Results for 'Plato, Socrates, Justice'

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  1.  7
    Interpreting Plato Socratically: Socrates and Justice.J. Angelo Corlett - 2018 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
    J. Angelo Corlett’s new book, Interpreting Plato Socratically continues the critical discussion of the Platonic Question where Corlett’s book, Interpreting Plato’s Dialogues concluded. New arguments in favor of the Mouthpiece Interpretation of Plato’s works are considered and shown to be fallacious, as are new objections to some competing approaches to Plato’s works. The Platonic Question is the problem of how to approach and interpret Plato’s writings most of which are dialogues. How, if at all, can Plato’s beliefs, doctrines, theories and (...)
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  2. Plato's Republic. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    Plato's Republic, one of the great works in the history of philosophy, is presented here as it was written - as a dramatic performance exploring various perspectives on justice, truth, knowledge, and the good. Plato wrote each book of The Republic to be performed by actors playing the characters of Socrates, Glaucon, Adeimantus, Thrasymachus, and the others. When Book One was performed, he then invited his students—the brightest and best young people in Athens—to respond to each and every argument, (...)
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  3.  15
    The Trial and Death of Socrates: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Death Scene From Phaedo.G. M. A. Plato & Grube - 2000 - New York: Dover Publications. Edited by Benjamin Jowett.
    The classical Athenian philosopher Socrates was tried in 399 BCE on the basis of two notoriously ambiguous charges: corrupting the youth and impiety (in Greek, asebeia). A majority of the 501 dikasts (Athenian citizen-jurors) voted to convict him. Socrates was ultimately sentenced to death by drinking a hemlock-based liquid. This well-known account of the trial is by Plato, one of Socrates' students and a famous philosopher in his own right. Whether Socrates was punished unjustly is a contested issue which to (...)
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  4.  16
    Plato's Republic.I. A. Plato & Richards - 1966 - Cambridge,: Cambridge University Press. Edited by I. A. Richards.
    You'd never know Athens was locked in a life-or-death struggle from the tranquil and leisurely philosophical discussion that unfolds through the pages of the Republic...Plato's masterpiece continues to inform our questions and our thinking when it comes to being, truth, beauty, goodness, justice, community, the soul, and more." -From Dr. Littlejohn's Introduction. On the way back from a festival, Socrates is waylaid by some friends who compel him to go home with them. There he and his companions engage in (...)
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  5. Plato's Republic: Audio Cd. Plato - 2001 - Agora Publications.
    Plato's Republic, one of the great works in the history of philosophy, is presented here as it was written - as a dramatic performance exploring various perspectives on justice, truth, knowledge, and the good. Plato wrote each book of The Republic to be performed by actors playing the characters of Socrates, Glaucon, Adeimantus, Thrasymachus, and the others. When Book One was performed, he then invited his students—the brightest and best young people in Athens—to respond to each and every argument, (...)
     
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  6. Plato, Socrates, and the Dialogues.Michael Sugrue - 1996 - Teaching Co..
    pt. 2: The domain of the Dialogues ; What Socratic dialogue is not ; The examined life ; Tragedy in the philosophic age of the Greeks ; Republic I, Justice, power, knowledge ; Republic II-V, Soul and city ; Republic VI-X, The architecture of reality ; Laws, The legacy of Cephalus -- pt. 2: Protagoras, The dialectic of the many and the one ; Gorgias, The temptation to speak ; Parmenides, Most true ; Sophist & statesman, The formal disintegration (...)
     
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  7. Plato's Republic, Books One & Two: Audio Cd. Plato - 1998 - Agora Publications.
    In Books One and Two of The Republic presents a discussion of the nature of justice by Socrates, the aging Cephalus, his son Polemarchus, and the sophist Thrasymachus. Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, take over in Book Two, challenging Socrates to convince them that a just life is preferable to an unjust life with power, fame, and riches. They imagine and evaluate different ways of creating the best possible human life. First, they consider a republic based on health and (...)
     
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  8. Plato's Republic, Books One & Two. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books One and Two of The Republic presents a discussion of the nature of justice by Socrates, the aging Cephalus, his son Polemarchus, and the sophist Thrasymachus. Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, take over in Book Two, challenging Socrates to convince them that a just life is preferable to an unjust life with power, fame, and riches. They imagine and evaluate different ways of creating the best possible human life. First, they consider a republic based on health and (...)
