Results for 'Privacy'

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  1. The nature and value of the.Moral Right To Privacy - 2002 - Public Affairs Quarterly 16 (4):329.
     
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  2.  15
    Data privacy protection in scientific publications: process implementation at a pharmaceutical company.Friedrich Maritsch, Ingeborg Cil, Colin McKinnon, Jesse Potash, Nicole Baumgartner, Valérie Philippon & Borislava G. Pavlova - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-10.
    Background Sharing anonymized/de-identified clinical trial data and publishing research outcomes in scientific journals, or presenting them at conferences, is key to data-driven scientific exchange. However, when data from scientific publications are linked to other publicly available personal information, the risk of reidentification of trial participants increases, raising privacy concerns. Therefore, we defined a set of criteria allowing us to determine and minimize the risk of data reidentification. We also implemented a review process at Takeda for clinical publications prior to (...)
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  3. Chapter outline.A. Myth Versus Reality, D. Publicity not Privacy, E. Guilty Until Proven Innocent, J. Change & Rotation Mentality - forthcoming - Moral Management: Business Ethics.
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  4.  51
    Digital Contact Tracing, Privacy, and Public Health.Nicole Martinez-Martin, Sarah Wieten, David Magnus & Mildred K. Cho - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):43-46.
    Digital contact tracing, in combination with widespread testing, has been a focal point for many plans to “reopen” economies while containing the spread of Covid‐19. Most digital contact tracing projects in the United States and Europe have prioritized privacy protections in the form of local storage of data on smartphones and the deidentification of information. However, in the prioritization of privacy in this narrow form, there is not sufficient attention given to weighing ethical trade‐offs within the context of (...)
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  5.  61
    Diminished or Just Different? A Factorial Vignette Study of Privacy as a Social Contract.Kirsten E. Martin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):519-539.
    A growing body of theory has focused on privacy as being contextually defined, where individuals have highly particularized judgments about the appropriateness of what, why, how, and to whom information flows within a specific context. Such a social contract understanding of privacy could produce more practical guidance for organizations and managers who have employees, users, and future customers all with possibly different conceptions of privacy across contexts. However, this theoretical suggestion, while intuitively appealing, has not been empirically (...)
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  6. The Convergence of Virtual Reality and Social Networks: Threats to Privacy and Autonomy.Fiachra O’Brolcháin, Tim Jacquemard, David Monaghan, Noel O’Connor, Peter Novitzky & Bert Gordijn - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):1-29.
    The rapid evolution of information, communication and entertainment technologies will transform the lives of citizens and ultimately transform society. This paper focuses on ethical issues associated with the likely convergence of virtual realities and social networks, hereafter VRSNs. We examine a scenario in which a significant segment of the world’s population has a presence in a VRSN. Given the pace of technological development and the popularity of these new forms of social interaction, this scenario is plausible. However, it brings with (...)
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  7.  20
    A Hegelian Basis for Privacy as an Economic Right.Martyn Prigmore Marco De Boni - 2004 - Contemporary Political Theory 3 (2):168.
    The role of information systems and technology in stimulating interest in privacy is discussed, with an emphasis on the move towards regarding privacy as an economic right. Current proposals are shown to derive from pragmatic, problem-driven analyses, rather than clear philosophical foundations: they are therefore inflexible and limited in scope, and advances in technology are likely to render them obsolete. The need for a clear philosophical basis for privacy as an economic rather than a social/human right is (...)
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  8.  56
    Rationality and the right to privacy.Mark Alfino & G. Randolph Mayes - 2001 - In Daniel A. Bonevac (ed.), Today's moral issues: classic and contemporary perspectives. Boston: McGraw Hill.
    When tennis fan Jane Bronstein attended the 1995 U.S. Open she probably knew there was a remote chance her image would end up on television screens around the world. But she surely did not know she was at risk of becoming the object of worldwide attention on the David Letterman Show. As it happened, Letterman spotted an unflattering clip from the U.S. Open showing a heavyset Bronstein with peach juice dripping down her chin. Not only did he show the footage (...)
