Results for 'Plato's Myth of Er'

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  1.  68
    Plato’s Poetic Wisdom in the Myth of Er.Keping Wang - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):282-293.
    The interlink between myth and wisdom in Hellenic heritage is characteristically embodied in the Platonic philosophizing as regards the education and enculturation of the human psyche. As is read in the end of The Republic , the myth of Er turns out to be a philosophical rewriting of poetry to a large degree. For it engagingly reveals Plato’s moral inculcation, philosophical instruction and poetic wisdom in particular, all of which are intended to guide human conduct along the right (...)
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  2.  14
    Tyrant and Philosopher: Two Fundamental Lives in Plato’s Myth of Er.Andy German - 2012 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 29 (1):42-61.
    What is the significance of the recurring link between tyranny and philosophy in Plato? Often, Plato’s treatment of tyranny is discussed either in the context of moral psychology—as a problem of agency, moral choice and akrasia — or political science, where it is the limit case of political decline. It is suggested, however, that a close inspection of the myth of Er and an elucidation of its neglected links, not just with the rest of the Republic but also with (...)
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  3.  30
    Philosophy as Spiritual Formation: Plato’s Myth of Er.Irwin C. Lieb - 1963 - International Philosophical Quarterly 3 (2):271-285.
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  4.  15
    An Apolline Presence in Plato's Myth of Er?Kent Moors - 1988 - Bijdragen 49 (4):435-437.
  5. ""Plato¿ s" Real Astronomy" and the Myth of Er.Vassilis Kalfas - 1996 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 17 (1):5-20.
  6. Gender Myth and the Mind-City Composite: From Plato’s Atlantis to Walter Benjamin’s Philosophical Urbanism.Abraham Akkerman - 2012 - GeoJournal (in Press; Online Version Published) 78.
    In the early twentieth century Walter Benjamin introduced the idea of epochal and ongoing progression in interaction between mind and the built environment. Since early antiquity, the present study suggests, Benjamin’s notion has been manifest in metaphors of gender in city-form, whereby edifices and urban voids have represented masculinity and femininity, respectively. At the onset of interaction between mind and the built environment are prehistoric myths related to the human body and to the sky. During antiquity gender projection can be (...)
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  7.  17
    Of Myth, Life, and War in Plato’s Republic.Claudia Baracchi - 2002 - Indiana University Press.
    "Baracchi has identified pivotal points around which the Republic operates; this allows a reading of the entire text to unfold.... a very beautifully written book." —Walter Brogan "... a work that opens new and timely vistas within the Republic.... Her approach... is thorough and rigorous." —John Sallis Although Plato’s Republic is perhaps the most influential text in the history of Western philosophy, Claudia Baracchi finds that the work remains obscure and enigmatic. To fully understand and appreciate its meaning, she argues, (...)
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  8. Of Myth and Life. On the Question of "Genesis" in Plato's "Republic".Claudia Baracchi - 1996 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation is a propaedeutic to the study of the myth of Er concluding Plato's dialogue on the politeia. This work would have to be understood, therefore, as a set of remarks having a merely preparatory function with respect to the analysis of the myth proper. ;A number of crucial issues had to be elucidated before setting out to encounter Socrates' mythical narration in a meaningful way. It seemed important, above all, to consider the general issue of (...)
     
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  9.  34
    The Myth of Cronus in Plato’s Statesman: Cosmic Rotation and Earthly Correspondence.Corinne Gartner & Claudia Yau - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):437-462.
    The cosmological myth in Plato’s Statesman has generated several longstanding scholarly disputes, among them a controversy concerning the number and nature of the cosmic rotation cycles that it depicts. According to the standard interpretation, there are two cycles of rotation: west-to-east rotation occurs during the age of Cronus, and east-to-west rotation occurs during the age of Zeus, which is also our present era. Recent readings have challenged this two-cycle interpretation, arguing that the period of rotation opposed to our own (...)
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  10.  15
    Review of Myth and Metaphysics in Plato's Phaedo by David A. White. [REVIEW]George Rudebusch - 1992 - The Thomist 56 (4):726-732.
    I review White's account of the swan song, of Socrates' last words, and of the importance of myth in Plato. Against any account of myth as a remedy in the nature of rational argument, I defend Hegel's account that myth addresses a less-than-fully-rational part of the soul.
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  11. Combating Oblivion: The Myth of Er as Both Philosophy's Challenge and Inspiration.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  12. Glaucon’s Reward, Philosophy’s Debt: The Myth of Er.G. R. F. Ferrari - 2008 - In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press.
