Results for 'Physiology'

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  1. Principles of Animal Design the Optimization and Symmorphosis Debate.Ewald R. Webel, C. Richard Taylor, Liana Bolis & International Conference on Comparative Physiology - 1998
     
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  2.  61
    Descartes' Physiology and its Relation to His Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 1992 - In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 335--370.
    Descartes understood the subject matter of physics (or natural philosophy) to encompass the whole of nature, including living things. It therefore comprised not only nonvital phenomena, including those we would now denominate as physical, chemical, minerological, magnetic, and atmospheric; it also extended to the world of plants and animals, including the human animal (with the exception of those aspects of the human mind that Descartes assigned to solely to thinking substance: pure intellect and will). Descartes wrote extensively on physiology (...)
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  3.  20
    Before There Were Standards: The Role of Test Animals in the Production of Empirical Generality in Physiology[REVIEW]Cheryl A. Logan - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):329-363.
    After 1900, the selective breeding of a few standard animals for research in the life sciences changed the way science was done. Among the pervasive changes was a transformation in scientists' assumptions about relationship between diversity and generality. Examination of the contents of two prominent physiology journals between 1885 and 1900, reveals that scientists used a diverse array of organisms in empirical research. Experimental physiologists gave many reasons for the choice of test animals, some practical and others truly comparative. (...)
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  4. The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action.A. Berthoz - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  5.  17
    Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology[REVIEW]Henning Schmidgen - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed (...)
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  6.  20
    Custom and Habit in Physiology and the Science of Human Nature in the British Enlightenment.John P. Wright - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):183-207.
    In this paper I show how what came to be known as “the double law of habit,” first formulated by Joseph Butler in a discussion of moral psychology in 1736, was taken up and developed by medical physiologists William Porterfield, Robert Whytt, and William Cullen as they disputed fundamental questions regarding the influence of the mind on the body, the possibility of unconscious mental processes, and the nature and extent of voluntary action. The paper shows, on a particular topic, the (...)
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  7. Unfair to Physiology.Eugen Fischer - 2001 - Acta Analytica 16 (26):135-155.
    The paper seeks to refute the idea that physiology can explain at best an organism’s behaviour, outward and inner, but not the conscious experiences that accompany that behaviour. To do so, the paper clarifies the idea by confrontation with an actual example of psychophysical explanation of perceptual experience. This reveals that the idea relies on a prejudice about physiological practice. Then the paper explores some peculiar ways in which this prejudice may survive its refutation. This is to bring out (...)
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  8.  9
    The Evolutionary Stages of Plant Physiology and a Plea for Transdisciplinarity.Jorge Marques da Silva & Elena Casetta - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (2):205-215.
    In this paper, the need of increasing transdisciplinarity research is advocated. After having set out some peculiarity of transdisciplinarity compared with related concepts such as multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, four evolutionary stages of scientific disciplines, based on a model recently proposed are presented. This model is then applied to the case of Plant Physiology in order to attempt an evaluation of the potential for transdisciplinary engagement of the discipline, and each of the four stages of the discipline is evaluated. In (...)
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  9. The Physiology of the Sense Organs and Early Neo-Kantian Conceptions of Objectivity: Helmholtz, Lange, Liebmann.Scott Edgar - 2015 - In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: Approaches to Historical Epistemology. Boston Studies in Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.
    The physiologist Johannes Müller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies had a decisive influence on neo-Kantian conceptions of the objectivity of knowledge in the 1850s - 1870s. In the first half of the nineteenth century, Müller amassed a body of experimental evidence to support his doctrine, according to which the character of our sensations is determined by the structures of our own sensory nerves, and not by the external objects that cause the sensations. Neo-Kantians such as Hermann von Helmholtz, F.A. Lange, (...)
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  10.  22
    Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise, Baltimore: John Hopkins, 2002. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2005 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 14 (1):70-71.
  11.  28
    The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account.Tamás Demeter - 2012 - In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill.
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active contribution (...)
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  12.  11
    Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations.Eduard Glas - 1979 - Delft University Press.
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  13.  38
    Philosophy and Brain Physiology.Charles A. Campbell - 1953 - Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.
  14.  13
    Studies on the Physiology of Sleep Changes in Irritability to Auditory Stimuli During Sleep.F. J. Mullin, N. Kleitman & N. R. Cooperman - 1937 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):88.
  15.  23
    Perception and Physiology.P. L. McKee - 1971 - Mind 80 (October):594-596.
