Results for 'Philosophy for Children'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  96
    The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child.Karin Murris - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  2.  98
    Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice.Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  70
    Philosophy for Children as the Wind of Thinking.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):19–35.
    In this paper I want to analyse the meaning of education for democracy and thinking as this is generally understood by Philosophy for Children. Although we may be inclined to applaud Philosophy for Children's emphasis on children, critical thinking, autonomy and dialogue, there is reason for scepticism too. Since we are expected as a matter of course to subscribe to the basic assumptions of Philosophy for Children, we seem to become tied, as it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  4. Philosophy for Children in Australia: Then, Now, and Where to From Here?Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Re-Engaging with Politics: Re-Imagining the University, 45th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, ACU, Melbourne, 5-8 Dec 2015.
    In the late 1960s Matthew Lipman and his colleagues at IAPC developed an educational philosophy he called Philosophy for Children. At the heart of Philosophy for Children is the community of Inquiry, with its emphasis on classroom dialogue, in the form of collaborative philosophical inquiry. In this paper we explore the development of educational practice that has grown out of Philosophy for Children in the context of Australia. -/- Australia adapted Lipman’s ideas on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  85
    Philosophy for Children and its Critics: A Mendham Dialogue.Maughn Gregory - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):199-219.
    As conceived by founders Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, Philosophy for Children is a humanistic practice with roots in the Hellenistic tradition of philosophy as a way of life given to the search for meaning, in American pragmatism with its emphasis on qualitative experience, collaborative inquiry and democratic society, and in American and Soviet social learning theory. The programme has attracted overlapping and conflicting criticism from religious and social conservatives who don't want children to question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6. Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  32
    Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?Stephen Gorard, Nadia Siddiqui & Beng Huat See - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):5-22.
    There are tensions within formal education between imparting knowledge and the development of skills for handling that knowledge. In the primary school sector, the latter can also be squeezed out of the curriculum by a focus on basic skills such as literacy and numeracy. What happens when an explicit attempt is made to develop young children's reasoning—both in terms of their apparent cognitive abilities and their basic skills? This paper reports an independent evaluation of an in-class intervention called ‘ (...) for Children’, after just over one year of schooling. The intervention aims to help children become more willing and able to question, reason, construct arguments and collaborate with others. A group of 48 volunteer schools were randomised to receive P4C or act as a control for one year. This paper reports the CAT results for all pupils in years 4 and 5 initially, and the Key Stage 2 attainment in English and Maths for those starting in year 5. There was no school dropout. Individual attrition from a total of 3,159 pupils was around 11 percent—roughly equal between groups. There were small positive ‘effect’ sizes in favour of the P4C group in progress in reading and maths, and even smaller perhaps negligible improvements in CAT scores and writing. The results for the most disadvantaged pupils were larger for attainment, but not for CATs. Observations and interviews suggest that the intervention was generally enjoyable and thought to be beneficial for pupil confidence. Our conclusion is that, for those wishing to improve attainment outcomes in the short term, an emphasis on developing reasoning is promising, especially for the poorest students, but perhaps not the most effective way forward. However, for those who value reasoning for its own sake, this evaluation demonstrates that using curriculum time in this way does not damage attainment, and so suggests that something like P4C is an appropriate educational approach. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  11
    Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?Stephen Gorard, Nadia Siddiqui & Beng Huat See - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).
