Results for 'Professional norms'

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  1.  13
    Professional Norms.Wade Robison - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):185-194.
    It is unfortunate that it is all too easy to find examples of professional misconduct. Professionals are distinguished from the rest of us, and from each other, by learning the special skills and knowledge essential to the practice of their profession, by coming to think in different and distinct ways, and by taking on a special set of moral relations, including furthering the social purpose for which the state recognizes the profession. A professional can thus go wrong in (...)
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  2.  28
    Inadequate Treatment for Elderly Patients: Professional Norms and Tight Budgets Could Cause “Ageism” in Hospitals.Helge Skirbekk & Per Nortvedt - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):192-201.
    We have studied ethical considerations of care among health professionals when treating and setting priorities for elderly patients in Norway. The views of medical doctors and nurses were analysed using qualitative methods. We conducted 21 in depth interviews and 3 focus group interviews in hospitals and general practices. Both doctors and nurses said they treated elderly patients different from younger patients, and often they were given lower priorities. Too little or too much treatment, in the sense of too many interventions (...)
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  3.  14
    Professional Norms and Physician Attitudes Toward Euthanasia.Thomas A. Preston - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (1):36-40.
    The chair of the ethics committee of a major medical center agonized over how he, as a physician, and his organization should deal with Initiative 119, which, if passed, would legalize physician involvement in active, voluntary euthanasia in Washington State. In the end, he said, he could not vote for aid-in-dying because, “However much I want to reduce suffering, I myself just couldn’t do it to one of my patients.” He spoke of a personal distaste for the potential act, of (...)
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  4.  8
    Professional Norms and Physician Attitudes Toward Euthanasia.Thomas A. Preston - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (1):36-40.
    The chair of the ethics committee of a major medical center agonized over how he, as a physician, and his organization should deal with Initiative 119, which, if passed, would legalize physician involvement in active, voluntary euthanasia in Washington State. In the end, he said, he could not vote for aid-in-dying because, “However much I want to reduce suffering, I myself just couldn’t do it to one of my patients.” He spoke of a personal distaste for the potential act, of (...)
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  5.  20
    Professional Norms in Advance.Wade Robison - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
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  6.  32
    Putting Patient Autonomy in its Proper Place; Professional Norm-Guided Medical Decision-Making.Thomas Huddle - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (4):457-482.
    Since patient autonomy became a prominent theme in medical ethics in the 1970s and 1980s, it has had a troubled reputation among many physicians, to whom claims for its importance in medical decision making seem unrealistic and even undesirable. Of course the discussion has moved on since the early days in which informative or interpretive models of medical decision-making—in which physicians provided information and helped patients clarify and express preferences that then determined decisions—were contrasted with usual medical practice characterized as (...)
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  7.  57
    Professional Autonomy and the Normative Structure of Medical Practice.Jan Hoogland & Henk Jochemsen - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):457-475.
    Professional autonomy is often described as a claim of professionalsthat has to serve primarily their own interests. However, it can also beseen as an element of a professional ideal that can function as astandard for professional, i.e. medical practice. This normativeunderstanding of the medical profession and professional autonomy facesthree threats today. 1) Internal erosion of professional autonomy due toa lack of internal quality control by the medical profession; 2)the increasing upward pressure on health care expenses (...)
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  8.  2
    17. The Challenge of Professional Norms to Ethics.Guillaume de Stexhe - 2000 - In Guillaume de Stexhe & Johan Verstraeten (eds.), Matter of Breath: Foundations for Professional Ethics. Peeters. pp. 275.
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  9.  50
    Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners.Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):333-345.
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women’s prisons (...)
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  10.  21
    Marketers' Norms and Personal Values: An Empirical Study of Marketing Professionals. [REVIEW]Kumar C. Rallapalli, Scott J. Vitell & Sheryl Szeinbach - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):65 - 75.
    This study explores the relationships among marketers' deontological norms and their personal values. Based on the review of theoretical works in the area of marketing, hypotheses concerning the relationships among marketers' norms and their personal values were developed and tested. Data were collected from 249 marketing professionals. Results from canonical correlation analysis generally indicate that marketers' norms can be partly explained by personal values. Marketers' pricing and distribution norms, information and contract norms, and norms (...)
