Search results for 'Philosophy for Childrens' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George F. Mclean & Council for Research in Values and Philosophy (1989). Reading Philosophy for the Xxist Century.
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  2. Wesley Cragg & International Society for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (1992). Retributivism and its Critics Canadian Section of the International Society for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy : Papers of the Special Nordic Conference Held at the University of Toronto, 25-27 June 1990. [REVIEW]
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  3. F. C. Hutley & International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (1979). Law and the Future of Society a Selection of Papers Presented to the Extraordinary World Congress of the Internat. Assoc. For Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy , Held in Sydney and Canberra, Australia, on 14-21 August, 1977. [REVIEW]
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  4. Mikael M. International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, Karlsson & Ólafur Páll Jónsson (1995). Law, Justice and the State Nordic Perspectives : Proceedings of the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy , Reykjavík, 26 May-2 June, 1993. [REVIEW]
     
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  5. Peter Ratcliffe, Martin Warner & Royal Institute of Philosophy (1986). Philosophy Graduates and Jobs a Report Prepared for the Royal Institute of Philosophy. The Institute & the University of Warwick.
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  6.  5
    Arie Kizel (2014). Communication Discourse and Cyberspace: Challenges to Philosophy for Children. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 20 (3-4):40 – 44.
    This article addresses the principal challenges the philosophy for children (P4C) educator/practitioner faces today, particularly in light of the multi-channel communication environment that threatens to undermine the philosophical enterprise as a whole and P4C in particular. It seeks to answer the following questions: a) What status does P4C hold as promoting a community of inquiry in an era in which the school discourse finds itself in growing competition with a communication discourse driven by traditional media tools?; b) What philosophical (...)
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  7.  64
    William C. Wimsatt (2007). Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings: Piecewise Approximations to Reality. Harvard University Press.
    This book offers a philosophy for error-prone humans trying to understand messy systems in the real world.
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  8.  76
    Marie-France Daniel & Emmanuelle Auriac (2011). Philosophy, Critical Thinking and Philosophy for Children1. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):415-435.
    For centuries, philosophy has been considered as an intellectual activity requiring complex cognitive skills and predispositions related to complex (or critical) thinking. The Philosophy for Children (P4C) approach aims at the development of critical thinking in pupils through philosophical dialogue. Some contest the introduction of P4C in the classroom, suggesting that the discussions it fosters are not philosophical in essence. In this text, we argue that P4C is philosophy.
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  9.  6
    Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (2017). From Harry to Philosophy Park: The Development of Philosophy for Children Resources in Australia. In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Routledge. pp. 163-170.
    We offer an overview of the development and production of the diverse range of Australian P4C literature since the introduction of philosophy in schools in the early 1980s. The events and debates surrounding this literature can be viewed as an historical narrative that highlights different philosophical, educational, and strategic positions on the role of curriculum material and resources in the philosophy classroom. We argue that if we place children’s literature and purpose-written materials in opposition to one another, we (...)
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  10.  21
    Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen (2016). Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by challenging the (...)
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  11. Charles Bingham (2015). Philosophy for Children as a Teaching Movement in an Era of Too Much Learning. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):223-240.
    In this article, I contextualize the community of inquiry approach, and Philosophy for Children, within the current milieu of education. Specifically, I argue that whereas former scholarship on Philosophy for Children had a tendency to critique the problems of teacher authority and knowledge transmission, we must now consider subtler, learner-centered scenarios of education as a threat to Philosophy for Children. I begin by offering a personal anecdote about my own experience attending a ‘reverse-integrated’ elementary school in 1968. (...)
     
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  12.  14
    Karin Murris (2016). The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think in (...)
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  13.  5
    Andrew Fisher (2007). Philosophy for Teens: Questioning Life's Big Ideas, by Sharon M. Kaye and Paul Thomson. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):232-233.
    A review of "Philosophy for teens: Questioning life's big ideas" by Sharon M. Kaye and Paul Thomson.
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  14. Maria Miraglia (2014). Philosophy for Children and Territorial Educational Laboratories: A Succeed Experiment. Childhood and Philosophy 9 (18):381-400.
    The article examines the need to increase an education toward the development of complex thinking in urban areas where there is a considerable amount of social unrest. The school often fails to bridge the gap between educator/education and learner and this happens in particular when it comes to kids ‘disadvantaged’. The P4C is a pedagogical method that can heal this divide, inter alia, through its dialogic practice. The practice of philosophy can became a way to bridge the sense of (...)
     
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  15.  35
    Billy Joe Lucas (2012). The Right to Believe Truth Paradoxes of Moral Regret for No Belief and the Role(s) of Logic in Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (2):115-138.