     
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  9.  15
    Euthyphro.Ian Plato & Walker - 1984 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. Edited by C. J. Emlyn-Jones, William Preddy & Plato.
    Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family circa 427 BC. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, among whose many notable alumni was Aristotle. Traditionally ascribed to Plato are thirty-five dialogues developing Socrates' dialectic method and composed with great stylistic virtuosity, together with (...)
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  10.  3
    Crito.C. J. Plato & Emlyn-Jones - 1940 - New York city,: R.N. Ascher & R.S. Rodwin at the Fieldston school press. Edited by Benjamin Jowett.
    Crito is a dialogue by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. It depicts a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy friend Crito regarding justice, injustice, and the appropriate response to injustice. Socrates thinks that injustice may not be answered with injustice, and refuses Crito's offer to finance his escape from prison. The dialogue contains an ancient statement of the social contract theory of government.
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  11. Plato's Republic, Books Three & Four. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books Three and Four of The Republic, Socrates and Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, discuss the best way to educate leaders for a just republic. In the course of their dialogue, the meaning of justice in individuals and in society shifts from external order imposed through rules and regulations to the harmony and balance internal to every person in the republic. Only then will an individual be ready to act—whether in acquiring wealth, in the care of the body, (...)
     
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  12.  32
    Republic: 1-2.368c4. Plato - 2007 - Oxford: Aris & Phillips. Edited by C. J. Emlyn-Jones.
    Republic, Plato's best known and most frequently read dialogue, although receiving a flood of translations and philosophical analysis over the last 100 years, has in recent times been quite short of detailed commentaries. In particular, a full edition of the introductory sections of the dialogue, representing, probably, a single papyrus roll in the original text, has not been attempted for more than fifty years. In that period scholarship has moved on, and this edition aims to take into account recent developments (...)
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  13.  49
    "Gorgias" and "Phaedrus": Rhetoric, Philosophy, and Politics. Plato - 2014 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Edited by James H. Nichols & Plato.
    With a masterful sense of the place of rhetoric in both thought and practice and an ear attuned to the clarity, natural simplicity, and charm of Plato's Greek prose, James H. Nichols Jr., offers precise yet unusually readable translations of two great Platonic dialogues on rhetoric. The Gorgias presents an intransigent argument that justice is superior to injustice: To the extent that suffering an injustice is preferable to committing an unjust act. The dialogue contains some of Plato's most significant (...)
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  14.  83
    Why Plato Lost Interest in the Socratic Method.Gareth Matthews - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 54.
    The Socratic elenchus is a method of philosophical analysis which Plato largely dropped in his middle and later writings, with two exceptions, Republic 1 and the Theaetetus. But it is a mistake to describe these as elenctic dialogues, which typically seek an analysis of a virtue in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions, by questioning some alleged expert about its essence. Republic 1 does not follow this pattern: Thrasymachus fundamentally objects to such a procedure and the presuppositions underlying it, while (...)
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  15. Socrates' Defense of Justice in Plato's "Republic".In Ha Jang - 1993 - Dissertation, Boston College
    In this dissertation, I examine Socrates' defense of justice in Plato's Republic. I contend that recognizing the problematic character of Socrates' defense of justice in the Republic is a key to understanding his teaching regarding justice. In response to the request made by Glaucon and Adeimantus at the beginning of Book Two, Socrates tries to show, in the bulk of the Republic, that justice is intrinsically good and that it is better than injustice. In doing so, (...)
     
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  16. 'Law and Justice among the Socratics: Contexts for Plato’s Republic'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2021 - Polis 38 (3):399-419.
    At the beginning of Republic 2 (358e–359b), Plato has Glaucon ascribe a social contract theory to Thrasymachus and ‘countless others’. This paper takes Glaucon’s description to refer both within the text to Thrasymachus’ views, and outside the text to a series of works, most of which have been lost, On Justice or On Law. It examines what is likely to be the earliest surviving work that presents a philosophical defence of law and justice against those who would prefer (...)
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  17. Socratic Teaching and Justice: Plato's Clitophon.Jan Blits - 1985 - Interpretation 13 (3):321-334.
     
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  18. Just Silence in Plato’s Clitophon.Shane Gassaway - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):266-288.