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  11. Prenatal Care for Undocumented Immigrants: Professional Norms, Ethical Tensions, and Practical Workarounds.Rachel E. Fabi & Holly A. Taylor - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (3):398-408.
    This paper examines the practice implications of various state policies that provide publicly funded prenatal care to undocumented immigrants for health care workers who see undocumented patients. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with purposively sampled health care workers at safety net clinics in California, Maryland, Nebraska, and New York. Health care workers were asked about the process through which undocumented patients receive prenatal care in their health center and the ethical tensions and frustrations they encounter when providing or facilitating (...)
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  12.  32
    Professional Values and Norms for Nurses in Belgium.Ellen Verpeet, Tom Meulenbergs & Chris Gastmans - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (6):654-665.
    Because of their responsibilities for providing high-quality care, at times when they are continuously confronted with inherent professional and ethical challenges, nurses should meet high ethical standards of practice and conduct. Contrary to other countries, where codes of ethics for nurses are formulated to support those standards and to guide nurses’ professional practice, Belgian nurses do not have a formal code of ethics. Nevertheless, professional ethics is recognized as an important aspect in legal and other professional (...)
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  13.  15
    Staff’s Normative Attitudes Towards Coercion: The Role of Moral Doubt and Professional Context—a Cross-Sectional Survey Study.Bert Molewijk, Almar Kok, Tonje Husum, Reidar Pedersen & Olaf Aasland - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):37.
    The use of coercion is morally problematic and requires an ongoing critical reflection. We wondered if not knowing or being uncertain whether coercion is morally right or justified is related to professionals’ normative attitudes regarding the use of coercion. This paper describes an explorative statistical analysis based on a cross-sectional survey across seven wards in three Norwegian mental health care institutions. Descriptive analyses showed that in general the 379 respondents a) were not so sure whether coercion should be seen as (...)
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  14.  6
    Personal Injury: Plaintiffs' Lawyers and the Tension Between Professional Norms and the Need to Generate Business.Stephen Daniels & Joanne Martin - 2012 - In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. University of Chicago Press. pp. 110.
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  15.  14
    Do Conflicts of Interest Create a New Professional Norm? Physical Therapists and Workers' Compensation.Maude Laliberté & Anne Hudon - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):26 - 28.
  16.  18
    The Normative Impact of CPA Firms, Professional Organizations, and State Boards on Accounting Ethics Education.Kevin M. Misiewicz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):15 - 21.
    Accounting educators are in the midst of creating new opportunities for students to enhance their abilities to recognize ethical dilemmas, establish criteria by which to make ethical decisions, and establish support mechanisms and strategies to facilitate their ethical decision-making. CPA firms, professional organizations and state boards of accountancy are co-operating to increase requirements for ethics education for candidates taking the CPA exam. The current situation is confusing and sub-optimal regarding the use of precious learning time in college programs. A (...)
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  17.  8
    The Normative Impact of CPA Firms, Professional Organizations, and State Boards on Accounting Ethics Education.Kevin M. Misiewicz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):15-21.
    Accounting educators are in the midst of creating new opportunities for students to enhance their abilities to recognize ethical dilemmas, establish criteria by which to make ethical decisions, and establish support mechanisms and strategies to facilitate their ethical decision-making. CPA firms, professional organizations and state boards of accountancy are co-operating to increase requirements for ethics education for candidates taking the CPA exam. The current situation is confusing and sub-optimal regarding the use of precious learning time in college programs. A (...)
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  18.  9
    Professional Judgment and Justice: Equal Respect for the Professional Judgment of Critical-Care Physicians.David Magnus & Norm Rizk - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):1-2.
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  19.  53
    A Critical Examination of the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct.Allison Collins & Norm Schultz - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (1):31 - 41.
    The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) is responsible for the Code of Professional Conduct that governs the actions of CPAs. In 1988, the Code was revised by the AICPA, but a number of issues still remain unresolved or confounded by the new Code. These issues are examined in light of the profession''s stated commitment to the public good, a commitment that is discussed at length in the new Code.Specifically, this paper reviews the following issues: (1) client confidentiality (...)
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  20.  1
    Lies, Rebukes and Social Norms: On the Unspeakable in Interactions with Health-Care Professionals.Annie Bergeron, Marty Laforest & Diane Vincent - 2007 - Discourse Studies 9 (2):226-245.
