. I believe in an immense realm of "modal" and "abstract" entities, of entities that are neither part of, nor stand in any causal relation to, the actual, concrete world. For starters: I believe in possible worlds and individuals; in propositions, properties, and relations (both abundantly and sparsely conceived); in mathematical objects and structures; and in sets (or classes) of whatever I believe in. Call these sorts of entity, and the reality they comprise, (...)
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  25. Writing in the Place of the Animal.Phillip Warnell - 2016 - In Carrie Giunta & Adrienne Janus (eds.), Nancy and Visual Culture. Edinburgh University Press.
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  26. Social Work as Revolutionary Praxis? The contribution to critical practice of Cornelius Castoriadis’s political philosophy.Phillip Ablett & Christine Morley - 2019 - Critical and Radical Social Work 7 (3): 333-348.
    Social work is a contested tradition, torn between the demands of social governance and autonomy. Today, this struggle is reflected in the division between the dominant, neoliberal agenda of service provision and the resistance offered by various critical perspectives employed by disparate groups of practitioners serving diverse communities. Critical social work challenges oppressive conditions and discourses, in addition to addressing their consequences in individuals’ lives. However, very few recent critical theorists informing critical social work have advocated revolution. A challenging exception (...)
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  27. Prudence.Phillip Bricker - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 77 (7):381-401.
    The article explicates a notion of prudence according to which an agent acts prudently if he acts so as to satisfy not only his present preferences, but his past and future preferences as well. A simplified decision-theoretic framework is developed within which three analyses of prudence are presented and compared. That analysis is defended which can best handle cases in which an agent's present act will affect his future preferences.
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  28. Poulantzas' Strategic Analysis of Fascism.Phillip Ablett & George Evangelista - 1987 - Diliman Review 35 (5-6):104-112.
    The term 'fascism' continues to be very much in currency in Philippines society. To the Filipino people, its meaning is often drawn from pained memory of wholesale deprivation of democratic rights and large-scale human rights abuses. Yet, to many, the fear of fascism has still to give way to a deeper understanding of this menace. This may hold true even among those belonging to the progressive movement. One Marxist philosopher and theoretician who gave extended treatment of the issues surrounding the (...)
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  29. Bad Faith and Sartre's Waiter.D. Z. Phillips - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (215):23 - 31.
    What is one to make of Sartre's treatment of his waiter in one of his famous analyses of bad faith? The example is supposed to be an obvious one, but the more we examine it, the less obvious it becomes. Let us remind ourselves of Sartre's example: Let us consider this waiter in the café. His movement is quick and forward, a little too precise, a little too rapid. He comes toward the patrons with a step a little too quick. (...)
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  30.  16
    My Neighbour and My Neighbours.D. Z. Phillips - 1989 - Philosophical Investigations 12 (2):112-133.
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  31. Isolation and Unification: The Realist Analysis of Possible Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):225 - 238.
    If realism about possible worlds is to succeed in eliminating primitive modality, it must provide an 'analysis' of possible world: nonmodal criteria for demarcating one world from another. This David Lewis has done. Lewis holds, roughly, that worlds are maximal unified regions of logical space. So far, so good. But what Lewis means by 'unification' is too narrow, I think, in two different ways. First, for Lewis, all worlds are (almost) 'globally' unified: at any world, (almost) every part is directly (...)
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  32.  21
    (Toward) a Phenomenology of Acting.Phillip Zarrilli & Evan Thompson - 2019 - Routledge.
    In a phenomenology of acting, Phillip Zarrilliconsiders acting as a 'question' to be explored in the studio, and then reflected upon. This book is a vital response to Jerzy Grotowski's essential question: "How does the actor 'touch that which is untouchable?'" Phenomenology invites us to listen to "the things themselves", to be attentive to how we sensorially, kinaesthetically, and affectively engage with acting as a phenomenon and process. Using detailed first-person accounts of acting across a variety of dramaturgies and (...)
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  33. Defining 'business ethics': Like nailing jello to a wall. [REVIEW]Phillip V. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):377 - 383.
    Business ethics is a topic receiving much attention in the literature. However, the term 'business ethics' is not adequately defined. Typical definitions refer to the rightness or wrongness of behavior, but not everyone agrees on what is morally right or wrong, good or bad, ethical or unethical. To complicate the problem, nearly all available definitions exist at highly abstract levels. This article focuses on contemporary definitions of business ethics by business writers and professionals and on possible areas of agreement among (...)
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  34. Should Student-Athletes be Paid?Phillip Zema - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (2):198-212.
    :The National Collegiate Athletic Association currently prohibits student-athletes from receiving compensation from many non-school-affiliated sources, including sports agents, adver...
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  35.  8
    Polarity and Analogy.Phillip De Lacy & G. E. R. Lloyd - 1967 - American Journal of Philology 88 (4):485.
  36.  20
    The Irony of Ironic Liberalism.Phillips E. Young - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):121-130.
