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Pim Haselager [24]Pim F. G. Haselager [1]
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Pim Haselager
Radboud University Nijmegen
  1. Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence.Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.
    Deep brain stimulation is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment refractory (...)
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  2. Designing Virtuous Sex Robots.Anco Peeters & Pim Haselager - 2019 - International Journal of Social Robotics:1-12.
    We propose that virtue ethics can be used to address ethical issues central to discussions about sex robots. In particular, we argue virtue ethics is well equipped to focus on the implications of sex robots for human moral character. Our evaluation develops in four steps. First, we present virtue ethics as a suitable framework for the evaluation of human–robot relationships. Second, we show the advantages of our virtue ethical account of sex robots by comparing it to current instrumentalist approaches, showing (...)
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  3. Why We May Not Find Intentions in the Brain.Sebo Uithol, Daniel C. Burnston & Pim Haselager - 2014 - Neuropsychologia 56 (5):129-139.
    Intentions are commonly conceived of as discrete mental states that are the direct cause of actions. In the last several decades, neuroscientists have taken up the project of finding the neural implementation of intentions, and a number of areas have been posited as implementing these states. We argue, however, that the processes underlying action initiation and control are considerably more dynamic and context sensitive than the concept of intention can allow for. Therefore, adopting the notion of ‘intention’ in neuroscientific explanations (...)
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  4.  99
    Hacking the Brain: Brain–Computer Interfacing Technology and the Ethics of Neurosecurity.Marcello Ienca & Pim Haselager - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (2):117-129.
    Brain–computer interfacing technologies are used as assistive technologies for patients as well as healthy subjects to control devices solely by brain activity. Yet the risks associated with the misuse of these technologies remain largely unexplored. Recent findings have shown that BCIs are potentially vulnerable to cybercriminality. This opens the prospect of “neurocrime”: extending the range of computer-crime to neural devices. This paper explores a type of neurocrime that we call brain-hacking as it aims at the illicit access to and manipulation (...)
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  5. Did I Do That? Brain–Computer Interfacing and the Sense of Agency.Pim Haselager - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (3):405-418.
    Brain–computer interfacing (BCI) aims at directly capturing brain activity in order to enable a user to drive an application such as a wheelchair without using peripheral neural or motor systems. Low signal to noise ratio’s, low processing speed, and huge intra- and inter-subject variability currently call for the addition of intelligence to the applications, in order to compensate for errors in the production and/or the decoding of brain signals. However, the combination of minds and machines through BCI’s and intelligent devices (...)
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  6.  13
    A Reason To Be Free: Operationalizing ‘Free Action’.Giulio Mecacci & Pim Haselager - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):327-334.
    Recent Libet-style experiments are of limited relevance to the debate about free action and free will, and should be understood as investigations of arbitrary actions or guesses. In Libet-style experiments, the concept of 'free action' is commonly taken to refer to a 'self-initiated voluntary act', where the self prompts an action without being prompted. However, this idea is based on the problematic assumption that the conscious self needs to be free from every constraint in order to be actually free. We (...)
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  7.  67
    The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders' Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing. [REVIEW]Femke Nijboer, Jens Clausen, Brendan Z. Allison & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):541-578.
    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at the 4th International BCI conference, which took place in May–June 2010 in Asilomar, California. We assessed respondents’ opinions about a number of topics. First, we investigated preferences for terminology and definitions relating to BCIs. Second, we assessed respondents’ expectations on the marketability of different BCI (...)
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  8. If You’Re Smart, We’Ll Make You Smarter: Applying the Reasoning Behind the Development of Honours Programmes to Other Forms of Cognitive Enhancement.Bas Olthof, Anco Peeters, Kimberly Schelle & Pim Haselager - 2013 - In Federica Lucivero & Anton Vedder (eds.), Beyond Therapy v. Enhancement? Multidisciplinary analyses of a heated debate. Pisa University Press. pp. 117-142.
    Students using Ritalin in preparation for their exams is a hotly debated issue, while meditating or drinking coffee before those same exams is deemed uncontroversial. However, taking Ritalin, meditating and drinking coffee or even education in general, can all be considered forms of cognitive enhancement. Although social acceptance might change in the future, it is interesting to examine the current reasons that are used to distinguish cases deemed problematic or unproblematic. Why are some forms of cognitive enhancement considered problematic, while (...)
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  9.  19
    Identifying Criteria for the Evaluation of the Implications of Brain Reading for Mental Privacy.Giulio Mecacci & Pim Haselager - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (2):443-461.
    Contemporary brain reading technologies promise to provide the possibility to decode and interpret mental states and processes. Brain reading could have numerous societally relevant implications. In particular, the private character of mind might be affected, generating ethical and legal concerns. This paper aims at equipping ethicists and policy makers with conceptual tools to support an evaluation of the potential applicability and the implications of current and near future brain reading technology. We start with clarifying the concepts of mind reading and (...)
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  10. Representationalism Vs. Anti-Representationalism: A Debate for the Sake of Appearance.Pim Haselager, Andre´ de Groot & Hans van Rappard - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):5-23.
    In recent years the cognitive science community has witnessed the rise of a new, dynamical approach to cognition. This approach entails a framework in which cognition and behavior are taken to result from complex dynamical interactions between brain, body, and environment. The advent of the dynamical approach is grounded in a dissatisfaction with the classical computational view of cognition. A particularly strong claim has been that cognitive systems do not rely on internal representations and computations. Focusing on this claim, we (...)
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  11.  87
    What Do Mirror Neurons Mirror?Sebo Uithol, Iris van Rooij, Harold Bekkering & Pim Haselager - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):607 - 623.
