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  1.  9
    The Gift of the Nile: Hellenizing Egypt From Aeschylus to Alexander.Richard Hunter & Phiroze Vasunia - 2002 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (4):887.
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  2.  12
    (C.) Dougherty and (L.) Kurke Eds. The Cultures Within Ancient Greek Culture. Contact, Conflict, Collaboration. Cambridge UP, 2003. Pp. Xx + 289, Illus. £50/$70. 0521815665.(J.) Siapkas Heterological Ethnicity. Conceptualizing Identities in Ancient Greece. (Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Boreas: Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations, 27). Uppsala, 2003. Pp. X + 333, 1 Table, 1 Map. Sw. Kr. 230. 9155458238. [REVIEW]Phiroze Vasunia - 2005 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:178-180.
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    Homer's Legacy (B.) Graziosi (E.) Greenwood Homer in the Twentieth Century. Between World Literature and the Western Canon. Pp. Xiv + 322, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £55. ISBN: 978-0-19-929826-. [REVIEW]Phiroze Vasunia - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):614-.
  4.  2
    The Cultures Within Ancient Greek Culture. Contact, Conflict, Collaboration/Heterological Ethinicity. Conceptualizing Identities in Ancient Greece.Phiroze Vasunia - 2005 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:178-180.
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    Virgil and the British Empire, 1760–1880.Phiroze Vasunia - 2009 - In Duncan Kelly (ed.), Lineages of Empire: The Historical Roots of British Imperial Thought. pp. 83-116.
    This chapter reflects on the readings and uses of Virgil in British imperial contexts during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The British interest in Virgil heightened during the middle of the eighteenth century, when Britain was establishing its Second Empire. In the age of Elizabeth I and Shakespeare, Virgil was often deployed by writers in different imperial situations. Writers such as Edward Gibbon turned to Virgil not because of a desire to promote monarchical imperialism but with the aim of evaluating (...)
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