Results for 'Philosophy of Human Rights'

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  1. To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights.Adam Etinson - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  2. Philosophy for Children, Community of INquiry, and Human Rights Education.Karen Mizell - 2015 - Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):319-328.
    The Community of Inquiry is a unique discourse model that brings adults and children together in collaborative discussions of philosophical and ethical topics. This paper examines the potential for COI to deepen children’s moral and intellectual understanding through recursive discourse that encourages them to transcend cultural limitations, confront their own moral predispositions, and increase inter-cultural understanding. As children become familiar with normative values couched in ethical dialogue, they are immersed in ideals of reciprocity and empathy. Such dialogues can become effective (...)
     
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  3.  16
    The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights.Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  4.  65
    Human Dignity, Capital Punishment, and an African Moral Theory: Toward a New Philosophy of Human Rights.Thaddeus Metz - 2010 - Journal of Human Rights 9 (1):81-99.
    In this article I spell out a conception of dignity grounded in African moral thinking that provides a plausible philosophical foundation for human rights, focusing on the particular human right not to be executed by the state. I first demonstrate that the South African Constitutional Court’s sub-Saharan explanations of why the death penalty is degrading all counterintuitively entail that using deadly force against aggressors is degrading as well. Then, I draw on one major strand of Afro-communitarian thought (...)
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  5. The Philosophy of Human Rights.Patrick Hayden - 2001 - Paragon House.
  6.  17
    Human Rights and Human Diversity: An Essay in the Philosophy of Human Rights.A. J. M. Milne - 1986 - State University of New York Press.
    He argues that an adequate idea of human rights must take such a diversity seriously, and unlike the UN Declaration, it must not presuppose Western institutions and values.
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  7. The Philosophy of Human Rights: International Perspectives.Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed.) - 1980 - Greenwood Press.
     
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  8. The Enlightenment Idea of Human Rights in Philosophy and Education and Postmodern Criticism.Christoph Lüth, Dieter Jedan, Thomas Altfelix & Rita E. Guare (eds.) - 2002 - Winkler.
     
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  9.  10
    On the Use and Abuse of History in Philosophy of Human Rights.Lena Halldenius - unknown
    History plays an important role in the philosophy of human rights, more so than in philosophical discussions on related concepts, such as justice. History tends to be used in order to make it credible that there is a tradition of rights as a moral idea, or an ethical ideal, that transcends national boundaries. In the example that I investigate in this chapter, this moral idea is tightly spun around the moral dignity of the human person. (...)
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  10. The Philosophy of Human Rights: A Systematic Introduction.Anat Biletzki - 2016 - Routledge.
    During the last 20 years, philosophers from different quarters and with very different approaches have begun to theorize human rights in an outpouring of authored and edited books and journal articles. In addition, among policy makers and in the legal arena—the so called workings fields of human rights—there have been noteworthy investigations of human rights that tackle philosophical issues. In this book, Anat Biletzki brings a systematic approach to the multitudinous philosophical analyses of (...) rights, offering a cohesive overview and analysis of this diverse but now very active field. She explores both the conceptual and historical treatments of human rights and the roots of its practice and examines its derivation from classical theories of rights all the way to existing uses. The book is "contemporary" in two senses: it investigates the most current human rights issues and it addresses emerging criticism of human rights, now arising in various sectors. A long introduction provides background information on the history of human rights, a synopsis of modern-day documents, and an articulation of basic questions. This is followed by a section on the philosophical groundings of human rights, proceeding from a philosophy of rights, to specific theories of human rights, to the questions of universalism vs. relativism. The third sections focuses on specific philosophical issues in human rights, including cultural relativity, economic rights, women’s rights, group, indigenous, and minority rights, security, and sovereignty and humanitarian intervention. And a final section on critiques of human rights has separate chapters on postmodernism, anti-foundationalism, and human rights discourse and practice. (shrink)
     
