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  1.  6
    Ethics Across the Curriculum—Pedagogical Perspectives.Elaine E. Englehardt, Michael S. Pritchard, Robert Baker, Michael D. Burroughs, José A. Cruz-Cruz, Randall Curren, Michael Davis, Aine Donovan, Deni Elliott, Karin D. Ellison, Challie Facemire, William J. Frey, Joseph R. Herkert, Karlana June, Robert F. Ladenson, Christopher Meyers, Glen Miller, Deborah S. Mower, Lisa H. Newton, David T. Ozar, Alan A. Preti, Wade L. Robison, Brian Schrag, Alan Tomhave, Phyllis Vandenberg, Mark Vopat, Sandy Woodson, Daniel E. Wueste & Qin Zhu - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    Late in 1990, the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at Illinois Institute of Technology (lIT) received a grant of more than $200,000 from the National Science Foundation to try a campus-wide approach to integrating professional ethics into its technical curriculum.! Enough has now been accomplished to draw some tentative conclusions. I am the grant's principal investigator. In this paper, I shall describe what we at lIT did, what we learned, and what others, especially philosophers, can learn (...)
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  2. Developing Moral Sensitivity.Deborah Mower, Wade L. Robison & Phyllis Vandenberg (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Moral sensitivity affects whether and how we see others, note moral concerns, respond with delicacy, and navigate complex social interactions. Scholars from a variety of fields explore the concept of moral sensitivity and how it develops, beginning with a natural moral capacity for sensitivity towards others that is shaped in a variety of ways through relationships, forms of teaching, and social institutions. Each of these influences alters the capacity as well as one’s responses in complex ways. The concept of moral (...)
     
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  3.  24
    A Humean Look at Feminist Ethics.Phyllis Vandenberg - 2013 - The European Legacy (5):619-627.
    Hume would have supported feminist scholarship, specifically in the area of ethical theory, primarily because the feminist notion that we learn through relationships and conversation with others is exactly what he describes as the best way to develop our moral sentiments and come to know ourselves and our world. Feminist conceptions of justice and care, the complex distinction between social construction and the development of what we understand ourselves to be in relation to others, are themes feminists have in common (...)
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  4.  6
    Civility in Politics and Education.Phyllis Vandenberg - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (4):512-514.
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  5. Hutcheson, Francis.Phyllis Vandenberg & Abigail DeHart - 2013 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Francis Hutcheson (1694-1745) Francis Hutcheson was an eighteenth-century Scottish philosopher whose meticulous writings and activities influenced life in Scotland, Great Britain, Europe, and even the newly formed North American colonies. For historians and political scientists, the emphasis has been on his theories of liberalism and political rights; for philosophers and psychologists, Hutcheson’s importance comes from […].
     
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  6. Mandeville, Bernard.Phyllis Vandenberg & Abigail DeHart - 2013 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) Bernard Mandeville is primarily remembered for his impact on discussions of morality and economic theory in the early eighteenth century. His most noteworthy and notorious work is The Fable of the Bees, which triggered immense public criticism at the time. He had a particular influence on philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, most […].
     
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  7.  14
    Relationships and the Spectator Perspectives in Hutcheson, Hume, and Smith.Phyllis Vandenberg - 2008 - Cultura 5 (1):142-156.
    Looking closely at Adam Smith’s account of the spectator perspective – along with the compatible spectator accounts in Hutcheson and Hume – is especiallyhelpful to understanding one of the main themes of the Scottish Enlightenment. The Scots in response to Hobbesian egoism described a morality that does not need to overcome a human nature that pits individuals against each other. Rather each of the three Scots describes the empirical formation of our humanity and our moral sentiments in the context of (...)
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