12 found
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  1.  65
    Technical Functions: A Drawbridge Between the Intentional and Structural Natures of Technical Artefacts.Pieter E. Vermaas & Wybo Houkes - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):5-18.
    In this paper we present an action-theoretic account of artefact using and designing and describe our ICE-theory of function ascriptions to technical artefacts. By means of this account and theory we analyse the thesis of the dual nature of technical artefacts according to which descriptions of technical artefacts draw on structural and intentional conceptualisations. We show that the ascription of technical functions to technical artefacts can connect the intentional and structural parts of descriptions of artefacts, but also separate these parts. (...)
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  2.  16
    Driving in the Dark: Designing Autonomous Vehicles for Reducing Light Pollution.Taylor Stone, Filippo Santoni de Sio & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (1):387-403.
    This paper proposes that autonomous vehicles should be designed to reduce light pollution. In support of this specific proposal, a moral assessment of autonomous vehicles more comprehensive than the dilemmatic life-and-death questions of trolley problem-style situations is presented. The paper therefore consists of two interrelated arguments. The first is that autonomous vehicles are currently still a technology in development, and not one that has acquired its definitive shape, meaning the design of both the vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure is open-ended. (...)
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  3.  10
    The Fine-Grained Metaphysics of Artifactual and Biological Functional Kinds.Massimilian Carrara & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2009 - Synthese 169 (1):125-143.
    In this paper we consider the emerging position in metaphysics that artifact functions characterize real kinds of artifacts. We analyze how it can circumvent an objection by David Wiggins and then argue that this position, in comparison to expert judgments, amounts to an interesting fine-grained metaphysics: taking artifact functions as essences of artifacts leads to distinctions between principles of activity of artifacts that experts in technology have not yet made. We show, moreover, that our argument holds not only in the (...)
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  4.  37
    The Physical Connection: Engineering Function Ascriptions to Technical Artefacts and Their Components.Pieter E. Vermaas - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):62-75.
    In this paper I evaluate the ICE-theory of function ascriptions to technical artefacts as proposed by Houkes and Vermaas, 2004a and Houkes and Vermaas, 2004b. This account adds non-structural concepts to functional description of artefacts, which are typically not employed by engineers when they ascribe functions to artefacts. The aim of this paper is to analyse to what extent the ICE-theory can reproduce the engineering view that artefacts have their functions in virtue of their physicochemical structure. It is shown that (...)
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  5.  5
    Contemporary Engineering and the Metaphysics of Artefacts: Beyond the Artisan Model.Wybo Houkes & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2009 - The Monist 92 (3):403-419.
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  6.  36
    Dual-Nature and Collectivist Frameworks for Technical Artefacts: A Constructive Comparison.Wybo Houkes, Peter Kroes, Anthonie Meijers & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):198-205.
    This paper systematically compares two frameworks for analysing technical artefacts: the Dual-Nature approach, exemplified by the contributions to Kroes and Meijers , and the collectivist approach advocated by Schyfter , following Kusch . After describing the main tenets of both approaches, we show that there is significant overlap between them: both frameworks analyse the most typical cases of artefact use, albeit in different terms, but to largely the same extent. Then, we describe several kinds of cases for which the frameworks (...)
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  7.  38
    Designing for Trust: A Case of Value-Sensitive Design.Pieter E. Vermaas, Yao-Hua Tan, Jeroen van den Hoven, Brigitte Burgemeestre & Joris Hulstijn - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3):491-505.
    In this paper, we consider the meaning, roles, and uses of trust in the economic and public domain, focusing on the task of designing systems for trust in information technology. We analyze this task by means of a survey of what trust means in the economic and public domain, using the model proposed by Lewicki and Bunker, and using the emerging paradigm of value-sensitive design. We explore the difficulties developers face when designing information technology for trust and show how our (...)
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  8.  20
    Artefacts in Analytic Metaphysics: Introduction.Wybo Houkes & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2009 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 13 (2):74-81.
    In this paper we examine the possibilities of combining two central intuitions about artefacts: that they are functional objects, and that they are non-natural objects. We do so in four steps. First we argue that, contrary to common opinion, functions cannot be the cornerstone of a characterisation of artefacts. Our argument suggests an alternative view, which characterises artefacts as objects embedded in what we call use plans. Second, we show that this plan-centred successor of the function-focused view is at odds (...)
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  9.  11
    Two No-Go Theorems for Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics.Pieter E. Vermaas - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (3):403-431.
    Modal interpretations take quantum mechanics as a theory which assigns at all times definite values to magnitudes of quantum systems. In the case of single systems, modal interpretations manage to do so without falling prey to the Kochen and Specker no-go theorem, because they assign values only to a limited set of magnitudes. In this paper I present two further no-go theorems which prove that two modal interpretations become nevertheless problematic when applied to more than one system. The first theorem (...)
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  10.  9
    Editorial Statement.Joseph C. Pitt, Pieter E. Vermaas & Peter-Paul Verbeek - 2007 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 11 (1):1-1.
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  11.  8
    Produced to Use: Combining Two Key Intuitions on the Nature of Artefacts.Wybo Houkes & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2009 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 13 (2):123-136.
    In this paper we examine the possibilities of combining two central intuitions about artefacts: that they are functional objects, and that they are non-natural objects. We do so in four steps. First we argue that, contrary to common opinion, functions cannot be the cornerstone of a characterisation of artefacts. Our argument suggests an alternative view, which characterises artefacts as objects embedded in what we call use plans. Second, we show that this plan-centred successor of the function-focused view is at odds (...)
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  12.  7
    Philosophy of Engineering and Technology: A New Book Series.Pieter E. Vermaas - 2010 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 14 (1):55-59.
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