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  11. The Philosophy of Human Rights: A Systematic Introduction.Anat Biletzki - 2017 - Routledge.
    During the last 20 years, philosophers from different quarters and with very different approaches have begun to theorize human rights in an outpouring of authored and edited books and journal articles. In addition, among policy makers and in the legal arena—the so called workings fields of human rights—there have been noteworthy investigations of human rights that tackle philosophical issues. In this book, Anat Biletzki brings a systematic approach to the multitudinous philosophical analyses of (...) rights, offering a cohesive overview and analysis of this diverse but now very active field. She explores both the conceptual and historical treatments of human rights and the roots of its practice and examines its derivation from classical theories of rights all the way to existing uses. The book is "contemporary" in two senses: it investigates the most current human rights issues and it addresses emerging criticism of human rights, now arising in various sectors. A long introduction provides background information on the history of human rights, a synopsis of modern-day documents, and an articulation of basic questions. This is followed by a section on the philosophical groundings of human rights, proceeding from a philosophy of rights, to specific theories of human rights, to the questions of universalism vs. relativism. The third sections focuses on specific philosophical issues in human rights, including cultural relativity, economic rights, women’s rights, group, indigenous, and minority rights, security, and sovereignty and humanitarian intervention. And a final section on critiques of human rights has separate chapters on postmodernism, anti-foundationalism, and human rights discourse and practice. (shrink)
     
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  12.  96
    On the Philosophy and Legal Theory of Human Rights in Light of Quantum Holism.Amar Dhall - 2009 - World Futures 66 (1):1 – 25.
    This article explores the traditional basis of modern human rights doctrines and exposes some of the systemic shortcomings. It then posits that a number of these problems are advanced via integrating some developments in the philosophy of science and substantive scientific research into legal philosophy. This article argues that supervening holism grounded in quantum mechanics provides an alternative basis to human rights by positing an ontological construct that is congruous with many of the wisdom (...)
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  13.  48
    An Analysis of the Philosophy of Universal Human Rights: Hobbes, Locke, and Ignatieff.Eric D. Smaw - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):39-58.
    This project is, in part, motivated by my contention that one cannot adequately answer the question regarding the proper justification for human rights until one has answered the metaphysical question regarding the fundamental nature of human rights and the ontological question regarding the proper status of human rights. I offer a sustained analysis of metaphysical, ontological, and justificatory questions regarding human rights with the purpose of illustrating the point that theories that fail (...)
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  14. Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson's Political Philosophy.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2013 - Stanford University Press.
    The work of Henri Bergson, the foremost French philosopher of the early twentieth century, is not usually explored for its political dimensions. Indeed, Bergson is best known for his writings on time, evolution, and creativity. This book concentrates instead on his political philosophy—and especially on his late masterpiece, _The Two Sources of Morality and Religion_—from which Alexandre Lefebvre develops an original approach to human rights. We tend to think of human rights as the urgent international (...)
     
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  15.  33
    The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy[REVIEW]Alana Maurushat - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  16.  31
    Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism.Costas Douzinas - 2007 - Routledge-Cavendish.
    Erudite and timely, this book is a key contribution to the renewal of radical theory and politics.
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  17.  2
    Review of the Book,The Philosophy of Human Rights, Edited by Alan Rosenbaum. [REVIEW]Clark Butler - unknown
    Chaim Perelman's article in this volume first set me on the path of human rights ethics. A professor of Rhetoric, he understood the construction of human rights to be the construction of a universal audience, or potential universal audience, for the exercise of freedom of expression.
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  18.  19
    Global Human Rights, Peace and Cultural Difference: Huntington and the Political Philosophy of International Relations.W. Kersting - 2002 - Kantian Review 6 (1):5-34.
    In 1989, the age of power political realism ended. The conditions were set to replace the prevailing Hobbesian model of peace by deterrence with the considerably more challenging Kantian model of peace by right. If, however, Huntington's paradigm of fighting civilizations were right, we would have to forget Kant and remember Hobbes. Sober rationality, healthy distrust, striving for power accumulation and all the other instruments from the realist's toolbox of political prudence are very well suited to facilitate political self-assertion in (...)
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  19.  4
    Philosophy of Human Rights : Theory and Practice by David Boersema.Victoria M. Breting-Garcia - forthcoming - Human Rights Review.
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  20. Breach of Human Rights in the Political Philosophy of Hannah Arendt.Fausto Brito - 2013 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 54 (127):177-196.
     