  16. The Growth of Scientific Physiology Physiological Method and the Mechanist-Vitalist Controversy, Illustrated by the Problems of Respiration and Animal Heat.June Goodfield & Nuffield Foundation - 1960 - Hutchinson of London.
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  17. The Growth of Scientific Physiology Physiological Method and the Mechanist-Vitalist Controversy, Illustrated by the Problems of Respiration and Animal Heat.G. J. Goodfield - 1975
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  18. Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology.Frank Stahnisch - 2012 - Project Verlag.
     
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  19. “Man-Machines and Embodiment: From Cartesian Physiology to Claude Bernard’s ‘Living Machine’”.Charles T. Wolfe & Philippe Huneman - forthcoming - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), Embodiment, Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford University Press.
    A common and enduring early modern intuition is that materialists reduce organisms in general and human beings in particular to automata. Wasn’t a famous book of the time entitled L’Homme-Machine? In fact, the machine is employed as an analogy, and there was a specifically materialist form of embodiment, in which the body is not reduced to an inanimate machine, but is conceived as an affective, flesh-and-blood entity. We discuss how mechanist and vitalist models of organism exist in a more complementary (...)
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  20.  32
    Descartes, Corpuscles and Reductionism: Mechanism and Systems in Descartes' Physiology.Barnaby R. Hutchins - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (261):669-689.
    I argue that Descartes explains physiology in terms of whole systems, and not in terms of the size, shape and motion of tiny corpuscles (corpuscular mechanics). It is a standard, entrenched view that Descartes’ proper means of explanation in the natural world is through strict reduction to corpuscular mechanics. This view is bolstered by a handful of corpuscular–mechanical explanations in Descartes’ physics, which have been taken to be representative of his treatment of all natural phenomena. However, Descartes’ explanations of (...)
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  21.  97
    The Pulse of Modernism: Experimental Physiology and Aesthetic Avant-Gardes Circa 1900.Robert Michael Brain - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):393-417.
    When discussing the changing sense of reality around 1900 in the cultural arts the lexicon of early modernism reigns supreme. This essay contends that a critical condition for the possibility of many of the turn of the century modernist movements in the arts can be found in exchange of instruments, concepts, and media of representation between the sciences and the arts. One route of interaction came through physiological aesthetics, the attempt to ‘elucidate physiologically the nature of our Aesthetic feelings’ and (...)
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  22.  14
    Vital Instability: Life and Free Will in Physics and Physiology, 1860–1880.Marij van Strien - 2015 - Annals of Science 72 (3):381-400.
    During the period 1860-1880, a number of physicists and mathematicians, including Maxwell, Stewart, Cournot and Boussinesq, used theories formulated in terms of physics to argue that the mind, the soul or a vital principle could have an impact on the body. This paper shows that what was primarily at stake for these authors was a concern about the irreducibility of life and the mind to physics, and that their theories can be regarded primarily as reactions to the law of conservation (...)
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  23. “The ‘Physiology of the Understanding’ and the ‘Mechanics of the Soul’: Reflections on Some Phantom Philosophical Projects”.Charles T. Wolfe - 2016 - Quaestio 16:3-25.
    In reflecting on the relation between early empiricist conceptions of the mind and more experimentally motivated materialist philosophies of mind in the mid-eighteenth century, I suggest that we take seriously the existence of what I shall call ‘phantom philosophical projects’. A canonical empiricist like Locke goes out of his way to state that their project to investigate and articulate the ‘logic of ideas’ is not a scientific project: “I shall not at present meddle with the Physical consideration of the Mind” (...)
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  24.  4
    Spinoza’s Missing Physiology.Raphaële Andrault - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (2):214-243.
    In his Handbook of Physiology, the nineteenth-century physician Johannes Müller cited the third part of the Ethics entirely: no one, he held, had ever explained "static connections among passions" better than Spinoza. Earlier, Goethe referred to the famous physiologist Boerhaave as a "master of clinical medicine and the last disciple of Spinoza". And more than a century later, in his book Looking for Spinoza, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio considered that Spinoza's Ethics offered the proper philosophical framework for understanding the (...)
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  25.  27
    Springs, Nitre, and Conatus. The Role of the Heart in Hobbes's Physiology and Animal Locomotion.Rodolfo Garau - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):231-256.
    This paper focuses on an understudied aspect of Hobbes's natural philosophy: his approach to the domain of life. I concentrate on the role assigned by Hobbes to the heart, which occupies a central role in both his account of human physiology and of the origin of animal locomotion. With this, I have three goals in mind. First, I aim to offer a cross-section of Hobbes's effort to provide a mechanistic picture of human life. Second, I aim to contextualize Hobbes's (...)