    Plato’s Clitophon presents a confrontation between two alternative views of justice, one conventional and the other philosophical – and of Clitophon’s inability to move from the one to the other due to his confusion over the relationship between knowledge and virtue and his misconception of the path from ignorance to knowledge, which probably results from his ambition. The nature of this confusion is such that Clitophon can only overcome it by abandoning his submissive stance toward the authority of Socrates, (...)
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  19. Justice of the Singular: Socrates' Apology and Deconstruction.Mathieu-Pierre Buchler - 2020 - L'Atelier 1 (12):68-89.
    The question of justice in Western philosophy finds its humble beginnings in the interplay of life and death. I am referring here to Plato’s Apology. The Apology is not only a text tracing the fate of the great philosopher Socrates by recounting his final speech before the judges of Athens, but it is also a text that, on a more subtle level, announces the advent of a promising justice that is birthed from death, or, to be more precise, (...)
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  20.  15
    Justice and Piety in Plato’s Euthyphro.Georgia Sermamoglou-Soulmaidi - 2024 - Ancient Philosophy 44 (1):17-32.
    In Plato’s Euthyphro, Socrates raises the question whether piety is coextensive with justice, or a part of it (11e4-12a2; cf. 12c10-d3). Euthyphro chooses the latter option, and seeks to determine the part of justice that piety happens to be. Scholars have debated fiercely about whether Socrates shares this view (Calef 1995a; McPherran 1995; Calef 1995b). This paper argues that, if Euthyphro is to remain consistent throughout the dialogue, coextensiveness must be favored over the part-of-justice view. If this (...)
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  21. Socrates and Godlikeness in Plato’s Theaetetus.Zina Giannopoulou - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:135-148.
    In this paper I argue that in the digression in Plato’s Theaetetus godlikeness may be construed as Socrates’ ethical achievement, part and parcel of his art of mental mid­wifery. Although the philosophical life of contemplation and detachment from earthly affairs exemplifies the human ideal of godlikeness, Socrates’ godlikeness is an inferior but legitimate species of the genus. This is the case because Socratic godlikeness abides by the two requirements for godlikeness that Socrates sets forth in the digression: first, it is (...)
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  22.  90
    Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's "Apology".Dougal Blyth - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):1 - 22.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's ApologyDougal BlythI am going to argue in this paper that, in the three speeches constituting his Apology of Socrates, Plato presents the judicial proceedings that led to Socrates' execution as having precisely the opposite significance to their superficial legal meaning. This re-evaluation will lead to some reflections on the politics of Socrates' defence, and, similarly, on Plato's own aims in (...)
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  23. Justice and Compulsion for Plato’s Philosopher–Rulers.Eric Brown - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):1-17.
    By considering carefully Socrates' invocations of 'compulsion' in Plato's Republic, I seek to explain how both justice and compulsion are crucial to the philosophers' decision to rule in Kallipolis, so that this decision does not contradict Socrates' central thesis that it is always in one's interests to act justly. On my account, the compulsion is provided by a law, made by the city's lawgivers, that requires people raised to be philosophers take turns ruling. Justice by itself does not (...)
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  24.  28
    Readings of Plato’s Apology of Socrates.Vivil Valvik Haraldsen, Olof Pettersson & Oda E. Wiese Tvedt (eds.) - 2017 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    In Plato’s Apology of Socrates we see a philosopher in collision with his society—a society he nonetheless claims to have benefited through his philosophic activity. It has often been asked why democratic Athens condemned a philosopher of Socrates' character to death. This anthology examines the contribution made by Plato’s Apology of Socrates to our understanding of the character of Socrates as well as of the conception of philosophy Plato attributes to him. The 11 chapters offer complementary readings of the Apology, (...)
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  25.  56
    Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito (review).Mark L. McPherran - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):620-621.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato’s Crito by Roslyn WeissMark L. McPherranRoslyn Weiss. Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato’s Crito. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. Pp. xii + 187. Cloth, $39.95.The speech by ‘the Laws’ of the Crito has commonly been understood as a case of Socratic ventriloquism, voicing a doctrine of authoritarian civic obligation that Socrates himself endorses. This, of course, generates the standard problem of (...)
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  26.  7
    Between Socrates and the many: a study of Plato's Crito.J. Michael Hoffpauir - 2020 - Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books.
    In studying Plato's Crito with a primary concern for Plato's friend Crito, this book reveals the rarity of the philosopher, the tension between the citizen's natural understanding of justice and the city's necessary understanding of justice, and how one might attempt to ease this tension.