    There are tensions within formal education between imparting knowledge and the development of skills for handling that knowledge. In the primary school sector, the latter can also be squeezed out of the curriculum by a focus on basic skills such as literacy and numeracy. What happens when an explicit attempt is made to develop young children's reasoning—both in terms of their apparent cognitive abilities and their basic skills? This paper reports an independent evaluation of an in-class intervention called ‘ (...) for Children’, after just over one year of schooling. The intervention aims to help children become more willing and able to question, reason, construct arguments and collaborate with others. A group of 48 volunteer schools were randomised to receive P4C or act as a control for one year. This paper reports the CAT results for all pupils in years 4 and 5 initially, and the Key Stage 2 attainment in English and Maths for those starting in year 5. There was no school dropout. Individual attrition from a total of 3,159 pupils was around 11 percent—roughly equal between groups. There were small positive ‘effect’ sizes in favour of the P4C group in progress in reading and maths, and even smaller perhaps negligible improvements in CAT scores and writing. The results for the most disadvantaged pupils were larger for attainment, but not for CATs. Observations and interviews suggest that the intervention was generally enjoyable and thought to be beneficial for pupil confidence. Our conclusion is that, for those wishing to improve attainment outcomes in the short term, an emphasis on developing reasoning is promising, especially for the poorest students, but perhaps not the most effective way forward. However, for those who value reasoning for its own sake, this evaluation demonstrates that using curriculum time in this way does not damage attainment, and so suggests that something like P4C is an appropriate educational approach. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  69
    Philosophy for Children, Values Education and the Inquiring Society.Philip Cam - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-9.
    How can school education best bring about moral improvement? Socrates believed that the unexamined life was not worth living and that the philosophical examination of life required a collaborative inquiry. Today, our society relegates responsibility for values to the personal sphere rather than the social one. I will argue that, overall, we need to give more emphasis to collaboration and inquiry rather than pitting students against each other and focusing too much attention on ‘teaching that’ instead of ‘teaching how’. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  15
    Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?Gorard Stephen, Siddiqui Nadia & S. E. E. Beng Huat - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):5-22.
    There are tensions within formal education between imparting knowledge and the development of skills for handling that knowledge. In the primary school sector, the latter can also be squeezed out of the curriculum by a focus on basic skills such as literacy and numeracy. What happens when an explicit attempt is made to develop young children's reasoning—both in terms of their apparent cognitive abilities and their basic skills? This paper reports an independent evaluation of an in-class intervention called ‘ (...) for Children’, after just over one year of schooling. The intervention aims to help children become more willing and able to question, reason, construct arguments and collaborate with others. A group of 48 volunteer schools were randomised to receive P4C or act as a control for one year. This paper reports the CAT results for all pupils in years 4 and 5 initially, and the Key Stage 2 attainment in English and Maths for those starting in year 5. There was no school dropout. Individual attrition from a total of 3,159 pupils was around 11 percent—roughly equal between groups. There were small positive ‘effect’ sizes in favour of the P4C group in progress in reading and maths, and even smaller perhaps negligible improvements in CAT scores and writing. The results for the most disadvantaged pupils were larger for attainment, but not for CATs. Observations and interviews suggest that the intervention was generally enjoyable and thought to be beneficial for pupil confidence. Our conclusion is that, for those wishing to improve attainment outcomes in the short term, an emphasis on developing reasoning is promising, especially for the poorest students, but perhaps not the most effective way forward. However, for those who value reasoning for its own sake, this evaluation demonstrates that using curriculum time in this way does not damage attainment, and so suggests that something like P4C is an appropriate educational approach. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. What is Philosophy for Children, What is Philosophy with Children—After Matthew Lipman?Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):171-182.
    Philosophy for Children arose in the 1970s in the US as an educational programme. This programme, initiated by Matthew Lipman, was devoted to exploring the relationship between the notions ‘philosophy’ and ‘childhood’, with the implicit practical goal of establishing philosophy as a full-fledged ‘content area’ in public schools. Over 40 years, the programme has spread worldwide, and the theory and practice of doing philosophy for or with children and young people appears to be of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  12.  24
    Philosophy for Children Through the Secondary Curriculum.Lizzy Lewis & Nick Chandley (eds.) - 2012 - Continuum.