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  26.  37
    The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - I: Old Physiology-the Pen.A. Cunningham - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):631-665.
    It is argued that the disciplinary identity of anatomy and physiology before 1800 are unknown to us due to the subsequent creation, success and historiographical dominance of a different discipline-experimental physiology. The first of these two papers deals with the identity of physiology from its revival in the 1530s, and demonstrates that it was a theoretical, not an experimental, discipline, achieved with the mind and the pen, not the hand and the knife. The physiological work of Jean (...)
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  27.  9
    Does Descartes Have a Principle of Life?: Hierarchy and Interdependence in Descartes's Physiology.Barnaby R. Hutchins - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (6):744-769.
    At various points in his work on physiology and medicine, Descartes refers to a “principle of life.” The exact term changes—sometimes, it is the “principle of movement and life”, sometimes the “principle underlying all [the] functions” of the body —but the message seems consistent: the phenomena of living bodies are the product of a single, underlying principle. That principle is generally taken to be cardiac heat.1 The literature has, quite reasonably, taken this message at face value. Thus, Shapiro: “Descartes (...)
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  28.  8
    Alliances in Human Biology: The Harvard Committee on Industrial Physiology, 1929–1939.Jason Oakes - 2015 - Journal of the History of Biology 48 (3):365-390.
    In 1929 the newly-reorganized Rockefeller Foundation funded the work of a cross-disciplinary group at Harvard University called the Committee on Industrial Physiology. The committee’s research and pedagogical work was oriented towards different things for different members of the alliance. The CIP program included a research component in the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Elton May’s interpretation of the Hawthorne Studies; a pedagogical aspect as part of Wallace Donham’s curriculum for Harvard Business School; and Lawrence Henderson’s work with the Harvard Pareto (...)
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  29.  52
    Nietzsche as a Reader of Wilhelm Roux, or the Physiology of History.Lukas Soderstrom - 2009 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 13 (2):55-67.
    This paper explores one of the main sources of Nietzsche’s knowledge of physiology and considers its relevance for the philosophical study of history. Beginning in 1881, Nietzsche read Der Kampf der Theile im Organismus by Wilhelm Roux, which exposed him to a dysteleological account of organic development emphasising the excitative, assimilative and auto-regulative processes of the body. These processes mediate the effects of natural selection. His reading contributed to a physiological understanding of history that borrowed Roux’s description of physiological (...)
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  30.  12
    Assimiliating an Associative Trait: From Eco-Physiology to Epigenetics.Andres Kurismaa - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):199-229.
    The possible evolutionary significance of epigenetic memory and codes is a key problem for extended evolutionary synthesis and biosemiotics. In this paper, some less known original works are reviewed which highlight theoretical parallels between current evolutionary epigenetics, on the one hand, and its predecessors in the eco-physiology of higher nervous activity, on the other. Recently, these areas have begun to converge, with first evidence now indicating the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of conditional associations in the mammalian nervous system, (...)
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  31.  80
    Controlling the Passions: Passion, Memory, and the Moral Physiology of Self in Seventeenth-Century Neurophilosophy.John Sutton - 1998 - In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century. Routledge. pp. 115-146.
    Some natural philosophers in the 17th century believed that they could control their own innards, specifically the animal spirits coursing incessantly through brain and nerves, in order to discipline or harness passion, cognition and action under rational guidance. This chapter addresses the mechanisms thought necessary after Eden for controlling the physiology of passion. The tragedy of human embedding in the body, with its cognitive and moral limitations, was paired with a sense of our confinement in sequential time. I use (...)
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  32.  30
    The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - II: Old Anatomy-the Sword.A. Cunningham - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):51-76.
    Following the exploration of the disciplinary identity of physiology before 1800 in the previous paper of this pair, the present paper seeks to recover the complementary identity of the discipline of anatomy before 1800. The manual, artisanal character of anatomy is explored via some of its practitioners, with special attention being given to William Harvey and Albrecht von Haller. Attention is particularly drawn to the important role of experiment in anatomical research and practice-which has been misread by historians as (...)
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  33.  12
    Centers and Peripheries: The Development of British Physiology, 1870-1914. [REVIEW]Stella V. F. Butler - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (3):473 - 500.
