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  1.  85
    Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):17 - 66.
    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments on mice. (...)
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  2.  53
    Labor and the Human Relationship with Nature: The Naturalization of Politics in the Work of Thomas Henry Huxley, Herbert George Wells, and William Morris. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):249 - 284.
    Historically labor has been central to human interactions with the environment, yet environmentalists pay it scant attention. Indeed, they have been critical of those who foreground labor in their politics, socialists in particular. However, environmentalists have found the nineteenth-century socialist William Morris appealing despite the fact that he wrote extensively on labor. This paper considers the place of labor in the relationship between humanity and the natural world in the work of Morris and two of his contemporaries, the eminent scientist (...)
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  3.  1
    The Making of a Man of Science: Darwin’s Development in a Transformative Time.Piers J. Hale - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):368-370.
  4.  65
    Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley’s Water Babies. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwin’s cause and that of honesty in science for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsley’s interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsley’s consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwin’s account of the (...)
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  5.  24
    Peter J. Bowler. Darwin Deleted: Imagining a World Without Darwin. Ix + 318 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2013. $30. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2014 - Isis 105 (2):450-451.
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  6.  12
    Global Spencerism: The Communication and Appropriation of a British Evolutionist.Piers J. Hale - 2018 - Annals of Science 75 (2):156-159.
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  7.  4
    Michael Boulter. Bloomsbury Scientists: Science and Art in the Wake of Darwin. Xiii + 175 Pp., Figs., Notes, Bibl., Index. London: UCL Press, 2017. £35 ; £15 . ISBN 9781787350052. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2019 - Isis 110 (1):191-192.
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  8.  9
    Stuart Mccook, States of Nature: Science, Agriculture, and Environment in the Spanish Caribbean, 1760–1940. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002. Pp. XIV+201. Isbn 0-292-75257-1. £17.50. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (2):215-216.
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  9.  6
    Bernard Lightman; Bennett Zon . Evolution and Victorian Culture. Xvii + 320 Pp., Illus., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. £60. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2015 - Isis 106 (4):954-956.
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