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  9. Mental Privacy, Cognitive Liberty, and Hog-tying.Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-16.
    As the science and technology of the brain and mind develop, so do the ways in which brains and minds may be surveilled and manipulated. Some cognitive libertarians worry that these developments undermine cognitive liberty, or “freedom of thought.” I argue that protecting an individual’s cognitive liberty undermines others’ ability to use their own cognitive liberty. Given that the threatening devices and processes are not relevantly different from ordinary and frequent intrusions upon one’s brain and mind, strong protections of cognitive (...)
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  10.  39
    Do online privacy policies and seals affect corporate trustworthiness and reputation?Yohko Orito, Kiyoshi Murata & Yasunori Fukuta - 2013 - International Review of Information Ethics 19:52-65.
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  11.  28
    Technology and Ethics: Privacy in the Workplace.Laura P. Hartman - 2001 - Business and Society Review 106 (1):1-27.
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  12.  19
    The Balance Between Employee Privacy And Employer Interests.Dr Kenneth A. Kovach, Jennifer Jordan, Karens Tansey & Eve Framiñan - 2000 - Business and Society Review 105 (2):289-298.
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  13. Theoretical conceptualization of online privacy-related decision making – Introducing the tripartite self-disclosure decision model.Sina Ostendorf & Matthias Brand - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Self-disclosures on online social networks have received increased attention in the last two decades. Researchers from different disciplines investigated manifold influencing variables, and studies applied different theories to explain why many users share very sensitive and personal information despite potential risks and negative consequences, whereas others do not. Oftentimes, it is argued that self-disclosure decisions result from a kind of rational “calculus” of risks and benefits. However, such an assumption of rationality can and has been criticized. Nevertheless, fundamental cognitive and (...)
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  14.  19
    Biometric cards: privacy invaders vs. a safer America.Amanda Woodcock - 2005 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 35 (1):3-3.
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  15.  36
    Ethics across the computer science curriculum: Privacy modules in an introductory database course.Florence Appel - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):635-644.
    This paper describes the author’s experience of infusing an introductory database course with privacy content, and the on-going project entitled Integrating Ethics Into the Database Curriculum, that evolved from that experience. The project, which has received funding from the National Science Foundation, involves the creation of a set of privacy modules that can be implemented systematically by database educators throughout the database design thread of an undergraduate course.
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  16.  13
    Recent Amendments to the Australian Privacy Act.Minna Paltiel - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (2):161-167.
    The recently passed Privacy Legislation Amendment (Enforcement and Other Measures) Act 2022 (Cth) introduced important changes to the Australian Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) which increase penalties for serious and repeated interferences with privacy and strengthen the investigative and enforcement powers of the Information Commissioner. The amendments were made subsequent to a number of high profile data breaches and represent the first set of changes to the Privacy Act following the review of the Act commenced by the (...)
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  17.  17
    Panel Comment: Legislating Privacy: The HIV Experience.Wendy E. Parmet - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (4):371-374.
  18. The right to privacy.Colleen Angel - 2000 - Journal of Information Ethics 9 (2):11-25.
     
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  19. The value of privacy.David Archard - unknown
  20. Case study concerning privacy in the care of patients with HIV.Atsushi Asai & Kenji Miki - 2013 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 23 (1):13-16.
     
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  21.  4
    Research in the Biotech Age: Can Informational Privacy Compete?Wilhelm Peekhaus - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (1):48-59.
    This article examines the privacy of personal medical information in the health research context. Arguing that biomedical research in Canada has been caught up in the government's broader neoliberal policy agenda that has positioned biotechnology as a strategic driver of economic growth, the author discusses the tension between informational privacy and the need for medical information for research purposes. Consideration is given to the debate about whether privacy for medical information serves or hinders the “public good” in (...)
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  22. Chances of Privacy and Trust within the Development of Ubiquitous Computing.J. Heesen & O. Siemoneit - 2007 - International Review of Information Ethics 8.