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  21. Human Rights and the Leap of Love.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):21-40.
    To commemorate the 75 th anniversary of Henri Bergson’s death I present what I believe is his most vital and lasting contribution to political philosophy: his conception of human rights. This article has two goals. The first is to present Bergson’s writings on human rights as clearly and simply as possible, so as to reach the wide audience it deserves. The second is to demonstrate his relevance for contemporary human rights scholarship. To do (...)
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  22. The Philosophy of Human Rights International Perspectives /Edited by Alan S. Rosenbaum. --. --.Alan S. Rosenbaum - 1980 - Greenwood Press, 1980.
     
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  23.  3
    The Philosophy of Human Rights.David Heise - 2008 - Essays in Philosophy 9 (2):8.
  24. Concepts, Communication, and the Relevance of Philosophy to Human Rights: A Response to Randall Peerenboom.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):320-324.
  25.  18
    Jennifer Caseldine-Bracht is a Ph. D. Student in the Department of Philosophy at Michigan State University. She is a Research Associate for the Institute of Human Rights at Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne. [REVIEW]G. K. D. Crozier & Maya J. Goldenberg - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1).
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  26. Sociology and the Philosophy of Human Rights.Raymond Aron - 1970 - In Howard Evans Kiefer & Milton Karl Munitz (eds.), Ethics and Social Justice. Albany, State University of New York Press. pp. 282--299.
  27. Human Rights and Human Diversity: An Essay in the Philosophy of Human Rights.Michael Lessnoff - 1988 - Philosophical Books 29 (3):173-175.
  28.  3
    A Review on Human Rights From the Perspective of Ethical and Political Philosophy. 김병욱 - 2009 - Journal of Ethics 1 (73):255-266.
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  29.  2
    Costas Douzinas, Human Rights and Empire. The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism.Wouter Werner - 2008 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):197-199.
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  30. Images of Fear in Political Philosophy and Fairy Tales: Linking Private Abuse to Political Violence in Human Rights Discourse.M. Calloni - 2016 - Journal of International Political Theory 12 (1):67-89.
  31.  89
    Powszechność praw człowieka. Zagadnienia filozoficznoprawne [Universality of Human Rights in the Light of their Ontic Foundations].Marek Piechowiak - 1996 - In Tadeusz Jasudowicz & Cezary Mik (eds.), O prawach człowieka. W podwójną rocznicę Paktów. Księga Pamiątkowa w hołdzie Profesor Annie Michalskiej. Dom Organizatora TNOiK. pp. 49-71.
    Idea powszechności legła u samych podstaw współczesnej ochrony praw człowieka i nadal jest często podkreślana w dyskursie typu praktycznego, na różnych płaszczyznach: politycznej, moralnej czy religijnej. Jednakże trudno o koncepcję praw człowieka pozwalającą pogodzić powszechność z właściwościami prawa, z postulatami respektu dla pluralizmu ugruntowanego tak w odmienności kulturowej, jak i wolności poszczególnych jednostek ludzkich. Wziąwszy pod uwagę, że powszechność jest fundamentalnym przy¬miotem praw człowieka, kłopoty z powszechnością są kłopotami ze zbudowaniem filozoficznej koncepcji praw człowieka w ogóle. Odrzucenie powszechności jest równoznaczne (...)
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  32.  4
    Allen Buchanan, The Heart of Human Rights. Reviewed By.Sandra Raponi - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (4):185-187.
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  33.  3
    Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson’s Political Philosophy.Alex Feldman - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 14 (3):e12-e15.
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    Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson|[Rsquo]|s Political Philosophy.Alex Feldman - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 14 (3):e12.
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  35.  22
    Human Dignity and Human Rights in the Philosophy of Absolute Idealism.Laurence Rosan - 1971 - World Futures 9 (1):99-105.
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  36.  6
    Ph. D. In Philosophy, Lecturer in the Philosophical Faculty of the Novosibirsk State University, Director of the Non-Governmental Library for Human Rights and the Situation of Women (Resursnyj Centr Gumanitarnogo Obrazovanija), Author of Articles About Problems of Gender Relations. [REVIEW]Borin Dubin - 2003 - Studies in East European Thought 55:81-83.
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  37.  2
    Book Review: Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson’s Political Philosophy, by Alexandre Lefebvre. [REVIEW]Alexandre Lefebvre & Samuel Moyn - 2015 - Political Theory 43 (3):416-420.
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  38.  2
    No Fear of Foundations: Reflections on Human Rights in Contemporary Jewish Philosophy.Alan Mittleman - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (6):923-929.
  39. Deconstructing the Animal-Human Binary: Recent Work in Animal Studies: Review of Elephant Slaves and Pampered Parrots: Exotic Animals in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Louise E. Robbins, Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Galen to Animal Rights by Anita Guerrini, Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture, Edited by Mary Sanders Pollock and Catherine Rainwater, Renaissance Beasts: Of Animals, Humans, and Other Wonderful Creatures, Edited by Erica Fudge, Romanticism and Animal Rights by David Perkins, Savages and Beasts: The Birth of the Modern Zoo by Nigel Rothfels, and Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, Edited by Cary Wolfe. [REVIEW]Frank Palmeri - 2006 - Clio 36:407-420.
     
