Results for 'Philosophy in schools'

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  1.  6
    Philosophy in Schools: Then and Now.Megan J. Laverty - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    It is twelve years since the article you are about to read was published. During that time, the philosophy in schools movement has expanded and diversified in response to curriculum developments, teaching guides, web-based resources, dissertations, empirical research and theoretical scholarship. Philosophy and philosophy of education journals regularly publish articles and special issues on pre-college philosophy. There are more opportunities for undergraduate and graduate philosophy students to practice and research philosophy for/with children in (...)
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  2.  6
    Plato, Metacognition and Philosophy in Schools.Peter Worley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
    In this article, I begin by saying something about what metacognition is and why it is desirable within education. I then outline how Plato anticipates this concept in his dialogue Meno. This is not just a historical point; by dividing the cognitive self into a three-in-one—a ‘learner’, a ‘teacher’ and an ‘evaluator’—Plato affords us a neat metaphorical framework for understanding metacognition that, I contend, is valuable today. In addition to aiding our understanding of this concept, Plato’s model of metacognition not (...)
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  3.  8
    The 2016 Federation of Australasian Philosophy in Schools Associations Conference Report.Vanya Kovach - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (2).
    The theme of the 2016 FAPSA Conference, held in Wellington, New Zealand, was ‘Philosophy throughout the school years’.[1] When we at P4CNZ chose this theme, we were hoping to attract, as presenters and participants, educators working with students from the first to the last years of school. Such a range, we hoped, would demonstrate the broad relevance of philosophical inquiry, and provide wonderful professional development opportunities for all of our P4C colleagues in New Zealand, and for our visitors from (...)
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  4. The Philosophy of Social Segregation in Israel's Democratic Schools.Arie Kizel - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (11):1042 – 1050.
    Democratic private schools in Israel are a part of the neo-liberal discourse. They champion the dialogic philosophy associated with its most prominent advocates—Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas—together with Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy, the humanistic psychology propounded by Carl Rogers, Nel Noddings’s pedagogy of care and concern, and even Gadamer’s integrative hermeneutic perspective. Democratic schools form one of the greatest challenges to State education and most vocal and active critique of the focus conservative education places on exams and achievement. (...)
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  5.  20
    Philosophy in Schools: An Australian Perspective.Burgh Gilbert - 2017 - In Saeed Naji & Rosnani Hashim (eds.), History, Theory and Practices of Philosophy for Children: International Perspectives. London: Routledge. pp. 157-166.
    An interview that addresses the issue of the development of philosophy in schools in Australia, that suggests it is the educational culture that has had the most effect on modifying Matthew Lipman's philosophy for children, leading to a proliferation of new materials.
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  6.  23
    Philosophy in Schools.Debbie Whittaker - 2008 - Questions 8:2-2.
    Description of the Center for the Advancement of Philosophy in the Schools (CAPS) program at California State University, Long Beach. The program places undergraduate philosophy students in area schools to lead pre-college students in various philosophical learning activities.
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  7.  15
    Philosophy in Schools: A Catholic School Perspective.Sean Whittle - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):590-606.
    This article builds on the recent Special Interest issue of this journal on ‘Philosophy for Children in Transition’ and the way that the debate about philosophy in schools has now shifted to whether or not it ought to be a compulsory part of the curriculum. This article puts the spotlight on Catholic schools in order to present a different argument in favour of introducing compulsory philosophy lessons into the curriculum. It is explained that in faith (...)
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  8.  24
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools.Jana Mohr Lone & Michael D. Burroughs - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools is intended for philosophers and philosophy students, precollege classroom teachers, administrators and educators, policymakers, and pre-college practitioners of all kinds. This text book offers a wealth of practical resources and lesson plans for use in precollege classrooms, as well as consideration of many of the broader educational, social, and political topics in the field.
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  9. The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D'Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
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  10. Philosophy Goes to School in Australia: A History 1982-2016.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):59-83.
    This paper is an attempt to highlight significant developments in the history of philosophy in schools in Australia. We commence by looking at the early years when Laurance Splitter visited the Institute for the Advancement for Philosophy for Children (IAPC). Then we offer an account of the events that led to the formation of what is now the Federation of Australasian Philosophy in Schools Associations (FAPSA), the development and production of a diverse range of curriculum (...)
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  11.  84
    Philosophy in Philosophy in Schools.Peter Worley - 2009 - Think 8 (23):63-75.
    There has recently been a great deal written about philosophy in schools and in this article I shall be addressing some of the main concerns raised in objection to philosophy with young people. By young people I have in mind those in primary school from reception through to Year 6.