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) is an approach to learning and teaching that aims to develop reasoning and judgement. Students learn to listen to and respect their peers' opinions, think creatively and work together to develop a deeper understanding of concepts central to their own lives and the subjects they are studying. With the teacher adopting the role of facilitator, a true community develops in which rich and meaningful dialogue results in enquiry of the highest order. Each chapter is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  10
    Evaluating Philosophy for Children.Felix García-Moriyón, Irene Rebollo & Roberto Colom - 2005 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 17 (4):14-22.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  14.  37
    Philosophy for Children in Transition: Problems and Prospects.Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  15. Philosophy For Children.Matthew Lipman - 1980 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 1 (1).
    Word of the inauguration of a newsletter on the program in Analytical Thinking that is based in the School of Education at Texas Wesleyan College is indeed welcome. Knowing the energy and expertise of the two administrators of the program, Dean Joe Mitchell and Professor Ronald Reed, I have no doubt that the newsletter will be a success, and I shall look forward to receiving every issue.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  16.  23
    Philosophy for Children: Towards Pedagogical Transformation.R. Scholl, K. Nichols & G. Burgh - 2009 - In Teacher education crossing borders: Cultures, contexts, communities and curriculum; Annual Conference of the Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA). Bathurst, Australia: Australian Teacher Education Association. pp. 1-15.
    Philosophical inquiry has the capacity to push boundaries in teaching and learning interactions with students and improve teacher’s pedagogical experiences. This paper focuses on the potential for Philosophy to foster pedagogical transformation. Two groups of primary school teachers, 59 in total, have been involved in a comparison of pedagogical transformation between teachers who implemented Philosophy and teachers who used thinking tools for conceptual exploration. A mixed methods approach, including, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, was employed to inquire into the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  17. Philosophy for Children: Some Assumptions and Implications.Matthew Lipman - 2009 - In Eva Marsal, Takara Dobashi & Barbara Weber (eds.), Children Philosophize Worldwide: Theoretical and Practical Concepts. Peter Lang. pp. 9--23.
  18. Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman - 1976 - Metaphilosophy 7 (1):17–33.
  19.  12
    Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman - 1976
  20.  45
    Philosophy for Children and the Reconstruction of Philosophy.David Kennedy - 1999 - Metaphilosophy 30 (4):338-359.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21.  67
    Racism as ‘Reasonableness’: Philosophy for Children and the Gated Community of Inquiry.Darren Chetty - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (1):39-54.
    In this paper, I argue that the notion of ‘reasonableness’ that is, for many, at the heart of the Philosophy for Children approach particularly and education for democratic citizenship more broadly, is constituted within the epistemology of ‘white ignorance’ and operates in such a way that it is unlikely to transgress the boundaries of white ignorance so as to view it from without. Drawing on scholarship in critical legal studies and social epistemology, I highlight how notions of reasonableness (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  23
    Philosophy for Children with Learners of English as a Foreign Language.Shiauping Tian & Pei-Fen Liao - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):40-58.
    The present study intends to provide empirical evidence on the effect of Philosophy for Children integrated with English picture storybook instruction on adolescent learners of English as a foreign language. Previous studies have documented the instructional benefits of P4C in various fields; very little evidence, however, can be found in ESL or EFL contexts. The present study was therefore carried out to explore the beneficial effects of P4C applied in EFL instruction with picture storybooks as instructional materials. A (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  42
    Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman - 1982 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 3 (3-4):35-44.
  24.  23
    Philosophy for Children.Michael Pritchard - 2008 - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society.
  25.  28
    Philosophy for Children, Learnification, Intelligent Adaptive Systems and Racism – a Response to Gert Biesta.Darren Chetty - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (28).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  46
    Philosophy for Children and Critical Thinking.Matthew Lipman - 1988 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 7 (4):40-42.
  27. Philosophy for Children: The Continuation of Dewey's Democratic Project.Marie-France Daniel, Michael Schleifer & Pierre Lebouis - 1992 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 13 (1).
    Matthew Lipman is an American philosopher who conceived, in the 1970s, a method to help children think in an autonomous, critical and reasonable way. This method is a global approach which aims to develop the personal as well as the intellectual, the moral and the social aspects of the person; it is an educative project in the broad sense of the term. This holistic project takes the form of a program of philosophy for students from five to fifteen (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  82
    Paulo Freire and Philosophy for Children: A Critical Dialogue.Walter Kohan - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (6):615-629.