     
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  23. The right to privacy in secondary school : ideas of adolescents.Mariela Helman, Axel Horn & José Antonio Castorina - 2023 - In José Antonio Castorina & Alicia Barreiro (eds.), The development of social knowledge: towards a cultural-individual dialectic. Charlotte, NC: IAP, Information Age Publishing.
     
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  24. The right to privacy.Paul Kurtz - 2007 - In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books. pp. 119.
     
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  25.  31
    " I am Spartacus"–privacy enhancing technologies and privacy as a public good.Zbigniew Kwecka, William J. Buchanan & Burkhard Schafer - forthcoming - Artificial Intelligence and Law.
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  26.  37
    Privacy Is Power.Carissa Véliz - 2020 - London, UK: Penguin (Bantam Press).
    Selected by the Economist as one of the best books of 2020. -/- Privacy Is Power argues that people should protect their personal data because privacy is a kind of power. If we give too much of our data to corporations, the wealthy will rule. If we give too much personal data to governments, we risk sliding into authoritarianism. For democracy to be strong, the bulk of power needs to be with the citizenry, and whoever has the data (...)
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  27.  65
    Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?Anita Allen - 2011 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Can the government stick us with privacy we don't want? It can, it does, and according to this author, may need to do more of it. Privacy is a foundational good, she argues, a necessary tool in the liberty-lover's kit for a successful life. A nation committed to personal freedom must be prepared to mandate inalienable, liberty-promoting privacies for its people, whether they eagerly embrace them or not. The eight chapters of this book are reflections on public regulation (...)
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  28.  27
    Annabelle Lever, On Privacy, Routledge: New York and London, 2012, 100 pp., €16.50 (US$ 22.95) (Paperback), ISBN 9780415395700. [REVIEW]Marc-André Weber - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (4):618-621.
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  29. Privacy, Autonomy, and Personalised targeting: Rethinking How Personal Data is Used.Karina Vold & Jessica Whittlestone - 2020 - In Carissa Veliz (ed.), Report on Data, Privacy, and the Individual in the Digital Age.
    Technological advances are bringing new light to privacy issues and changing the reasons for why privacy is important. These advances have changed not only the kind of personal data that is available to be collected, but also how that personal data can be used by those who have access to it. We are particularly concerned with how information about personal attributes inferred from collected data (such as online behaviour), can be used to tailor messages and services to specific (...)
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  30. Data, Privacy, and the Individual.Carissa Véliz - 2020 - Center for the Governance of Change.
    The first few years of the 21st century were characterised by a progressive loss of privacy. Two phenomena converged to give rise to the data economy: the realisation that data trails from users interacting with technology could be used to develop personalised advertising, and a concern for security that led authorities to use such personal data for the purposes of intelligence and policing. In contrast to the early days of the data economy and internet surveillance, the last few years (...)
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  31.  53
    The privacy of the psychical.Amihud Gilead - 2011 - Amsterdam: Rodopi.
    This book argues that the irreducible singularity of each person as a psychical subject implies the privacy of the psychical and that of experience, and yet the private accessibility of each person to his or her mind is compatible with interpersonal communication and understanding. The book treats these major issues against the background of the author's original metaphysics--panenmentalism."--Publisher's website.
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  32. Between Privacy and Utility: On Differential Privacy in Theory and Practice.Jeremy Seeman & Daniel Susser - 2023 - Acm Journal on Responsible Computing 1 (1):1-18.
    Differential privacy (DP) aims to confer data processing systems with inherent privacy guarantees, offering strong protections for personal data. But DP’s approach to privacy carries with it certain assumptions about how mathematical abstractions will be translated into real-world systems, which—if left unexamined and unrealized in practice—could function to shield data collectors from liability and criticism, rather than substantively protect data subjects from privacy harms. This article investigates these assumptions and discusses their implications for using DP to (...)
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  33. Information Privacy and Social Self-Authorship.Daniel Susser - 2016 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 20 (3):216-239.