  37. Plenitude of Possible Structures.Phillip Bricker - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):607-619.
    Which mathematical structures are possible, that is, instantiated by the concrete inhabitants of some possible world? Are there worlds with four-dimensional space? With infinite-dimensional space? Whence comes our knowledge of the possibility of structures? In this paper, I develop and defend a principle of plenitude according to which any mathematically natural generalization of possible structure is itself possible. I motivate the principle pragmatically by way of the role that logical possibility plays in our inquiry into the world.
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  38.  89
    Is There a Humean Account of Quantities?Phillip Bricker - 2017 - Philosophical Issues 27 (1):26-51.
    Humeans have a problem with quantities. A core principle of any Humean account of modality is that fundamental entities can freely recombine. But determinate quantities, if fundamental, seem to violate this core principle: determinate quantities belonging to the same determinable necessarily exclude one another. Call this the problem of exclusion. Prominent Humeans have responded in various ways. Wittgenstein, when he resurfaced to philosophy, gave the problem of exclusion as a reason to abandon the logical atomism of the Tractatus with its (...)
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  39.  4
    Reason and Conduct: New Bearings in Moral Philosophy.D. Z. Phillips - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):189-190.
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  40.  39
    Mass Terms and Model-Theoretic Semantics.Phillip Bricker & Harry C. Bunt - 1988 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (2):653.
  41.  86
    In Defense of Medial Theories of Sound.Phillip John Meadows - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):293-302.
    In the recent literature on the nature of sound, there is an emerging consensus rejection of what might be thought of as the scientifically informed commonsense position: that sounds, whatever else they may be, must be entities that mediate between the source of the sound and the subject hearing it. This paper offers an argument for such "medial" theories of sound. This argument is intended to shift attention from the two considerations that have dominated the debate thus far: the relevant (...)
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  42. The myth of evil: demonizing the enemy.Phillip Cole - 2006 - Westport, Conn.: Praeger.
    Terrorism, torture, and the problems of evil -- Diabolical evil, searching for Satan -- Philosophies of evil -- Communities of fear -- The enemy within -- Bad seeds -- The character of evil -- Facing the Holocaust -- Twenty-first-century mythologies.
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  43.  17
    Dance and the Problem of Postmodern Politics.Phillips Edward Young - 1998 - International Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):131-143.
  44.  18
    Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age by Donna Zuckerberg.Phillip Zapkin - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (3):239-240.
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  45.  11
    The Story of Myth by Sarah Iles Johnston.Phillip Zapkin - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (1):114-116.
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  46.  66
    Experiencing Silence.Phillip John Meadows - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):238-250.
    This paper identifies three claims that feature prominently in recent discussions concerning the experience of silence: that experiences of silence are the most “negative” of perceptions, that we do not hear silences because those silences cause our experiences of silence, and that to hear silence is to hear a temporal region devoid of sound. The principal proponents of this approach are Phillips and Soteriou, and here I present a series of objections to common elements of their attempts to place these (...)
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  47. Arguing From Neuroscience in Psychiatry.James Phillips - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):61-63.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 9.1 (2002) 61-63 [Access article in PDF] Arguing from Neuroscience in Psychiatry James Phillips PHILIP GERRANS "A One-stage Explanation of the Cotard Delusion" provides an elegant example of the application of neuroscientific findings to known clinical phenomena in psychiatry. Gerrans argues that, in the cases of the Cotard and Capgras delusions, a one-stage explanation is sufficient to account for the clinical phenomena. That is, the (...)
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  48.  44
    Critical social work education as democratic paideía: Inspiration from Cornelius Castoriadis to educate for democracy and autonomy.Phillip Ablett & Christine Morley - 2020 - In Christine Morley, Phillip Ablett, Carolyn Noble & Stephen Cowden (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Critical Pedagogies for Social Work. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 176-188.
    The question of education for democratic ‘empowerment and liberation’, and how this might guide pedagogic practice is seldom raised and extremely challenging for social work education today. This chapter takes up the proposition that social work, through its educational practices, ‘can’ deliver on its promise of ‘democratic practice’ if democracy is understood as a process and not a predefined product. We argue that such a process and its embodiment in institutions cannot exist without the formation of radically democratic subjects, people (...)
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  49. The Relation Between General and Particular: Entailment vs. Supervenience.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, vol. 2. Oxford University Press. pp. 251-287.
    Some argue, following Bertrand Russell, that because general truths are not entailed by particular truths, general facts must be posited to exist in addition to particular facts. I argue on the contrary that because general truths (globally) supervene on particular truths, general facts are not needed in addition to particular facts; indeed, if one accepts the Humean denial of necessary connections between distinct existents, one can further conclude that there are no general facts. When entailment and supervenience do not coincide (...)
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  50.  17
    Communications.Phillip Abbott - 1982 - Political Theory 10 (4):606-609.
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