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  12. Philosophy in Schools.Felicity Haynes (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    In 1972, Matthew Lipman founded the Institute of Advancement for Philosophy for Children, producing a series of novels and teaching manuals promoting philosophical inquiry at all levels of schooling. The programme consisted of stories about children discussing traditional topics of ethics, values, logic, reality, perception, and politics, as they related to their own daily experiences. Philosophy for Children has been adapted beyond the IAPC texts, but the process remains one of an open community of inquiry in which teachers (...)
     
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  13.  13
    Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardoski, Daphne Johnson, Debra Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    In this article we report the findings of a randomised control clinical trial that assessed the impact of a Philosophy for Children program and replicated a previous study conducted in Scotland by Topping and Trickey. A Cognitive Abilities Test was administered as a pretest and a posttest to randomly selected experimental groups and control groups. The students in the experimental group engaged in philosophy lessons in a setting of structured, collaborative inquiry in their language arts classes for one (...)
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  14.  28
    Philosophy in Primary Schools?John White - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):449-460.
    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the Journal of Philosophy of Education Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on ‘Philosophy for Children in Transition’, so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result is patchy; many, but not all, of the papers in the Special Issue deal with issues far (...)
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  15. The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active (...)
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  16.  14
    A Handy Account of Philosophy in Schools.Clinton Golding - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    Philosophy in Schools is a complex educational practice, unfamiliar to most teachers and philosophers, subtly different to similar forms of education, and so easy to misunderstand and mishandle. Because of this, a common worry for practitioners is whether they are doing it properly. Given this slipperiness of Philosophy in Schools, one of my main concerns has been to give an account that would be useful; that could guide practitioners to teach well. I presented my first account (...)
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  17.  6
    Secular Life Philosophy as a Subject in Schools in Norway.Kristian Horn - 1981 - Journal of Moral Education 10 (2):109-116.
    Abstract In Norway changes in legislation in recent years have loosened the firm hold of the philosophy of the Christian Church in the schools and given room for alternative secular philosophy both in elementary schools and in teachers? colleges.
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  18. Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School. Education Studies.Sue Lyle & Thomas Williams - 2012 - Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children (P4C) on classroom practice. this paper responds on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority (LA) officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in P4C carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teacher.s Interviews (...)
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  19.  9
    Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardosik, Daphne D. Johnson, Debra P. Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
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  20.  90
    Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is (...)
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  21.  21
    Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School.Sue Lyle & Junnine Thomas-Williams - 2012 - Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children on classroom practice. This paper reports on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in Philosophy for Children carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teachers. (...)
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  22.  26
    Philosophy in Schools: Can Early Exposure Help Solve Philosophy's Gender Problem?Gina Schouten - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):275-292.
    In this article, I explore a new reason in favor of precollegiate philosophy: It could help narrow the persistent gender disparity within the discipline. I catalog some of the most widely endorsed explanations for the underrepresentation of women in philosophy and argue that, on each hypothesized explanation, precollegiate philosophy instruction could help improve our discipline's gender balance. Explanations I consider include stereotype threat, gendered philosophical intuitions, inhospitable disciplinary environment, lack of same-sex role models for women students in (...)
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  23.  3
    The Fate of Commentary in the Philosophy of the Schools, C.1550–1640.Michael Edwards - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (4):519-536.
    (2012). THE FATE OF COMMENTARY IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SCHOOLS, C.1550–1640. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 519-536. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.725558.
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  24. The Middle Works of John Dewey, Volume 8, 1899 - 1924: Essays and Miscellany in the 1915 Period and German Philosophy and Politics and Schools of Tomorrow. [REVIEW]Jo Ann Boydston (ed.) - 1979 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    Volume 8 comprises all Dewey’s pub­lished writings for the year 1915—and_ _only_ _for 1915,_ _a year of typically ele­vated productivity, which saw publica­tion of fifteen articles and miscellaneous pieces and three books, two of which are reprinted here: _German Philosophy and Politics _and _Schools of Tomorrow._ Professor Hook says that the publica­tions in this volume reveal John Dewey at the height of his philosophical pow­ers. Even though his greatest works were still to come—_Democracy and Education_,_ Experience and Nature_,_ The (...)
     
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  25.  26
    Philosophy in the Schools Project.David A. Shapiro - 2002 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:8-8.
    In the pursuit of a quality and well-rounded education with philosophy, Shapiro conducts an introductory lesson to students and teachers alike in order to develop deeper, more philosophical questions from their students. Academically, the article expands detail on tutoring in philosophy, analytical practices, and metaphysical activities.
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  26.  13
    Values Education in Schools: A Resource Book for Student Inquiry.Mark Freakley, Gilbert Burgh & Lyne Tilt MacSporran - 2008 - Camberwell, Vic, Australia: ACER.