    Reflecting upon the lies that are tied to rebukes is a fundamental step in the analysis of interactions between health-care professionals and their clients. Our research focuses on questions that incite people to lie, namely, those for which a lying response avoids a rebuke or a judgment based on some type of behaviour. Our objectives are: 1) to characterize the `question/response' exchange that is interpreted as a `potential rebuke/ lie' exchange, and the questions that may induce lying; 2) to identify (...)
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  21.  20
    Professional Work as an Ethical Norm.T. V. Smith - 1925 - Journal of Philosophy 22 (14):365-372.
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  22. Professional Codes: Why, How, and with What Impact? [REVIEW]Mark S. Frankel - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):109 - 115.
    A tension between the professions' pursuit of autonomy and the public's demand for accountability has led to the development of codes of ethics as both a foundation and guide for professional conduct in the face of morally ambiguous situations. The profession as an institution serves as a normative reference group for individual practitioners and through a code of ethics clarifies, for both its members and outsiders, the norms that ought to govern professional behavior. Three types of codes (...)
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  23. The Normative Theories of Business Ethics: A Guide for the Perplexed.John Hasnas - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):19-42.
    The three leading normative theories of business ethics are the stockholder theory, the stakeholder theory, and the social contracttheory. Currently, the stockholder theory is somewhat out of favor with many members of the business ethics community. Thestakeholder theory, in contrast, is widely accepted, and the social contract theory appears to be gaining increasing adherents. In thisarticle, I undertake a critical review of the supporting arguments for each of the theories, and argue that the stockholder theory is neitheras outdated nor as (...)
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  24. The Normative Theories of Business Ethics: A Guide for the Perplexed.John Hasnas - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):19-42.
    The three leading normative theories of business ethics are the stockholder theory, the stakeholder theory, and the social contracttheory. Currently, the stockholder theory is somewhat out of favor with many members of the business ethics community. Thestakeholder theory, in contrast, is widely accepted, and the social contract theory appears to be gaining increasing adherents. In thisarticle, I undertake a critical review of the supporting arguments for each of the theories, and argue that the stockholder theory is neitheras outdated nor as (...)
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  25.  40
    'Missile Strike Carried Out With Yemeni Cooperation'—Using UCAVs to Kill Alleged Terrorists: A Professional Approach to the Normative Bases of Military Ethics.Diederik Kolff - 2003 - Journal of Military Ethics 2 (3):240-244.
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  26.  49
    Normative and Empirical Business Ethics.Linda Klebe Trevino - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):129-143.
    This paper outlines three conceptions of the relationship between normative and empirical business ethics, views we refer to as parallel, symbiotic, and integrative. Parallelism rejects efforts to link normative and empirical inquiry, for both conceptual and practical reasons. The symbiotic position supports a practical relationship in which normative and/or empirical business ethics rely on each other for guidance in setting agenda or in applying the results of their conceptually and methodologically distinct inquiries. Theoretical integration countenances a deeper merging of prima (...)
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  27.  8
    Buddhist Teen Worldview: Some Normative Background for Health Professionals.Phra Nicholas Thanissaro & Sriya Kulupana - 2015 - Contemporary Buddhism 16 (1):28-42.
    Although there are dangers in essentializing religious practice, to be able to typify the worldviews of healthy Buddhists becomes advantageous when health professionals need to recognize atypical worldviews that are potentially pathological. The paper is an anthology of potentially ambiguous claims expressed by healthy Buddhist teenagers during UK research including outlook on karma, rebirth, meditation, mindfulness, contact with spirit presences, renunciation, spiritual teachers and superstition. The testimony helps clarify diagnosis of identity, well-being and conformity issues, social withdrawal, anxiety and psychotic (...)
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  28.  2
    Staff’s Normative Attitudes Towards Coercion: The Role of Moral Doubt and Professional Context—a Cross-Sectional Survey Study.Almar Kok Bert Molewijk, Reidar Pedersen Tonje Husum & Olaf Aasland - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    The use of coercion is morally problematic and requires an ongoing critical reflection. We wondered if not knowing or being uncertain whether coercion is morally right or justified (i.e. experiencing moral dou...
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  29. Moral Normative Force and Clinical Ethics Expertise.Parker Crutchfield - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):89-91.