    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data acquired from single cell recordings are generally considered to be robust, several debates have shown that the interpretation of these data is far from straightforward. We will show that research based on single-cell recordings allows for (...)
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  12. Consciousness and Agency: The Importance of Self-Organized Action.E. Gonzalez, M. Broens & Pim Haselager - 2004 - Networks 3:103-13.
    Abstract. Following the tracks of Ryle and based upon the theory of complex systems, we shall develop a characterization of action-based consciousness as an embodied, embedded, selforganized process in which action and dispositions occupy a special place. From this perspective, consciousness is not a unique prerogative of humans, but it is spread all around, throughout the evolution of life. We argue that artificial systems such as robots currently lack the genuine embodied embeddedness that allows the type of self-organization that is (...)
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  13. Experimentele filosofie, kunstmatige intelligentie en cognitieve neurowetenschap.Pim Haselager - 2010 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 102 (1):49-58.
    English: In this paper I indicate why I consider 'experimental philosophy' to be good news, though not as good as it could be, and not as all that new. I'll argue that there is no need to restrict experimental philosophy to eliciting intuitions through questionnaires. I'll indicate that good examples of experimental philosophy already exist in Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Neuroscience. Dutch: Hieronder wil ik proberen aan te geven waarom ik de experimentele filosofie weliswaar als goed nieuws beschouw, maar niet (...)
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  14.  7
    Positive Outcomes and Causal Insufficiency Do Not Rule Out the Risk of DBS-Related Identity Changes.Giulio Mecacci & Pim Haselager - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):128-129.
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  15.  3
    Superethics Instead of Superintelligence: Know Thyself, and Apply Science Accordingly.Pim Haselager & Giulio Mecacci - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):113-119.
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  16.  70
    A Young Scientists’ Perspective on DBS: A Plea for an International DBS Organization.Rowan P. Sommers, Roy Dings, Koen I. Neijenhuijs, Hannah Andringa, Sebastian Arts, Daphne van de Bult, Laura Klockenbusch, Emiel Wanningen, Leon C. de Bruin & Pim F. G. Haselager - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):187-190.
    Our think tank tasked by the Dutch Health Council, consisting of Radboud University Nijmegen Honours Academy students with various backgrounds, investigated the implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for psychiatric patients. During this investigation, a number of methodological, ethical and societal difficulties were identified. We consider these difficulties to be a reflection of a still fragmented field of research that can be overcome with improved organization and communication. To this effect, we suggest that it would be useful to found a centralized (...)
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  17.  45
    A Young Scientists’ Perspective on DBS: A Plea for an International DBS Organization.Pim Haselager, Leon Bruin, Emiel Wanningen, Laura Klockenbusch, Daphne Bult, Sebastian Arts, Hannah Andringa, Koen Neijenhuijs, Roy Dings & Rowan Sommers - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):187-190.
    Our think tank tasked by the Dutch Health Council, consisting of Radboud University Nijmegen Honours Academy students with various backgrounds, investigated the implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for psychiatric patients. During this investigation, a number of methodological, ethical and societal difficulties were identified. We consider these difficulties to be a reflection of a still fragmented field of research that can be overcome with improved organization and communication. To this effect, we suggest that it would be useful to found a centralized (...)
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  18.  8
    Lost in Time..Ceci Verbaarschot, Jason Farquhar & Pim Haselager - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:300-315.
  19.  80
    “The Neuroscience of Responsibility”—Workshop Report.Nicole A. Vincent, Pim Haselager & Gert-Jan Lokhorst - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):175-178.
    This is a report on the 3-day workshop “The Neuroscience of Responsibility” that was held in the Philosophy Department at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands during February 11th–13th, 2010. The workshop had 25 participants from The Netherlands, Germany, Italy, UK, USA, Canada and Australia, with expertise in philosophy, neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry and law. Its aim was to identify current trends in neurolaw research related specifically to the topic of responsibility, and to foster international collaborative research on this topic. (...)
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  20.  9
    Five Criteria for Assessing the Implications of NTA Technology.Giulio Mecacci & Pim Haselager - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):21-23.
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  21.  54
    Corrigendum to “Lost in Time…: The Search for Intentions and Readiness Potentials” [Consciousness and Cognition 33 300–315].Ceci Verbaarschot, Jason Farquhar & Pim Haselager - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:300-315.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053810015002378 -/- the original Fig. 4B published in this paper was incorrect.
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  22.  69
    Like the Breathability of Air: Embodied Embedded Communication.Pim Haselager - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):263-274.
    I present experimental and computational research, inspired by the perspective of Embodied Embedded Cognition, concerning various aspects of language as supporting Everett’s interactionist view of language. Based on earlier and ongo- ing work, I briefly illustrate the contribution of the environment to the syste- maticity displayed in linguistic performance, the importance of joint attention for the development of a shared vocabulary, the role of (limited) traveling for language diversification, the function of perspective taking in social communica- tion, and the bodily (...)
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  23.  7
    Probing for Intentions: Why Clocks Do Not Provide the Only Measurement of Time.Ceci Verbaarschot, Pim Haselager & Jason Farquhar - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  24.  8
    Useful Review Marked by Conceptual Vagueness.Ceci Verbaarschot & Pim Haselager - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (1):47-48.
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  25.  4
    Corrigendum to “Lost in Time…: The Search for Intentions and Readiness Potentials” [Consciousness and Cognition 33 300–315]. [REVIEW]Ceci Verbaarschot, Jason Farquhar & Pim Haselager - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 40:159.