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  27.  20
    Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's Apology.Douglas Blyth - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):1-22.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's ApologyDougal BlythI am going to argue in this paper that, in the three speeches constituting his Apology of Socrates, Plato presents the judicial proceedings that led to Socrates' execution as having precisely the opposite significance to their superficial legal meaning. This re-evaluation will lead to some reflections on the politics of Socrates' defence, and, similarly, on Plato's own aims in (...)
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  28.  27
    Justice for All Without Exception: Julia Ward Howe's 1886 Lecture “The Position of Women in Plato's Republic”.Mary Townsend - 2021 - Hypatia 36 (1):145-171.
    Julia Ward Howe, author of the lyrics to “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” remains known as a poet, abolitionist, and founding member of the antiracist organization American Woman Suffrage Association, but her work on political philosophy and her foundational sense of the necessity for justice and suffrage for all without exception are still unexplored. Howe's speech, “The Position of Women in Plato's Republic” provides a window into the philosophy that shaped the second half of her life and her (...)
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  29.  41
    The Unity of Plato's 'Gorgias': Rhetoric, Justice, and the Philosophic Life.Devin Stauffer - 2006 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Stauffer demonstrates the complex unity of Plato's Gorgias through a careful analysis of the dialogue's three main sections. This includes Socrates' famous argumentative duel with Callicles, a passionate critic of justice and philosophy, showing how the seemingly disparate themes of rhetoric, justice and the philosophic life are woven together into a coherent whole. His interpretation of the Gorgias sheds new light on Plato's thought, showing that Plato and Socrates had a more favourable view of rhetoric than is usually (...)
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  30. The Problem of Justice in Plato’s Republic.Erjus Mezini - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry 40 (3-4):178-191.
    Plato’s account of justice in the Republic has been questioned by David Sachs, who charges Plato for committing a fallacy of irrelevance. Sachs’ objection is built on the assumption that Plato has employed two accounts of justice: a vulgar one, and a Platonic one. Insofar as Socrates’ interlocutors hold a vulgar conception, then Socrates should prove to them that being vulgarly just will be beneficial to them. But Socrates, according to Sachs, never does that. Through emphasizing the dialogues (...)
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  31.  20
    Socrates and Godlikeness in Plato’s Theaetetus.Zina Giannopoulou - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:135-148.
    In this paper I argue that in the digression in Plato’s Theaetetus godlikeness may be construed as Socrates’ ethical achievement, part and parcel of his art of mental mid­wifery. Although the philosophical life of contemplation and detachment from earthly affairs exemplifies the human ideal of godlikeness, Socrates’ godlikeness is an inferior but legitimate species of the genus. This is the case because Socratic godlikeness abides by the two requirements for godlikeness that Socrates sets forth in the digression: first, it is (...)
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  32. Plato's Defense of Justice in the Republic.Rachel G. K. Singpurwalla - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's "Republic". Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 263-282.
    Socrates' aim in the Republic is to show that being just is crucial for happiness. In Republic IV, Socrates argues that the just individual is one in whom each part of the soul or psyche performs its proper function, with the result that the individual attains psychic harmony. Commentators have worried, however, that this account of what it is to be just has little to do with being just in the ordinary sense of the term, which involves acting with regard (...)
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  33.  26
    ¿Debió Sócrates haber aceptado el reto de Glaucón y Adimanto?Thomas M. Robinson - 2009 - Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34):11-26.
    Aunque el Libro I de República parece un diálogo socrático estándar sobre un término moral como justicia, que culmina con un estado de aparente aporía, se termina afirmando que la justicia es como un estado del alma caracterizado por el conocimiento. El libro I termina siendo el preámbulo para mostrar que ser justo es mejor que ser injusto, y que la justicia es en y por sí misma beneficiosa sin relación con cualquier ‘recompensa o consecuencia’ que devenga para el individuo (...)
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  34.  15
    Between Socrates and the Many: A Study of Plato’s Crito.J. Michael Hoffpauir - 2019 - Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books.
    In studying Plato’s Crito with a primary concern for Plato's friend Crito, this book reveals the rarity of the philosopher, the tension between the citizen’s natural understanding of justice and the city’s necessary understanding of justice, and how one might attempt to ease this tension.
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  35.  24
    The Suicidal Philosopher: Plato's Socrates.Anna B. Christensen - 2020 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 37 (4):309-330.