    The dominant approach in privacy theory defines information privacy as some form of control over personal information. In this essay, I argue that the control approach is mistaken, but for different reasons than those offered by its other critics. I claim that information privacy involves the drawing of epistemic boundaries—boundaries between what others should and shouldn’t know about us. While controlling what information others have about us is one strategy we use to draw such boundaries, it is (...)
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  34.  8
    Book Review: Patients’ autonomy, privacy and informed consent. [REVIEW]Jay Woogara - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (2):166-167.
  35. Brain Privacy and the Case of Cannibal Cop.Mark Tunick - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (2):179-196.
    In light of technology that may reveal the content of a person’s innermost thoughts, I address the question of whether there is a right to ‘brain privacy’—a right not to have one’s inner thoughts revealed to others–even if exposing these thoughts might be beneficial to society. I draw on a conception of privacy as the ability to control who has access to information about oneself and to an account that connects one’s interest in privacy to one’s interests (...)
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  36. Privacy, Separation, and Control.Steve Matthews - 2008 - The Monist 91 (1):130-150.
    Defining privacy is problematic because the condition of privacy appears simultaneously to require separation from others, and the possibility of choosing not to be separate. This latter feature expresses the inherent normative dimension of privacy: the capacity to control the perceptual and informational spaces surrounding one’s person. Clearly the features of separation and control as just described are in tension because one may easily enough choose to give up all barriers between oneself and the public space. How (...)
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  37.  37
    Patients' privacy and satisfaction in the emergency department: a descriptive analytical study.N. D. Nayeri & M. Aghajani - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):167-177.
    Respecting privacy and patients’ satisfaction are amongst the main indicators of quality of care and one of the basic goals of health services. This study, carried out in 2007, aimed to investigate the extent to which patient privacy is observed and its correlation with patient satisfaction in three emergency departments of Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran. Questionnaire data were collected from a convenience sample of 360 patients admitted to emergency departments and analysed using SPSS software. The results (...)
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  38.  9
    Privacy, due process and the computational turn.Mireille Hildebrandt & Katja de Vries (eds.) - 2013 - Abingdon, Oxon, [England] ; New York: Routledge.
    Privacy, Due process and the Computational Turn: The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology engages with the rapidly developing computational aspects of our world including data mining, behavioural advertising, iGovernment, profiling for intelligence, customer relationship management, smart search engines, personalized news feeds, and so on in order to consider their implications for the assumptions on which our legal framework has been built. The contributions to this volume focus on the issue of privacy, which is often equated (...)
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  39. Privacy Rights and Public Information.Benedict Rumbold & James Wilson - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (1):3-25.
    This article concerns the nature and limits of individuals’ rights to privacy over information that they have made public. For some, even suggesting that an individual can have a right to privacy over such information may seem paradoxical. First, one has no right to privacy over information that was never private to begin with. Second, insofar as one makes once-private information public – whether intentionally or unintentionally – one waives one’s right to privacy to that information. (...)
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  40. Privacy, the workplace and the internet.Seumas Miller & John Weckert - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):255 - 265.
    This paper examines workplace surveillance and monitoring. It is argued that privacy is a moral right, and while such surveillance and monitoring can be justified in some circumstances, there is a presumption against the infringement of privacy. An account of privacy precedes consideration of various arguments frequently given for the surveillance and monitoring of employees, arguments which look at the benefits, or supposed benefits, to employees as well as to employers. The paper examines the general monitoring of (...)
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  41. Privacy in Public: A Democratic Defense.Titus Stahl - 2020 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 7 (1):73-96.
    Traditional arguments for privacy in public suggest that intentionally public activities, such as political speech, do not deserve privacy protection. In this article, I develop a new argument for the view that surveillance of intentionally public activities should be limited to protect the specific good that this context provides, namely democratic legitimacy. Combining insights from Helen Nissenbaum’s contextualism and Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, I argue that strategic surveillance of the public sphere can undermine the capacity (...)
