Results for 'Pratityasamutpada'

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  1. Pratityasamutpada in Eastern and Western Modes of Thought.Christian Thomas Kohl - 2012 - International Association of Buddhist Universities 4 (2012):68-80.
    Nagarjuna and Quantum physics. Eastern and Western Modes of Thought. Summary. The key terms. 1. Key term: ‘Emptiness’. The Indian philosopher Nagarjuna is known in the history of Buddhism mainly by his keyword ‘sunyata’. This word is translated into English by the word ‘emptiness’. The translation and the traditional interpretations create the impression that Nagarjuna declares the objects as empty or illusionary or not real or not existing. What is the assertion and concrete statement made by this interpretation? That nothing (...)
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    Nāgārjuna's Fundamental Doctrine of Pratītyasamutpāda.Ewing Chinn - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):54-72.
    Nāgārjuna contends that the doctrine of Pratītyasamutpāda (dependent origination), properly understood, constitutes the philosophical basis for the rejection and avoidance of all metaphysical theories and concepts (including causation). The companion doctrine of "śūnyatā" constitutes the denial of metaphysical realism (or "essentialism") but does not imply an anti-realist, conventionalist view of reality (as Jay Garfield maintains). "Pratītyasamutpāda," the true doctrine or, literally, "the exact or real nature of the case," is really two-sided: it is (1) a "causal" principle explaining the origin (...)
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  3.  37
    Christian and Buddhist Perspectives on Neuro Psychology and the Human Person: Pneuma and Pratityasamutpada.Amos Yong - 2005 - Zygon 40 (1):143-165.
    . Recent discussions of the mind‐brain and the soul‐body problems have been both advanced and complexified by the cognitive sciences. I focus explicitly here on emergence, supervenience, and nonreductive physicalist theories of human personhood in light of recent advances in the Christian‐Buddhist dialogue. While traditional self and no‐self views pitted Christianity versus Buddhism versus science, I show how the nonreductive physicalist proposal regarding human personhood emerging from the neuroscientific enterprise both contributes to and is enriched by the Christian concept of (...)
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  4.  12
    From Etymology to Ontology: Vasubandhu and Candrakīrti on Various Interpretations of Pratītyasamutpāda.Goran Kardas - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):293-317.
    The main body of this article presents Vasubandhu’s and Candrakīrti’s discussion on the etymology of pratītyasamutpāda and its meaning as it appears in the Bhāṣya to Abhidharmakośa 3.28ab and Prasannapadā 4.5–9.27, respectively. Both authors put forward and critically examine various Buddhist grammatical analyses and interpretations of the term. Many passages in the indicated sections parallel or nearly parallel to each other suggest that Buddhist discussions on pratītyasamutpāda were held in a very specified manner during the mature phase of Buddhist philosophy (...)
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    Nagarjuna's Fundamental Principle of Pratityasamutpada.Ewing Chinn - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):54-72.
    Nāgārjuna contends that the doctrine of Pratītyasamutpāda , properly understood, constitutes the philosophical basis for the rejection and avoidance of all metaphysical theories and concepts . The companion doctrine of "śūnyatā" constitutes the denial of metaphysical realism but does not imply an anti-realist, conventionalist view of reality . "Pratītyasamutpāda," the true doctrine or, literally, "the exact or real nature of the case," is really two-sided: it is a "causal" principle explaining the origin of all that exists, and a semantic principle (...)
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  6.  25
    Hegelian 'Absolute Idealism' with Yogācāra Buddhism on Consciousness, Concept ( Begriff ), and Co-Dependent Origination ( Pratītyasamutpāda ).Adam Scarfe - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):47-73.
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  7.  3
    Vasubandhus Interpretation des Pratītyasamutpāda: Eine kritische Bearbeitung der Pratītyasamutpādavyākhyā Vasubandhus Interpretation des Pratityasamutpada: Eine kritische Bearbeitung der Pratityasamutpadavyakhya.Paul J. Griffiths & Yoshihito G. Muroji - 1996 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (3):584.
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  8. Pratityasamutpada: Toward a Structuralist Analysis.Charlene Mcdermott - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (4):437.
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  9.  63
    A Sketch on Nāgārjuna's Perspectives on "Relation".Krishna Del Toso - 2016 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 57 (133):153-176.
    ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to provide a sketch on the way Nāgārjuna deals with the idea of 'relation'. The concept of 'relation' as expressed in the Pāli sources is here theoretically systematized according to three patterns: 1. logical, 2. strictly subordinative existential, 3. non-strictly subordinative existential. After having discussed Nāgārjuna's acceptance and treatment of these three patterns, particular attention is paid to the non-strictly subordinative existential relation. This kind of relation is meant to describe the way the (...)
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    Causality--The Central Philosophy of Buddhism.David J. Kalupahana - 1975 - University Press of Hawaii.
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  11. Dependent-Arising and Emptiness: A Tibetan Buddhist Interpretation of Mādhyamika Philosophy Emphasizing the Compatibility of Emptiness and Conventional Phenomena.Elizabeth Napper - 1989 - Wisdom Publications.
  12.  38
    Freedom with a Buddhist Face.Daniel Breyer - 2013 - Sophia 52 (2):359-379.
    This article clarifies the Buddhist position on freedom and responsibility, while arguing for three central claims. The first is that it is an open question whether Buddhists endorse causal determinism or causal indeterminism. The second claim is that the most promising contemporary interpretations of the Buddhist view fail in important respects. The final claim is that the best interpretation of the Buddhist position on freedom and responsibility is Buddhist Perspectivalism, the view that we should view ourselves as genuinely free and (...)
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  13.  59
    Acquiring Emptiness: Interpreting Nāgārjuna's Mmk 24:18.Douglas L. Berger - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 40-64.
    A pivotal focus of exegesis of Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārïkā (MMK) for the past half century has been the attempt to decipher the text's philosophy of language, and determine how this best aids us in characterizing Madhyamaka thought as a whole. In this vein, MMK 24:18 has been judged of particular weight insofar as it purportedly insists that the concepts pratītyasamutpāda (conditioned co-arising) and śūnyatā (emptiness), both indispensable to Buddhist praxis, are themselves only "nominal" or "conventional," that is, they are merely labels (...)
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    The Meaning of Vairocana in Hua-Yen Buddhism.Francis H. Cook - 1972 - Philosophy East and West 22 (4):403-415.
    Is vairocana, The buddha who is the object of veneration in the chinese hua-Yen school of buddhism, To be construed as a substance or spirit in phenomenal objects? an examination of the writings of fa-Tsang, Founder of the school, Reveals that he understood vairocana to be nothing other than the name given to the mode of existence of phenomenal reality. This mode, In buddhism, Is that of complete interdependence, Or intercausality. Vairocana is the interdependent existence of the universe, Or dharma-Dhatu (...)
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    Upādāyaprajñaptiḥ and the Meaning of Absolutives: Grammar and Syntax in the Interpretation of Madhyamaka. [REVIEW]Mattia Salvini - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (3):229-244.
    The article discusses the relevance of the syntactical implications of the absolutive ending (lyabanta) in interpreting the Madhyamaka term upādāyaprajñapti, and hence Mūlamadhyamakakārikā 18.24. The views of both Sanskrit and Pāli classical grammarians are taken into account, and a comparison is made between some contemporary English translations of MMK 18.24 as against Candrakīrti’s commentary. The conclusion suggests that Candrakīrti is grammatically accurate and perceptive, that he may have been aware of the tradition of Candragomin’s grammar, and that the structural analogy (...)
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  16. Het begrip Dharma in het indische denken.J. Gonda - 1958 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 20 (2):213-268.
    Translations into a modern Western language can hardly by expected to give a correct idea of the contents of the most important dharma idea in Indian culture. « Law, moral and religious duties, rule, norm, truth etc. etc. » are, like « element, category » only aspects of a concept for which our languages have no word because it is foreign to our „ philosophy” and „Weltanschauung”. The term obviously derives from the root dharor dhr-which is also the basis of (...)
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  17. Ethics of Ambiguity : A Buddhist Reflection on the Japanese Organ Transplant Law.Ronald Y. Nakasone - 2006 - In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter examines the structure and role of ambiguity in the Japanese Organ Transplant Law by looking at the Chinese Huayen Buddhist doctrine of dharmadhatu-pratityasamutpada or universal dependent “coarising”, a major interpretation of the Buddha's pratityasamutpada, dependent-coarising or interdependence. Specifically, it will examine the nature of ambiguity through the zhuban yuanming jude men or “the attribute of the complete accommodation of principal and secondary dharmas” that Fazang formulated. The interdependent and evolving Buddhist vision of reality causes ambiguity in (...)
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