  13.  61
    The Geography of Finitude: Myth and Earth in Plato’s Phaedo.Sara Brill - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):5-23.
    Plato’s use of afterlife myths is often viewed as an abandonment of rational discourse for a coercive practice designed to persuade citizens to be concerned about the condition of their souls by appealing to their worst fears about the afterlife. But such interpretations overlook the frequently critical tenor of Plato’s myths. In this paper I develop the claim that Plato appeals to muthos as a means of critiquing various specific logoi by focusing upon the relationship between the myth of (...)
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  14.  1
    Husserl’s Timaeus. Plato’s Creation Myth and the Phenomenological Concept of Metaphysics as the Teleological Science of the World.Emiliano Trizio - 2020 - Studia Phaenomenologica 20:77-100.
    According to Husserl, Plato played a fundamental role in the development of the notion of teleology, so much so that Husserl viewed the myth narrated in the Timaeus as a fundamental stage in the long history that he hoped would eventually lead to a teleological science of the world grounded in transcendental phenomenology. This article explores this interpretation of Plato’s legacy in light of Husserl’s thesis that Plato was the initiator of the ideal of genuine science. It also outlines (...)
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  15.  18
    Zeus and Philosophy in the Myth of Plato’s Phaedrus.M. Dyson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (02):307-.
    The matter which I wish to discuss is a discrepancy between two accounts of the origin of the philosopher in the myth of Plato's Phaedrus. Before their incarnation the souls of all humans are imagined as having enjoyed the vision of reality, but not all in the same company or to the same degree. For, in the first place, the souls are distributed among the companies that severally follow eleven different gods, 247 a-b, a distribution which is regarded (...)
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  16.  3
    The Golden Age and the Reversal of the Myth of Good Government in Plato’s Statesman. A Lesson on the Use of Models.Fulvia de Luise - 2020 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 20.
    We would be wrong to state that Plato’s approach to the Golden Age in the Statesman occurs through nostalgia, even if he stresses the immense distance between our world and that blessed time. After evoking the shepherd-god as a ruler, Plato shows that the completely abandoned disposition of the ruled is only justifiable in presence of an unbridgeable chasm between the two, such as that between gods and men, or men and beasts. The real question in the Statesman is how (...)
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  17.  27
    The Appropriation of Myth and the Sayings of the Wise in Plato’s Meno and Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:169-178.
    In this article, I discuss the incorporation of traditional ‘sayings of the wise’ and the mythical presentation of certain doctrines in the Platonic dialogues, particularly the Meno’s myth of recollection and the Philebus’s myth of the limit and the unlimited. I argue against a common view of Platonic myth, which holds that such passages are merely rhetorical devices and naive presentations of philosophical doctrines, whose aura of traditional authority ultimately forestalls and inhibits philosophical reflection. I attempt to (...)
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  18.  9
    A Unity of Opposites: Heidegger's Journey Through Plato.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):373-388.
    In his 1942 lectures on Hölderlin’s der Ister, Heidegger discerns within Hölderlin’s poetry a movement beyond the strictures of metaphysics and its representational language. This movement finds its most explicit articulation in the figure of the appropriative journey of the poet from the home into the land of the foreign fire. I argue that Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin is rendered problematic by Heidegger’s own treatment of Plato’s ‘Myth of Er’ as it appears in his 1942–1943 Parmenides lectures, and that (...)
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  19.  2
    A Unity of Opposites: Heidegger’s Journey Through Plato.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):373-388.
    In his 1942 lectures on Hölderlin’s der Ister, Heidegger discerns within Hölderlin’s poetry a movement beyond the strictures of metaphysics and its representational language. This movement finds its most explicit articulation in the figure of the appropriative journey of the poet from the home into the land of the foreign fire. I argue that Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin is rendered problematic by Heidegger’s own treatment of Plato’s ‘Myth of Er’ as it appears in his 1942–1943 Parmenides lectures, and that (...)
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  20.  98
    Free Will, Luck, and Happiness in the Myth of Er.Kenneth Dorter - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28:129-142.
    According to the Myth of Er we are responsible for our character because we chose it before birth. But any choice is determined by our present character, sothere is an indefinite regress and we cannot be entirely responsible for our character. The Myth of Er can be seen as the first formulation of the problem of free will, which Aristotle demythologizes in Nicomachean Ethics III.5. Plato's solution is that freedom is compatible with causal determinism because it does (...)