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  40.  7
    Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners.Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from (...)
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  41.  17
    Philosophers, Activists, and Radicals: A Story of Human Rights and Other Scandals. [REVIEW]Joseph Hoover & Marta Iñiguez De Heredia - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (2):191-220.
    Paradoxically, the political success of human rights is often taken to be its philosophical failing. From US interventions to International NGOs to indigenous movements, human rights have found a place in diverse political spaces, while being applied to disparate goals and expressed in a range of practices. This heteronomy is vital to the global appeal of human rights, but for traditional moral and political philosophy it is something of a scandal. This paper is (...)
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  42.  20
    A Critique of the Universalisability of Critical Human Rights Theory: The Displacement of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW]Mark F. N. Franke - 2013 - Human Rights Review 14 (4):367-385.
    While the critically oriented writings of Immanuel Kant remain the key theoretical grounds from which universalists challenge reduction of international rights law and protection to the practical particularities of sovereign states, Kant’s theory can be read as also a crucial argument for a human rights regime ordered around sovereign states and citizens. Consequently, universalists may be tempted to push Kant’s thinking to greater critical examination of ‘the human’ and its properties. However, such a move to more (...)
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  43.  8
    Humanité: John Humphrey's Alternative Account of Human Rights.Clinton Timothy Curle - 2007 - University of Toronto Press.
    Curle concludes that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, understood in a Bergsonian context, provides us with a way to affirm in the modern context that ...
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  44. The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance.John Mahoney - 2007 - Blackwell.
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights in (...)
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  45.  2
    Guest Editor's Introduction to Book Symposium on The Heart of Human Rights, by Allen Buchanan.Lister Matthew - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 2017.
    For many years now Allen Buchanan has been one of the most important theorists working on the philosophy of human rights, producing a large number of papers and two books significantly devoted to the topic. In the work under consideration in this symposium, Buchanan breaks new ground by examining what he claims to be the “heart” of international human rights practice – the international legal human rights (“ILHR”) system, subjecting it to moral and (...)
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  46. A Better, Dual Theory of Human Rights.Marcus Arvan - 2014 - Philosophical Forum 45 (1):17-47.
    Human rights theory and practice have long been stuck in a rut. Although disagreement is the norm in philosophy and social-political practice, the sheer depth and breadth of disagreement about human rights is truly unusual. Human rights theorists and practitioners disagree – wildly in many cases – over just about every issue: what human rights are, what they are for, how many of them there are, how they are justified, what (...) interests or capacities they are supposed to protect, what they require of persons and institutions, etc. Disagreement about human rights is so profound, in fact, that several prominent theorists have remarked that the very concept of a “human right” appears nearly criterionless. In my 2012 article, “Reconceptualizing Human Rights”, I diagnosed the root cause of these problems. Theorists and practitioners have falsely supposed that the concept of “human right” picks out a single, unified class of moral entitlements. However, the concept actually refers to two fundamentally different types of moral entitlements: (A) international human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive international protections, and (B) domestic human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive domestic protections. Accordingly, I argue, an adequate “theory of human rights” must be a dual theory. The present paper provides the first such theory. First, I show that almost every justificatory ground given for “human rights” in the literature – such as the notion of a “minimally decent human life”, “urgent human interests”, and “human needs” – faces at least one of two fatal problems. Second, I show that after some revisions, James Griffin’s conception of “personhood” provides a compelling justificatory ground for international human rights. Third, I show that the account entails that there are very few international human rights – far fewer than existing human rights theories and practices suggest. Fourth, I show that there are reasons to find my very short list of international human rights compelling: “human rights justifications” for coercive international and foreign policy actions over the past several decades have consistently overstepped what can be morally justified, and my account reveals precisely how existing human rights theories and practices have failed to adequately grapple with these moral hazards. Finally, I outline an account of domestic human rights which fits well with many existing human rights beliefs and practices, vindicating those beliefs and practices, but only at a domestic level. (shrink)
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  47. The Idea of Human Rights Four Inquiries.Michael J. Perry - 1998
    Inspired by a 1988 trip to El Salvador, Michael J. Perry's new book is a personal and scholarly exploration of the idea of human rights. Perry is one of our nation's leading authorities on the relation of morality, including religious morality, to politics and law. He seeks, in this book, to disentangle the complex idea of human rights by way of four probing and interrelated essays. * The initial essay, which is animated by Perry's skepticism about (...)
     