    By 1910 the Cambridge University physiology department had become the kernel of British physiology. Between 1909 and 1914 an astonishing number of young and talented scientists passed through the laboratory. The University College department was also a stimulating place of study under the dynamic leadership of Ernest Starling.I have argued that the reasons for this metropolitan axis within British physiology lie with the social structure of late-Victorian and Edwardian higher education. Cambridge, Oxford, and University College London were (...)
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  34.  7
    Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception in Late-19th-Century Physiology.Henning Schmidgen - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477-513.
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, such as the (...)
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  35.  52
    The Physiology of Collective Consciousness.Mark Germine - 1997 - World Futures 48 (1):57-104.
    (1997). The physiology of collective consciousness. World Futures: Vol. 48, The Concept of Collective Consiousness: Research Perspectives, pp. 57-104.
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  36.  6
    Drawing the Life-Blood of Physiology: Vivisection and the Physiologists' Dilemma, 1870–1900.Stewart Richards - 1986 - Annals of Science 43 (1):27-56.
    Within thirty years from 1870, English physiology was transformed from a subsidiary branch of anatomy to an experimental school of international reputation. An inevitable consequence of this metamorphosis was disclosure of the intrinsic nature of the new discipline, in particular by Burdon Sanderson's Handbook for the Physiological Laboratory . By transmitting Continental methods to England, the Handbook gave direction to its awakening science, and at the same time represented a provocative target for attacks by the antivivisectionists. In uncertain defence (...)
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  37.  35
    Canguilhem's "Comparative Physiology".John Protevi - 2015 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 19 (2):57-71.
    This paper brings Georges Canguilhem and Gilles Deleuze together with the contemporary biologist Mary Jane West-Eberhard. I examine the concepts of adaptation and adaptivity in Canguilhem’s The Normal and the Pathological in light of West-Eberhard’s notion of “developmental plasticity,” which is, I claim, adaptivity in the developmental register. In turn, I interpret Canguilhem’s notion of “comparative physiology” and West- Eberhard’s notion of an “eco-devo-evo” approach to biology in terms of Deleuze’s notion of multiplicity.
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  38.  57
    F.J.J. Buytendijk's Concept of an Anthropological Physiology.Wim J. M. Dekkers - 1995 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
    In his concept of an anthropological physiology, F.J.J. Buytendijk has tried to lay down the theoretical and scientific foundations for an anthropologically-oriented medicine. The aim of anthropological physiology is to demonstrate, empirically, what being specifically human is in the most elementary physiological functions. This article contains a sketch of Buytendijk''s life and work, an overview of his philosophical-anthropological presuppositions, an outline of his idea of an anthropological physiology and medicine, and a discussion of some episternological and methodological (...)
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  39. Rhythm in Physiology – Peripatetic School's Problems.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter NB : This text is a section of larger work on rhythm in Antiquity. Rhythm in Physiology – Peripatetic School's Problems In the Προβλήματα – Problems, which is an Aristotelian or more probably pseudo-Aristotelian collection of questions and answers gradually assembled by members of the peripatetic school, the concept of rhythm mutates again. The gap between the Aristotelian sophisticated analyses developed in Rhetoric and Poetics and the gross definitions given in - Médecine – Nouvel article.
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  40.  21
    Psychology and Physiology (Part 2).Henry J. Wirtenberger - 1927 - Modern Schoolman 4 (2):31-31.
    Up to date Scholasticism is quite proud of its close union with Science. That bond has been strengthened considerable of late by the Physiology course described and recommended in the present article. The Editor.
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  41.  41
    A Physiology of Encounters: Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Strange Alliances.Tom Sparrow - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):165-186.
    The body is central to the philosophies of Spinoza and Nietzsche. Both thinkers are concerned with the composition of the body, its potential relations with other bodies, and the modifications which a body can undergo. Gilles Deleuze has contributed significantly to the relatively sparse literature which draws out the affinities between Spinoza and Nietzsche. Deleuze’s reconceptualization of the field of ethology enables us to bring Spinoza and Nietzsche together as ethologists of the body and to elaborate their common, physiological perspective (...)
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  42.  22
    Political Physiology in High School: Columbine and After.John Protevi - unknown
    In this paper I investigate the mechanics of killing, brining together neuroscience, military history, and the work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari. Investigating the Columbine killers and the way they negotiate with the intensity of the act of killing allows me to construct a concept of “political physiology,” defined as “interlocking intensive processes that articulate the patterns, thresholds, and triggers of emergent bodies, forming assemblages linking the social and the somatic, with sometimes the subjective as (...)
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  43.  26
    Leibniz on Physiology and Organic Bodies.François Duchesneau - 2013 - The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz.