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  21.  12
    Free Will, Luck, and Happiness in the Myth of Er.Kenneth Dorter - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28:129-142.
    According to the Myth of Er we are responsible for our character because we chose it before birth. But any choice is determined by our present character, sothere is an indefinite regress and we cannot be entirely responsible for our character. The Myth of Er can be seen as the first formulation of the problem of free will, which Aristotle demythologizes in Nicomachean Ethics III.5. Plato's solution is that freedom is compatible with causal determinism because it does (...)
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  22.  73
    Myth and the Structure of Plato’s Euthyphro.Daniel Werner - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (1):41-62.
    Moving beyond the piecemeal approach to the Euthyphro that has dominated much of the previous secondary literature, I aim in this article to understand the dialogue as an integrated whole. I argue that the question of myth underlies the philosophical and dialogical progression of the Euthyphro. It is an adherence to traditional myth that motivates each of Euthyphro’s definitions and that also accounts for their failure. The dialogue thus presents a broad criticism of traditional myth. But, as (...)
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  23.  22
    Of Myth, Life, and War in Plato’s Republic. [REVIEW]John A. Scott - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):601-603.
    She presents Plato as alarmed by the mimetic potency of his mythic text, and driven to apologize for it, but without recanting either the text or the apology. He apologizes for the perils of text as he regenerates it. She invites us to listen with premodern ears to the Republic’s text through its echos in her postmodern sensibility.
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  24. The Pragmatics of "Myth" in Plato's Dialogues: The Story of Prometheus in the Protagoras.Claude Calame - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  25. Religion and Morality. Elements of Plato's Anthropology in the Myth of Prometheus (PROTAGORAS, 320D-322D).Gerd Van Riel - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
     
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  26. “The Theory of Recollection in Plato’s Meno”: Against a Myth of Platonic Scholarship.Theodor Ebert - 2007 - In Brisson Erler (ed.), Gorgias – Menon. Selected Papers from the Seventh Symposium Platonicum. Academia Verlag. pp. 184-198.
    This paper argues that Plato’s Meno does not offer evidence for a belief, commonly attributed to Plato, that we when learning something recollect what we learn from previous existences. This “theory of recollection” is a construct based on a reading of the relevant passages in the Meno which does not take into account the dialectical aspect of Socrates’ discussion with his interlocutor. And in one passage (81e3) it is based on a variant reading for which a better and better attested (...)
     
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  27.  16
    The Structure of Plato’s Republic and the Cave Allegory.Raul Gutiérrez - 2019 - Peitho 10 (1):65-84.
    As Plato’s Phaedrus 246c stipulates, every logos must be structured like a living being, i.e., the relation of all its parts to one another and to the whole must be appropriate. Thus, the present paper argues that Plato’s masterwork has been organized in accord with the ascent/descent movement as presented in the Allegory of the Cave: Book I represents eikasia, Books II–IV.434c exemplify pistis, Book IV.434d–444e illustrates dianoia and Books V–VII express noesis. Having reached the anabasis the philosopher turns to (...)
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  28.  57
    The Philosopher's Stories: The Role of Myth in Plato's Pedagogy.Anthony Hooper - 2010 - The European Legacy 15 (7):843-853.
    In this essay I will argue that Platonic myths are a useful tool not only in the education of the ignorant but for the philosophical mind as well. To do this I will first examine the limitations and problems that Plato sees in written communication, and I will then argue that myths avoid these problems by undermining their own validity. If they are to avoid the problems that plague the written format, myths must show themselves for what they are: inadequate (...)
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  29.  29
    Plato’s Myth of the Reversed Cosmos.Stanley Rosen - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (1):59 - 85.
    EVERY Platonic dialogue is a tangled web. The Sophist and the Statesman, in which the paradigm of weaving plays a central role, are especially complex in structure. In this paper, I shall look at the Statesman from a variety of perspectives, following distinct but connected threads in the web, and always heading toward, or with an eye upon, the myth of the reversed cosmos. It will be necessary for me to make a considerable number of small points and observations (...)
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  30. Dialectic of Eros and Myth of the Soul in Plato's Phaedrus.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2010 - Symbolae Osloenses 84 (84):73-90.
    In this paper, I question a widespread reading of a passage in the last part of the Phaedrus dealing with the science of dialectic. According to this reading, the passage announces a new method peculiar to the later Plato aiming at defining natural kinds. I show that the Phaedrus itself does not support such a reading. As an alternative reading, I suggest that the science of dialectic, as discussed in the passage, must be seen as dealing primarily with philosophical rhetoric (...)