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  48.  4
    Victims' Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Victim's Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights takes on a set of questions suggested by the worldwide persistence of human rights abuse and the prevalence of victims' stories in human rights campaigns, truth commissions, and international criminal tribunals: What conceptions of victims are presumed in contemporary human rights discourse? How do conventional narrative templates fail victims of human rights abuse and resist raising novel human rights issues? What (...)
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  49.  1
    Examining Islam and Human Rights From the Perspective of Sufism.Fait A. Muedini - 2010 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 7 (1).
    This paper argues that within the Islamic mystical tradition of Sufism lies an important perspective for approaching human rights. Sufism, while usually perceived as only dealing with spiritual matters, actually expresses a distinct message of service to mankind, and thus should be examined within the discussion of Islam and human rights. Along with Sufism's emphasis on service, the Sufi message of unity with God, and specifically the message of recognizing the existence of God in all creatures (...)
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  50.  15
    Patočka's Conception of the Subject of Human Rights.James R. Mensch - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (1-2):1-10.
    Jan Patočka appears as a paradoxical figure. A champion of human rights, he often presents his philosophy in quite traditional terms. He speaks of the “soul,” its “care,” and of “living in truth.” Yet, in his proposal for an “asubjective” phenomenology, he undermines the traditional notion of the self that has such rights. The question that thus confronts a reader of Patočka is how to reconcile the Patočka who was a spokesman of the Charter 77 movement (...)
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