    I offer you some theories of intellectual obligations and rights (virtue Ethics): initially, RBT (a Right to Believe Truth, if something is true it follows one has a right to believe it), and, NDSM (one has no right to believe a contradiction, i.e., No right to commit Doxastic Self-Mutilation). Evidence for both below. Anthropology, Psychology, computer software, Sociology, and the neurosciences prove things about human beliefs, and History, Economics, and comparative law can provide evidence of value about theories of rights. (...)
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  16.  88
    Jennifer Bleazby (2011). Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
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  17. Karen Mizell (2015). Philosophy for Children, Community of INquiry, and Human Rights Education. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):319-328.
    The Community of Inquiry is a unique discourse model that brings adults and children together in collaborative discussions of philosophical and ethical topics. This paper examines the potential for COI to deepen children’s moral and intellectual understanding through recursive discourse that encourages them to transcend cultural limitations, confront their own moral predispositions, and increase inter-cultural understanding. As children become familiar with normative values couched in ethical dialogue, they are immersed in ideals of reciprocity and empathy. Such dialogues can become effective (...)
     
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  18.  32
    Sevket Benhur Oral (2013). Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme? Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.
  19.  9
    Henry J. Perkinson (1976). Philosophy for Education. Journal of Pre-College Philosophy 2 (2):17-20.
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  20. Jennifer Bleazby (2004). Practicality and Philosophy for Children. Critical and Creative Thinking 12 (2).
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  21.  19
    Maughn Gregory & David Kennedy (2000). Introduction to Special Issue on Philosophy for Children. Inquiry 19 (2):4-10.
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  22.  39
    Joseph Chan (2014). Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times. Princeton University Press.
    Since the very beginning, Confucianism has been troubled by a serious gap between its political ideals and the reality of societal circumstances. Contemporary Confucians must develop a viable method of governance that can retain the spirit of the Confucian ideal while tackling problems arising from nonideal modern situations. The best way to meet this challenge, Joseph Chan argues, is to adopt liberal democratic institutions that are shaped by the Confucian conception of the good rather than the liberal conception of the (...)
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  23. Nigel Stepp, Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey (2011). Philosophy for the Rest of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):425-437.
    Cognitive science has always included multiple methodologies and theoretical commitments. The philosophy of cognitive science should embrace, or at least acknowledge, this diversity. Bechtel’s (2009a) proposed philosophy of cognitive science, however, applies only to representationalist and mechanist cognitive science, ignoring the substantial minority of dynamically oriented cognitive scientists. As an example of nonrepresentational, dynamical cognitive science, we describe strong anticipation as a model for circadian systems (Stepp & Turvey, 2009). We then propose a philosophy of science appropriate (...)
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  24.  16
    Dae-Ryun Chung (2008). A Study on Developing Picture Books and Parent-Teacher Manuals for Philosophy for Korean Young Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:111-122.
    This paper is a short report about a series of picture books and manuals designed for P4C (especially Philosophy for Korean Young Children). There were not proper educational reading materials or books to help Korean young children to think by (or for) themselves and dialogue with. Dr. Sharp’s is a very helpful guidebook for young children to think by themselves, dialogue with friends, and discuss with others (peers, older or younger children, teacher and parents, etc.). However, there (...)
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  25.  15
    Marzena Parzych (2008). Philosophy for Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:71-79.
    Philosophy for Children: In the Historical Perspective of the Progressive Nature of Human Consciousness. This paper will examine the importance of the Critical Thinking Movement and the Philosophy for Children Programme in a larger, more inclusive, and innovative perspective. The paper will explain why the CriticalThinking Movement appeared in our time and then offer a new interpretation of the importance of the Philosophy for Children Program – with both seen in a novel historical perspective as well as (...)
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  26.  12
    Mitsuyo Toyoda (2008). Applying Philosophy for Children to Workshop-Style Environmental Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:101-109.
    This paper examines possible applications of ideas and methods of Philosophy for Children (P4C) to workshop-style environmental education conducted in Sado, Japan. The theme of the workshop is the preservation of toki (the crested ibis) and the local community development. As a result of the success in new breeding, it was determined that the toki, which once became extinct in Japan, would be released to the natural environment in 2008. In order to achieve its successful settlement, local residents are (...)
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  27. Brett Calcott (2011). Wimsatt and the Robustness Family: Review of Wimsatt's Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):281-293.
    This review of Wimsatt’s book Re-engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings focuses on analysing his use of robustness, a central theme in the book. I outline a family of three distinct conceptions of robustness that appear in the book, and look at the different roles they play. I briefly examine what underwrites robustness, and suggest that further work is needed to clarify both the structure of robustness and the relation between it various conceptions.
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  28. William P. Bechtel (1988). Philosophy of Mind: An Overview for Cognitive Science. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Specifically designed to make the philosophy of mind intelligible to those not trained in philosophy, this book provides a concise overview for students and researchers in the cognitive sciences. Emphasizing the relevance of philosophical work to investigations in other cognitive sciences, this unique text examines such issues as the meaning of language, the mind-body problem, the functionalist theories of cognition, and intentionality. As he explores the philosophical issues, Bechtel draws connections between philosophical views and theoretical and experimental work (...)