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  31.  25
    Pedagogy in the Myth of Plato's "Statesman:" Body and Soul in Relation to Philosophy and Politics.Scott R. Hemmenway - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (3):253 - 268.
    Because the young Socrates has presuppositions typical of a mathematician about the independence of the mind from the body, he has to be led to a fuller appreciation of the human soul, i.e., embodied intelligence, in order to understand statesmanship. The Eleatic Stranger thus tells a myth about an age where men age backwards, are born out of the earth, and are cared for by shepherd/gods. This affords the opportunity to think quite radically about how the body shapes the (...)
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  32. Fraternite, Inegalite, la Parole de Dieu : Plato's Authoritarian Myth of Political Legitimation.Malcolm Schofield - 2008 - In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press.
  33.  59
    Plato’s Myth of the Noble Lie and the Predicaments of American Civic Education.Kerry Burch - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):111-125.
  34.  27
    The Myth in Plato’s Theory of Ideas.Victor W. Sease - 1970 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 1 (1/2):186-197.
  35.  20
    Plato's Myth of the Statesman, the Ambiguities of the Golden Age and of History.Pierre Vidal-Naquet - 1978 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 98:132-141.
  36.  35
    Dancing with the Gods: The Myth of the Chariot in Plato's Phaedrus.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (2):185-217.
  37.  35
    The Myth of Protagoras and Plato's Theory of Measurement.Oded Balaban - 1987 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):371 - 384.
  38.  8
    Claudia Baracchi’s Of Myth, Life and War in Plato’s Republic. [REVIEW]Drew A. Hyland - 2002 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 23 (2):203-206.
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  39.  18
    Claudia Baracchi’s Of Myth, Life and War in Plato’s Republic.Drew A. Hyland - 2002 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 23 (2):203-206.
  40. Plato’s Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2019 - Berlin, Niemcy: Peter Lang Academic Publishers.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of Plato’s conception of justice. The universality of human rights and the universality of human dignity, which is recognised as their source, are among the crucial philosophical problems in modern-day legal orders and in contemporary culture in general. If dignity is genuinely universal, then human beings also possessed it in ancient times. Plato not only perceived human dignity, but a recognition of dignity is also visible in his conception of justice, which forms the (...)
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  41. Platonic Approaches to Individual Sciences: Aristotelian Objections and Post-Aristotelian Responses to Plato's Elemental Theory / Ian Mueller. In Defence of Geometric Atomism : Explaining Elemental Properties / Jan Opsomer. Plato's Geography : Damascius' Interpretation of the Phaedo Myth / Carlos Steel. Neoplatonists on 'Spontaneous' Generation / James Wilberding. Aspects of Biology in Plotinus. [REVIEW]Christoph Horn - 2012 - In James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.), Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford Up.
     
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  42.  6
    The Function of the Myth in Plato's Philosophy.Ludwig Edelstein & The Editors - 1949 - Journal of the History of Ideas 10 (4):463.
  43.  17
    Colloquium 3: The Efficacy of Myth in Plato’s Republic.Jonathan Lear - 2004 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):35-56.
  44.  10
    The Myth of Cronus in Plato’s Statesman: Cosmic Rotation and Earthly Correspondence.Wellesley College Corinne GartnerCorresponding authorPhilosophy - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  45. Claudia Baracchi, Of Myth, Life, and War in Plato's Republic. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2002, 264 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-253-21485-8, $24.95 (Pb). Norman E. Bowie, The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing, 2002, 363 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-631-22123-9 (Hb). [REVIEW]Thomas M. Dickens & Rem B. Edwards - 2003 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36:137-139.
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  46. Plato's Theory of Myth.Gerald D. Stormer - 1974 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):216.
  47.  28
    The Myth of Plato’s Socratic Period.Lloyd Gerson - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (4):403-430.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 96 Heft: 4 Seiten: 403-430.
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  48. Of Myth, Life, and War in Plato’s Republic.Claudia Baracchi - 2002 - Utopian Studies 17 (1):258-261.
  49.  14
    What About Hermes?: A Reconsideration of the Myth of Prometheus in Plato’s Protagoras.Sergio Yona - 2015 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 108 (3):359-383.
  50.  29
    Review of Kevin Corrigan, Elena Glazov-Corrigan, Plato's Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in Plato's Symposium[REVIEW]David Konstan - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (5).
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