    Since the Phaedo characterizes Socrates’s death as a punishment by Athens, many scholars argue that he could neither have been responsible for nor have intended his death, so that his death was not suicide. This is no mere semantic quibble: the question turns on issues of responsible and intentional action. I argue that the dialogues portray Socrates as committing suicide. To do so, I use a Platonic account of responsibility and intention to show how Athens and Socrates were jointly responsible (...)
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  36.  7
    Justice Brings Happiness in Plato's Republic.Joshua I. Weinstein - 2011-09-16 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 201–207.
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  37.  30
    Ignorance or Irony in Plato’s Socrates?: A Look Beyond Avowals and Disavowals of Knowledge.Scott J. Senn - 2013 - Plato Journal 13:77-108.
    My central thesis is that Socrates of Plato’s “early” dialogues believes he has the very wisdom he famously disavows. Eschewing the usual tack of analyzing his various avowals and disavowals of knowledge, I focus on other claims which entail a belief that he has wisdom par excellence—not just selfawareness of ignorance and not just so-called elenctic wisdom. First, I correct the common misimpression that Socrates is willing only to ask but not to answer questions. Indeed, he describes his own answers (...)
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  38.  74
    Piety and Justice: Plato's ‘Euthyphro’: PHILOSOPHY.Frederick Rosen - 1968 - Philosophy 43 (164):105-116.
    Piety is not a theme that normally attracts the modern mind. In our own age rebellion has a more prominent position and the theme of impiety strikes a more sympathetic note. We are led to examine Plato's Euthyphro as much for the hints we find on the subject of impiety as for whatever it might contain on the seemingly drab subject of the holy. The Euthyphro is also a dialogue concerned with justice, a recurrent theme in the Platonic corpus, (...)
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  39.  18
    Persuasion, Justice and Democracy in Plato’s Crito.Yosef Z. Liebersohn - 2015 - Peitho 6 (1):147-166.
    Speeches and persuasion dominate Plato’s Crito. This paper, paying particular attention to the final passage in the dialogue, shows that the focus on speeches, persuasion and allusions to many other elements of rhetoric is an integral part of Plato’s severe criticism of democracy, one of the main points of the Crito. Speeches allow members of a democracy – represented in our dialogue by Crito – firstly to break the law for self-interested reasons while considering themselves still to be law-abiding citizens, (...)
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  40.  51
    Two Theories of Natural Justice in Plato’s Gorgias.Leo Catana - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (2):209-228.
    In Plato’s Gorgias 482c4–484c3, Callicles advances a concept of natural justice: the laws of the polis must agree with nature, that is, human nature. Since human nature is characterised by its desire to get a greater share, nature itself makes it legitimate that stronger human beings get a greater share than weaker ones. Socrates objects: Callicles’ theoretical approach to civic life poses a threat to the polis’ community, its citizens, and to the friendship amongst its citizens. However, Socrates accepts (...)
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  41.  56
    Piety and Justice: Plato's 'Euthyphro'.Frederick Rosen - 1968 - Philosophy 43 (164):105 - 116.
    Piety is not a theme that normally attracts the modern mind. In our own age rebellion has a more prominent position and the theme of impiety strikes a more sympathetic note. We are led to examine Plato's Euthyphro as much for the hints we find on the subject of impiety as for whatever it might contain on the seemingly drab subject of the holy. The Euthyphro is also a dialogue concerned with justice, a recurrent theme in the Platonic corpus, (...)
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  42. Plato's Challenge: the Case against Justice in Republic II.Christopher Shields - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's "Republic". Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 63-83.
    This chapter contains section titled: The Situation of Republic II What Kind of Good is Justice? The Origin and Nature of Justice The Tale of Gyges Life Choices Socrates' Reaction and Ours.
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  43.  8
    The point of view on the justice of Socrates in Plato's Republic and its limits. 이명곤 - 2015 - 동서철학연구(Dong Seo Cheol Hak Yeon Gu; Studies in Philosophy East-West) 75 (75):279-302.