    This paper is an attempt to connect the Brazilian Paulo Freire’s well known educational thinking with the “philosophy for children” movement. It considers the relationship between the creator of philosophy for children, Matthew Lipman and Freire through different attempts to establish a relationship between these two educators. The paper shows that the relationship between them is not as close as many supporters of P4C have claimed, especially in Latin America. It also considers the context of Educational (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery.Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30.  51
    Preparing Teachers to 'Teach' Philosophy for Children.Laurance J. Splitter - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    Like many others, I have resisted the idea that education, in general, is a form of training. We always talk about training for something, while an educated person is not educated for any one thing. But for this very reason, I do not wish to abandon the term ‘teacher training’ in favor of ‘teacher education’, although ideally I would prefer to speak of ‘teacher preparation’ because the term ‘training’ always reminds me of monkeys. I shall use the terms ‘training’ and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  28
    Why Philosophy for Children Now?David Kennedy - 1993 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 10 (3):2-6.
  32. Practicality and Philosophy for Children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2004 - Critical and Creative Thinking 12 (2).
  33. Philosophy for Children.Matthew Charles - 2011 - Radical Philosophy 170:45.
  34. Does Philosophy for Children Belong in School at All?Jana Lone - 2001 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 21 (1):151-156.
  35. Philosophy for Children and Other People.William J. Rapaport - 1987 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy (Summer):19-22.
    It is a matter of fact—and has been so for a considerable amount of time—that philosophy is taught at the pre—college level. However, to teach philosophy at that (or at any) level is one thing; to teach it well is quite another. Fortunately, it can be taught well, as a host of successful experiences and programs have shown. But in what ways can it be taught? Are there differences in the ways in which it can or should be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  21
    How Effective is Philosophy for Children in Contributing to the Affective Engagement of Pupils in the Context of Secondary Religious Education?Asha Lancaster-Thomas - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1):102-122.
    This paper reports the findings of a predominantly qualitative study that explored the effects of the practice of Philosophy for Children on pupils’ affective engagement.[1] From its conception, the practice of P4C has been linked to the development of caring and collaborative thinking and the study aimed to closely consider that relationship. An appropriate self-designed P4C program was implemented with 75 Year 9 pupils of Religious Education at an independent secondary school in the United Kingdom. An interpretive research (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  7
    Philosophy for Children Hawaiian Style.Thomas E. Jackson - 2004 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 17 (1-2):4-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Peirce, Feminism, and Philosophy for Children.Ann Margaret Sharp - 1993 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 14 (1).
    The overall purpose of this paper is to explore three related themes: feminist philosophy and philosophy for children have much in common including pegagogy, an inclusive orientation and fallibilist but critical epistemology, both feminism and philosophy for children benefit from a close reading of Peirce, but only philosophy for children draws explicitly on Peirce, and because of this common bond feminist philosophy and philosophy for children provide place to stand against (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  1
    Philosophy for Children and/as Philosophical Practice.Megan Laverty - 2004 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):141-51.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  14
    Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman & Ann Margaret Sharp - 1988 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 7 (4):32-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  21
    Exploring the Connections Between Philosophy for Children and Character Education: Some Implications for Moral Education?Andrew Peterson & Brendan Bentley - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (2):48-70.
    In this paper we are interested in the connections between Philosophy for Children and character education. In sketching these connections we suggest some areas where the relationship is potentially fruitful, particularly in light of research which suggests that in practice schools and teachers often adopt and mix different approaches to values education. We outline some implications of drawing connections between the two fields for moral education. The arguments made in this article are done so in the hope of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  8
    Philosophy for Children.Laurance J. Splitter - 1985 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 5 (4):47-53.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  26
    Avoiding 'Passive Empathy' with Philosophy for Children.Matthew Schertz - 2007 - Journal of Moral Education 36 (2):185-198.