    In Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz's time, micro-mechanism seemed to dominate, though not exclusively, the more innovative trend in physiology, and microscopic anatomy determined the representation of living beings. The basic postulate was that human understanding could rely on microscopic observation and account for microstructures by framing mechanical models: along that trend, hope was to attain the real causes of physiological phenomena. In his natural philosophy, Leibniz grants living beings a prominent place. His metaphysics contains arguments and notions that build on (...)
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  44.  18
    Circling the Archimedean Viewpoint: Observations of Physiology in Nietzsche and Luhmann.Edgar Landgraf - 2014 - Substance 43 (3):88-106.
    The question of how our conception of the world could differ so widely from the disclosed nature of the world will with perfect equanimity be relinquished to the physiology and history of the evolution of organisms and concepts.In an interview conducted by the Italian literary journal Alfabeta in April of 1987,1 Niklas Luhmann was asked if sociology, in particular its systems-theoretical variant, could replace the privileged position that art, religion, philosophy, and politics had lost, and provide an Archimedean point (...)
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  45.  11
    The Moral Physiology of Inequality: Response to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination Vs Non-Interference’.Stephen John - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):164-165.
    In this article, I respond to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities’. I first note a niggle about the paper’s assumption that lowering socio-economic inequalities will lower the social gradient in health. I then suggest two further ways in which neorepublicanism may relate to social epidemiology: in terms of ‘moral physiology’ and through analysing which inequalities are unjust.
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  46.  12
    Abstraction, Dissociation, and Mental Labor: Paul Szende’s Social Epistemology Between Physiology and Social Theory.Tamas Demeter - 2015 - Studies in East European Thought 67 (1-2):13-30.
    In this paper I focus on the Hungarian intellectual and politician Paul Szende’s sociologically oriented epistemology. I trace the influences of physiology, psychology, economy, evolutionary theory of his day on his sociological theory of abstractive knowledge, and discuss the close connection between physiological, social, and economic aspects in the early sociology of knowledge. My discussion continues with an examination of Szende’s differentiation between two economic effects within social epistemology: on the one hand the ‘economy of thought’ in the tradition (...)
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  47.  22
    Physiology, Hygiene and the Entry of Women to the Medical Profession in Edinburgh C. 1869-C. 1900.E. Thomson - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):105-126.
    Academic physiology, as it was taught by John Hughes Bennett during the 1870s, involved an understanding of the functions of the human body and the physical laws which governed those functions. This knowledge was perceived to be directly relevant and applicable to clinical practice in terms of maintaining bodily hygiene and human health. The first generation of medical women received their physiological education at Edinburgh University under Bennett, who emphasised the importance of physiology for women due to its (...)
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  48.  8
    Birth of the Allostatic Model: From Cannon’s Biocracy to Critical Physiology.Mathieu Arminjon - 2016 - Journal of the History of Biology 49 (2):397-423.
    Physiologists and historians are still debating what conceptually differentiates each of the three major modern theories of regulation: the constancy of the milieu inte´rieur, homeostasis and allostasis. Here I propose that these models incarnate two distinct regimes of politization of the life sciences.This perspective leads me to suggest that the historicization of physiological norms is intrinsic to the allostatic model, which thus divides it fundamentally from the two others. I analyze the allostatic model in the light of the Canguilhemian theory, (...)
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  49.  16
    The Interpretation of Physiology.Barbara E. Jones - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):955-956.
    Not at all self-evident, the so-called isomorphisms between the phenomenology and physiology of dreams have been interpreted by Hobson et al. in an arbitrary manner to state that dreams are stimulated by chaotic brainstem stimulation (an assumption also adopted by Vertes & Eastman). I argue that this stimulation is not chaotic at all; nor does it occur in the absence of control from the cerebral cortex, which contributes complexity to brainstem activity as well as meaningful information worth consolidating in (...)
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  50.  6
    “They Sweat for Science”: The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Self-Experimentation in American Exercise Physiology.Andi Johnson - 2015 - Journal of the History of Biology 48 (3):425-454.
    In many scientific fields, the practice of self-experimentation waned over the course of the twentieth century. For exercise physiologists working today, however, the practice of self-experimentation is alive and well. This paper considers the role of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and its scientific director, D. Bruce Dill, in legitimizing the practice of self-experimentation in exercise physiology. Descriptions of self-experimentation are drawn from papers published by members of the Harvard Fatigue Lab. Attention is paid to the ethical and practical justifications (...)
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