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  42. Privacy.Edmund Byrne - 1998 - In Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 649-659.
    Privacy involves a zone of inaccessibility in a particular context. In social discourse it pertains to activities that are not public, the latter being by definition knowable by outsiders. The public domain so called is the opposite of secrecy and somewhat less so of confidentiality. The private sphere is respected in law and morality, now in terms of a right to privacy. In law some violations of privacy are torts. Philosophers tend to associate privacy with personhood. (...)
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  43. privacy and democracy: what the secret ballot reveals.Annabelle Lever - 2015 - Law, Culture and the Humanities 11 (2).
    : Does the rejection of pure proceduralism show that we should adopt Brettschneider’s value theory of democracy? The answer, this paper suggests, is ‘no’. There are a potentially infinite number of incompatible ways to understand democracy, of which the value theory is, at best, only one. The paper illustrates and substantiates its claims by looking at what the secret ballot shows us about the importance of privacy and democracy. Drawing on the reasons to reject Mill’s arguments for open voting, (...)
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  44. Privacy, Intimacy, and Isolation.Julie C. Inness - 1992 - New York, US: OUP Usa.
    From the Supreme Court to the bedroom, privacy is an intensely contested interest in our everyday lives and privacy law. Some people appeal to privacy to protect such critical areas as abortion, sexuality, and personal information. Yet, privacy skeptics argue that there is no such thing as a right to privacy. I argue that we cannot abandon the concept of privacy. If we wish to avoid extending this elusive concept to cover too much of (...)
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  45.  90
    Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms.Graeme Laurie - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in (...)
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  46. Brain Data in Context: Are New Rights the Way to Mental and Brain Privacy?Daniel Susser & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):122-133.
    The potential to collect brain data more directly, with higher resolution, and in greater amounts has heightened worries about mental and brain privacy. In order to manage the risks to individuals posed by these privacy challenges, some have suggested codifying new privacy rights, including a right to “mental privacy.” In this paper, we consider these arguments and conclude that while neurotechnologies do raise significant privacy concerns, such concerns are—at least for now—no different from those raised (...)
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  47. Group privacy: a defence and an interpretation.Luciano Floridi - 2016 - In Bart van der Sloot, Luciano Floridi & Linnet Taylor (eds.), Group privacy. Springer Verlag.
    In this chapter I identify three problems affecting the plausibility of group privacy and argue in favour of their resolution. The first problem concerns the nature of the groups in question. I shall argue that groups are neither discovered nor invented, but designed by the level of abstraction (LoA) at which a specific analysis of a social system is developed. Their design is therefore justified insofar as the purpose, guiding the choice of the LoA, is justified. This should remove (...)
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  48. Student Privacy in Learning Analytics: An Information Ethics Perspective.Alan Rubel & Kyle M. L. Jones - 2016 - The Information Society 32 (2):143-159.
    In recent years, educational institutions have started using the tools of commercial data analytics in higher education. By gathering information about students as they navigate campus information systems, learning analytics “uses analytic techniques to help target instructional, curricular, and support resources” to examine student learning behaviors and change students’ learning environments. As a result, the information educators and educational institutions have at their disposal is no longer demarcated by course content and assessments, and old boundaries between information used for assessment (...)
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  49.  5
    Privacy.William A. Edmundson - 2004 - In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 271–283.
    This chapter contains section titled: Dimensions of Privacy Theories of Privacy Liberty and Decisional Privacy Justifying a Right to Informational Privacy Secrecy and Authority Note References.
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  50.  54
    On Privacy.Annabelle Lever - 2011 - Routledge.
    This book explores the Janus-faced features of privacy, and looks at their implications for the control of personal information, for sexual and reproductive freedom, and for democratic politics. It asks what, if anything, is wrong with asking women to get licenses in order to have children, given that pregnancy and childbirth can seriously damage your health. It considers whether employers should be able to monitor the friendships and financial affairs of employees, and whether we are entitled to know whenever (...)
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