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  29. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (2):381-408.
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, (...)
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  30. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). Philosophy Seminars for Five-Year-Olds,. Learning for Democracy 1 (2):71-77.
    We need a revolution in education, from five year olds onwards, so that exploration of problems is at the heart of the enterprise.
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  31.  24
    Jane Drexler (2015). Philosophy for General Education. Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):289-305.
    This article explores the value of teaching Environmental Ethics as an introductory-level general education course for non-majors. It focuses on how philosophy can help students discern multiple voices within discourses, texts and thinking, and by doing so disrupt several untenable mental paradigms that new and underprepared students often bring with them to college: fixed and dualistic notions of truth, relativistic conceptions of difference, and decontextualized approaches to issues and ideas. This article also presents examples of class activities that are (...)
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  32. Patricia Shipley & Fernando Leal (2002). Is Practical Philosophy for Private Profit or Public Good? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 9 (1):1-9.
    This paper takes a critical look at the rise of the practice of philosophy in the market place in late modernity. Two main forms of such practice are identified: the practice of Socratic Dialogue in small groups in organisations and one-to-one philosophical counselling of individual 'clients'. The relevance of professionalism for commercialised applied practical philosophy is discussed. Philosophical counsellors in particular may be at risk of engaging with vulnerable individuals who are in need of protection from practitioners who (...)
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  33.  11
    Yong-Sock Chang & Ji–Young Kim (2008). Visual Culture Education Through the Philosophy for Children Program. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:27-34.
    The appearance of mass media and a versatile medium of videos can serve the convenience and instructive information for children; on the other hand, it could abet them in implicit image consumption. Now is the time for kids' to be in need of thinking power which enables them to make a choice, applications andcriticism of information within such visual cultures. In spite of these social changes, the realities are that our curriculum still doesn't meet a learner's demand properly. This research, (...)
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  34.  11
    Greg Littmann (2014). Writing Philosophy for the Public is a Moral Obligation. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):103-116.
    Writing philosophy to be read by people who are not professional philosophers ought to be central to the work of professional philosophers. Writing for the public should be central to their work because their professional end is to produce ideas for use by people who are not professional philosophers. Philosophy is unlike most disciplines in that the ideas produced by professional philosophers generally have to be understood by a person before they can be of any use to them. (...)
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  35.  6
    Patricia Shipley (2000). Is Practical Philosophy for Private Profit or Public Good? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (4):65-74.
    This paper takes a critical look at the rise of the practice of philosophy in the market place in late modernity. Two main forms of such practice are identified: the practice of Socratic Dialogue in small groups in organisations and one-to-one philosophical counselling of individual 'clients'. The relevance of professionalism for commercialised applied practical philosophy is discussed. Philosophical counsellors in particular may be at risk of engaging with vulnerable individuals who are in need of protection from practitioners who (...)
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  36.  13
    Maryann Ayim (1976). A Justification for Teaching Philosophy In The High School. Journal of Pre-College Philosophy 2 (2):20-22.
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  37.  46
    Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) (1992). Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
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  38. Michael Hauskeller (2011). No Philosophy for Swine: John Stuart Mill on the Quality of Pleasures. Utilitas 23 (04):428-446.
    I argue that Mill introduced the distinction between quality and quantity of pleasures in order to fend off the then common charge that utilitarianism is ‘a philosophy for swine’ and to accommodate the (still) widespread intuition that the life of a human is better, in the sense of being intrinsically more valuable, than the life of an animal. I argue that in this he fails because in order to do successfully he would have to show not only that the (...)
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  39.  7
    David M. Steffes (2007). Panpsychic Organicism: Sewall Wright's Philosophy for Understanding Complex Genetic Systems. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):327 - 361.
    Sewall Wright first encountered the complex systems characteristic of gene combinations while a graduate student at Harvard's Bussey Institute from 1912 to 1915. In Mendelian breeding experiments, Wright observed a hierarchical dependence of the organism's phenotype on dynamic networks of genetic interaction and organization. An animal's physical traits, and thus its autonomy from surrounding environmental constraints, depended greatly on how genes behaved in certain combinations. Wright recognized that while genes are the material determinants of the animal phenotype, operating with great (...)
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  40.  38
    Liu Gang (2007). Philosophy of Information and Foundation for the Future Chinese Philosophy of Science and Technology. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):95-114.
    The research programme of the philosophy of information (PI) proposed in 2002 made it an independent area or discipline in philosophical research. The scientific concept of ‘information’ is formally accepted in philosophical inquiry. Hence a new and tool-driven philosophical discipline of PI with its interdisciplinary nature has been established. Philosophy of information is an ‘orientative’ rather than ‘cognitive’ philosophy. When PI is under consideration in the history of Western philosophy, it can be regarded as a shift (...)