    This essay begins by addressing concerns raised by Megan Boler regarding empathy's conceptual ambiguities and pedagogical effectiveness. This will be followed by a call for a systematic pedagogical approach to educating for empathy based on dialogue. I will argue that in order to be effective, empathic pedagogy should provide students with a means of engaging across the boundaries of the subject by allowing for peer-mediated inquiry-based interactions that support the sharing of affective states. Finally, I will argue that Community of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  66
    Introduction: Thinking Through Philosophy for Children.Maughn Gregory & David Kennedy - 2000 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 19 (2):4-10.
  45.  75
    Philosophy for Children in China:: A Late Preliminary Anti-Report.David Kennedy & Walter Kohan - 2002 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 22 (1):37-49.
    At the very least, even though Chinese schools do not look very different from those in the West, China offers an opportunity for Philosophy for Children to question its basis, its methodology, its aims. It seems to be expressing a different cultural voice, and to be disposed to the kind of dialogue we are more used to claiming than practicing. Both Kunming and Shanghai provide, in their own ways, formidable contexts: the deep, strong and disciplined educators of Railway (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Philosophy for Children as a Teaching Movement in an Era of Too Much Learning.Charles Bingham - 2015 - Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):223-240.
    In this article, I contextualize the community of inquiry approach, and Philosophy for Children, within the current milieu of education. Specifically, I argue that whereas former scholarship on Philosophy for Children had a tendency to critique the problems of teacher authority and knowledge transmission, we must now consider subtler, learner-centered scenarios of education as a threat to Philosophy for Children. I begin by offering a personal anecdote about my own experience attending a ‘reverse-integrated’ elementary (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  28
    Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardosik, Daphne D. Johnson, Debra P. Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1):18-37.
    In this article we report the findings of a randomised control clinical trial that assessed the impact of a Philosophy for Children program and replicated a previous study conducted in Scotland by Topping and Trickey. A Cognitive Abilities Test was administered as a pretest and a posttest to randomly selected experimental groups and control groups. The students in the experimental group engaged in philosophy lessons in a setting of structured, collaborative inquiry in their language arts classes for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48.  11
    The Oaxaca Philosophy for Children Initiative As Place-Based Philosophy: Why Context Matters in Philosophy for Children.Amy Reed-Sandoval - unknown
    In this essay I aim to broaden this discussion of positionality in Philosophy for Children in order to explore the ways that sociopolitical and philosophical context can impact the sorts of questions and discussions generated by children in P4C programs. In particular, I show how the context of Oaxaca City shapes the philosophical contributions of the children of the Oaxaca Philosophy for Children Initiative—in a way that often challenges western philosophical frameworks. I use the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Philosophy for Children and Children’s Philosophical Thinking.Maughn Gregory - 2021 - In Anna Pagès (ed.), A History of Western Philosophy of Education in the Contemporary Landscape. Bloomsbury. pp. 153-177.
    Since the late 1960s, philosophy for children has become a global, multi-disciplinary movement involving innovations in curriculum, pedagogy, educational theory, and teacher education; in moral, social and political philosophy; and in discourse and literary theory. And it has generated the new academic field of philosophy of childhood. Gareth B. Matthews (1929-2011) traced contemporary disrespect for children to Aristotle, for whom the child is essentially a pre-intellectual and pre-moral precursor to the fully realized human adult. Matthews (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Elephant in the Room: Picturebooks, Philosophy for Children and Racism.Darren Chetty - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):11-31.
    Whilst continuing racism is often invoked as evidence of the urgent need for Philosophy for Children, there is little in the current literature that addresses the topic. Drawing on Critical Race Theory and the related field of Critical Whiteness Studies , I argue that racism is deeply ingrained culturally in society, and best understood in the context of ‘Whiteness’. Following a CRT-informed analysis of two picturebooks that have been recommended as starting points for philosophical enquiry into multiculturalism, racism (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000