    소크라테스는 당시 그리스 사회에 통용하고 있던 다양한 정의개념을 논박하면서 자신의 정의관을 말하고 있다. 그가 비판하고 있는 정의 개념들은 정직함과 빌린 것을 제때에 갚는 것이라는 ‘형식적 정의개념’, 친구에게는 좋은 것을 주고 적에게는 나쁜 것을 준다는 ‘이기적 정의개념’, 착한 사람에게는 좋은 것을 주고 나쁜 사람에게는 나쁜 것을 준다는 ‘복수법의 정의개념’ 그리고 보다 강한 자들의 자기이익을 추구하는 것이라는 ‘정글의 정의개념’ 등이다. 소크라테스가 제시하는 정의 개념은 한 개인의 사회적 자기 동일성에 적합한 ‘탁월한 내적인 상태(aretē)’를 갖추는 것으로 본 논문에서는 이를 ‘개인적 정의’ 혹은 ‘존재론적인 정의’ (...)
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  44. Sokrates sam ze sobą rozmawia o sprawiedliwości [Socrates Talks to Himself about Justice]. Piechowiak - 2009 - In Artur Pacewicz (ed.), Kolokwia Platońskie - Gorgias. Instytut Filozofii Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego. pp. 71-92.
    The analysis focuses on the passage of Gorgias (506c–507c) in which Plato’s Socrates is having a dialog with himself. Socrates is talking to someone who, better than any other partner of discussion, is capable to discern the truth; this is an extraordinary way of expressing philosophical views by Plato. It suggests that in this passage Plato is considering questions which are of a primary importance. There are also other signs, both in the structure of the text and in the comments (...)
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  45. Plato’s Introduction to the Question of Justice[REVIEW]Bradley Lewis - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (3):652-653.
    This concise and well-written volume consists of a detailed interpretation of the first book of Plato’s Republic and a somewhat less detailed interpretation of the beginning of the second book. The interpretation is meant to show the superiority of the Socratic-Platonic inquiry into justice to those undertaken by Kant, on the one hand, and postmodernist antifoundationalism, on the other. The deep problem that the beginning of the Republic forces us to confront is the tension between our ordinary understanding of (...)
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  46.  7
    Plato's Ethics: Early and Middle Dialogues.Terry Penner - 2018 - In Sean D. Kirkland & Eric Sanday (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press. pp. 151–169.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Socrates and Plato: Conflicting Psychologies of Action The Desire for Good in Platonic Ethics Peculiarities of the Treatment of Justice as Psychological Well‐adjustment Psychological Well‐adjustment as what the Socratic Science of Justice must become given the new Platonic Psychology of Action The Development of Greek Ethics Through Plato Bibliography.
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  47.  27
    The consistency of Thrasymachus’ theses on justice in Plato’s Republic I.Luiz Maurício Bentim da Rocha Menezes - 2020 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 30:03001-03001.
    The discussion between Thrasymachus and Socrates in Book I of Plato's Republic instead the question about justice started with Cephalus. Thrasymachus is an important character, who relates justice to the city government. This causes justice to leave individual sphere and enter public sphere. In our article, we want to verify how Thrasymachus' theses on justice and whether they are consistent with each other. The problem of consistency of theses is old among commentators and presents different solutions. (...)
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  48.  5
    Plato's mythologizing of the myth of Er: the Republic's myth of Er exposed.Chrysovalantis Petridis - 2009 - Portland, Oregon: Inkwater Press.
    The Republic is the quintessential Platonic dialogue concerning justice and politics. This great ten-book work ends with the Myth of Er. This myth has been a source of controversy throughout history. Some claim Plato wrote it, while others claim it is a forgery. Still others claim it is a lost story saved in the annals of history only by Plato. In response to the limited scholarship about Er, Mr. Chrysovalantis Petridis undertook a painstaking analysis of both the Republic and (...)
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  49.  51
    On Praising the Appearance of Justice in Platos Republic.P. T. Mackenzie - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (4):617 - 624.
    In Book II of Plato's Republic, Glaucon, after putting on the mantle of Thrasymachus, concludes that in order for Socrates to show that justice is to be valued for its own sake, he must show that the just man who appears to be unjust is happier than the unjust man who appears to be just. In other words, according to Glaucon, Socrates must show that the just man who as a result of appearing to be unjust is thrown in (...)
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  50.  38
    Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues. [REVIEW]Mark L. McPherran - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):583-584.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Cross-Examining Socrates. A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato’s Early DialoguesMark L. McPherranJohn Beversluis. Cross-Examining Socrates. A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato’s Early Dialogues. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Pp. xii + 416. Cloth, $69.95.This book is a valuable and thoroughly-researched contribution to the study of Plato's Socratic dialogues. Its fine qualities stem in part from its cathartic motivations: for years Beversluis suppressed his ever-growing reservations concerning (...)
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