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  41. Fritz Allhoff, Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.) (2011). Coffee - Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Offering philosophical insights into the popular morning brew, _Coffee -- Philosophy for Everyone_ kick starts the day with an entertaining but critical discussion of the ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and culture of coffee. Matt Lounsbury of pioneering business Stumptown Coffee discusses just how good coffee can be Caffeine-related chapters cover the ethics of the coffee trade, the metaphysics of coffee and the centrality of the coffee house to the public sphere Includes a foreword by Donald Schoenholt, President at Gillies Coffee (...)
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  42. Diogenes Allen & Eric O. Springsted (eds.) (1992). Primary Readings in Philosophy for Understanding Theology. Westminster/John Knox Press.
    This new anthology provides primary texts undergirding Diogenes Allen's earlier work, Philosophy for Understanding Theology, making for a valuable theological ...
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  43. Steven M. Cahn & Delia Graff Fara (eds.) (2003). Philosophy for the 21st Century: A Comprehensive Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy for the 21st Century, an introductory anthology, is an extraordinarily comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings. It covers all major fields, including not only metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of religion, but also philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, political philosophy, and philosophy of art. This volume is unique in drawing on the judgments of a new generation of scholars, each of whom has chosen the articles and provided (...)
     
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  44.  63
    Siobhan Chapman (2000). Philosophy for Linguists: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Philosophy for Linguists provides students with a clear, concise introduction to the main topics in the philosophy of language. Focusing on what linguists need to know and how philosophy relates to modern linguistics, the book is structured around key branches of linguistics: semantics, pragmatics, and language acquisition. Assuming no prior knowledge of philosophy, Siobhan Chapman traces the history and development of ideas in the philosophy of language and outlines the contributions of specific philosophers. The book (...)
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  45. Martin Cohen (2011). Philosophy for Dummies. John Wiley.
    Confused by metaphysics? In a muddle with aesthetics? Intimidated by Kant? Then look no further! _Philosophy For Dummies, UK Edition_ is a complete crash-course in philosophical thought, covering key philosophers, philosophical history and theory and the big questions that affect us today. Tying in with standard UK curricula and including core topics such as logic, ethics and political philosophy, this impartial, expert guide cuts through the jargon to give you the facts. Whether you're a philosophy student or a (...)
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  46. Sánchez Flores & Mónica Judith (2005). Political Philosophy for the Global Age. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In a time of globalization, Political Philosophy for the Global Age provides a theoretical basis for the convergence of human values in terms of legitimate conceptions of time, language, and notions of self. Sánchez Flores reviews what she considers to be the most important positions in the current debate on political theory (liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and postcolonialism) and also proposes her own original contribution. Sánchez Flores’s unique approach is a critique of a type of morality formulated solely on the (...)
     
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  47.  19
    Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza & Michael W. Austin (eds.) (2010). Cycling - Philosophy for Everyone: A Philosophical Tour de Force. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Covering interesting and varied philosophical terrain, _Cycling - Philosophy for Everyone_ explores in a fun but critical way the rich philosophical, cultural, and existential experiences that arise when two wheels are propelled by human energy. Incorporates or reflects the views of high-profile and notable past-professional cyclists and insiders such as Lennard Zinn, Scott Tinley, and Lance Armstrong Features contributions from the areas of cultural studies, kinesiology, literature, and political science as well as from philosophers Includes enlightening essays on the (...)
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  48.  18
    Nathan Kowalsky (ed.) (2010). Hunting--Philosophy for Everyone in Search of the Wild Life. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hunting---Philosophy for Everyone Presents a thought-provoking collection of new essays from across the academic and non-academic spectrum that move far beyound ...
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  49.  52
    Michael Lacewing (2009). Philosophy for A2: Unit 4. Routledge.
    Philosophy for AS is the definitive textbook for students of the current AQA Advanced Subsidiary Level. Structured closely around the examination specifications, it covers the two units of the AS Level in an exceptionally clear and student-friendly style. As an invitation to philosophy, the book encourages and enables students to engage philosophically with the following syllabus topics: reason and experience Why should I be governed? Why should I be moral? the idea of God persons knowledge of the external (...)
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  50.  62
    Michael Lacewing (2009). Philosophy for A2: Unit 3. Routledge.
    Philosophy for AS is the definitive textbook for students of the current AQA Advanced Subsidiary Level. Structured closely around the examination specifications, it covers the two units of the AS Level in an exceptionally clear and student-friendly style. As an invitation to philosophy, the book encourages and enables students to engage philosophically with the following syllabus topics: reason and experience Why should I be governed? Why should I be moral? the idea of God persons knowledge of the external (...)
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