    Values Education in Schools is a new resource for teachers involved in values and ethics education. It provides a range of 'practical philosophy' resources for secondary school teachers that can be used in English, religious education, citizenship, personal development and social science subjects. The materials include narratives to engage students in philosophical inquiry, doing ethics through the activity of philosophy, not simply learning about it.
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  27.  62
    Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers, Ed. Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak, and Thomas E. Wartenberg. [REVIEW]Christina Hendricks - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):339-343.
  28.  8
    Philosophy in Schools[REVIEW]Tim Sprod - 2012 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 20 (1-2):91-93.
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  29.  23
    The Teaching of Philosophy in American High Schools.Douglas N. Morgan & Charner Perry - 1958 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 32:91-137.
    The following statement is a report of the Committee on Philosophy in Education of the American Philosophical Association and was approved by the Association's Board of Officers in December, 1958. The Committee was composed of the following: C. W. Hendel, Chairman, H. G. Alexander, R. M. Chisholm, Max Fisch, Lucius Garvin, Douglas Morgan, A. E. Murphy, Charner Perry and R. G. Turnbull. Primary responsibility for the preparation of this report belonged to a subcommittee composed of Douglas N. Morgan, Chairman, (...)
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  30.  6
    Philosophy in Schools[REVIEW]Tim Sprod - 2009 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 19 (2-3):97-99.
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  31.  4
    PERSPECTIVES: The Center for the Advancement of Philosophy in Schools.Sara Goering - 2002 - Questions 2:10-10.
    Goering writes on the perspectives of her students through contrasting philosophy to unrelated anthological texts which include language arts and history.
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  32.  12
    Plato Systematized: Doing Philosophy In The Imperial Schools: A Discussion of Justin A. Stover (Ed.), A New Work by Apuleius. [REVIEW]Mauro Bonazzi - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 53.
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  33.  17
    Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers.Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak & Thomas E. Wartenberg (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice?
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  34.  16
    Aberdeen’s Centre for Philosophy in Schools.Eric Matthews - 1988 - Cogito 2 (3):20-21.
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  35.  11
    Philosophy in Schools and Democracy.Guy Stock - 1987 - Cogito 1 (1):19-21.
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  36.  47
    Philosophy in High Schools: Guest Editors' Introduction to a Special Issue of Teaching Philosophy.Jana Mohr Lone & Mitchell Green - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):213-215.
  37.  29
    Philosophy in German Secondary Schools.Gerhard Schmitt - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):257-264.
  38.  7
    Filozofia W Szkołach Jezuickich W Polsce W XVI Wieku [Philosophy in Jesuit Schools in Poland in the 16th Century].Kazimierz Puchowski - 1997 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 2:284-288.
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  39.  18
    Philosophy in Schools – By M. Hand & C. Winstanley.Leon Benade - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):808-811.
  40.  4
    Philosophy in Schools.George Ross - 1988 - Philosophy of Education 22 (2):207-219.
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  41.  11
    Philosophy in Schools.George Macdonald Ross - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):207–219.
  42.  32
    Philosophy in Schools. By M. Hand and C. Winstanley, C. (Eds). [REVIEW]Mary Healy - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):167-169.
  43.  5
    Philosophy in Schools.Debbie Whittaker - 2008 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 8:2-2.
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  44.  3
    Philosophy in Schools: A Reply to Jonathan & Blake.George Ross - 1988 - Philosophy of Education 22 (2):229-238.
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  45.  12
    Philosophy in Schools: A Request for Clarification.Ruth Jonathan & Nigel Blake - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):221–227.
  46. Philosophy in Schools.Michael Hand & Carrie Winstanley (eds.) - 2008 - London: Continuum.
  47.  13
    Philosophy and Ethics in Western Australian Secondary Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-13.
    The introduction of Philosophy and Ethics to the Western Australian Certificate of Education courses in 2008 brought philosophy into the Western Australian secondary school curriculum for the first time. How philosophy came to be included is part of a larger story about the commitment and perseverance of a relatively small number of Australian educators and their belief in the value of introducing philosophical communities of inquiry into school classrooms through a revised pedagogy which could sit comfortably with (...)
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  48.  10
    Philosophy in Spanish Schools.John White - 1988 - Cogito 2 (3):32-33.
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  49. The Teaching of Philosophy in the Upper Secondary Schools in Western Europe: A Survey.Sven Erik Nordenbo - 1989 - Danish Institute for Educational Research.
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  50.  7
    Unexamined Lives: The Case for Philosophy in Schools.M. J. Whalley - 1987 - British Journal of Educational Studies 35 (3):260-280.
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