    Brummett and Salter propose a useful and timely taxonomy of clinical ethics expertise (2019). As the field becomes further “professionalized” this taxonomy is important, and the core of it is right. It needs some refinement around the edges, however. In their conclusion, Brummett and Salter rightly point out that there is a significant difference between the ethicist whose recommendations are procedure- and process-heavy, consensus-driven, and dialogical and the authoritarian ethicist whose recommendations flow from “private moral views” (Brummett and Salter, 2019). (...)
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  30.  34
    Nurses as Guests or Professionals in Home Health Care.Stina Öresland, Sylvia Määttä, Astrid Norberg, Marianne Winther Jörgensen & Kim Lützén - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (3):371-383.
    The aim of this study was to explore and interpret the diverse subject of positions, or roles, that nurses construct when caring for patients in their own home. Ten interviews were analysed and interpreted using discourse analysis. The findings show that these nurses working in home care constructed two positions: `guest' and `professional'. They had to make a choice between these positions because it was impossible to be both at the same time. An ethics of care and an ethics (...)
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  31.  57
    The Authority of Professional Roles.Andreas Eriksen - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (3):373-391.
    Are professional roles bound by the norms of ordinary morality? This article begins with a discussion of two existing models that give contrary answers to this question; the practice model detaches professional ethics from ordinary morality, while the translation model denies any real divergence. It is argued that neither model can give a satisfying account of how professional roles ground distinct claims that are morally authoritative. The promise model is articulated and defended, wherein the obligations of (...)
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  32.  50
    Implicit Bias in Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.Chloë FitzGerald & Samia Hurst - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):19.
    Implicit biases involve associations outside conscious awareness that lead to a negative evaluation of a person on the basis of irrelevant characteristics such as race or gender. This review examines the evidence that healthcare professionals display implicit biases towards patients. PubMed, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLE and CINAHL were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st March 2003 and 31st March 2013. Two reviewers assessed the eligibility of the identified papers based on precise content and quality criteria. The references of eligible papers were (...)
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  33.  35
    Professional Ethics and Collective Professional Autonomy A Conceptual Analysis.Asa Kasher - 2005 - Ethical Perspectives 12 (1):67-97.
    The purpose of this article is to outline a systematic answer to the question of collective autonomy, its conceptual nature and lmimits, and apply it by way of example to the case of the engineering profession.In the first section, it is argued that a professional activity involves systematic knowledge and proficiency, a form of continuous improvement of the related bodies of knowledge and proficiency, as well as two levels of understanding: a local one, which is the ability to justify (...)
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  34.  7
    Normative Practices as an Intermediate Between Theoretical Ethics and Morality.Henk Jochemsen - 2006 - Philosophia Reformata 71 (1):96-112.
    One of the career options Ede Christian University for higher professional education offers is nursing. As a Christian professional school, the ECU provides learning environments for nursing students to become professionals who are to exhibit a Christian life style, values and professional ethics. Nursing graduates of our school in general may have a Christian disposition regarding major issues in health care like displaying respect for patients, having a correct attitude, practising informed consent, displaying confidentiality, and avoiding euthanasia (...)
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  35.  29
    Are Business Managers “Professionals”?Thomas Donaldson - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):83-94.
    This paper examines two issues about professionalism and business that appear at first blush to be entirely separate. The first is the question of who counts as a “professional,” and whether, in particular, business people are “professionals.” The second issue is howacknowledged professionals that regularly interact with business, such as accountants, lawyers, and physicians, can find the moral free space necessary to maintain professional integrity in the face of financial pressures. Conflicts of interest for professionals working incorporations recur (...)
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  36. What Is Professional Integrity?Andreas Eriksen - 2015 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 9 (2):3-17.
    What is professional integrity and what makes it so important? Policies are designed to promote it and decisions are justified in its name. This paper identifies two competing conceptions of professional integrity and argues that, on their own, both are deficient. In response, this paper develops a third, interpretive view, in which professional integrity is conceived as the virtue of being good on the word of the practice. Professions ask for the public’s trust and in doing so, (...)
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  37.  7
    Still a Moral Dilemma: How Ethiopian Professionals Providing Abortion Come to Terms with Conflicting Norms and Demands.Morten Magelssen, Jan Helge Solbakk, Viva Combs Thorsen & Demelash Bezabih Ewnetu - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundThe Ethiopian law on abortion was liberalized in 2005. However, as a strongly religious country, the new law has remained controversial from the outset. Many abortion providers have religious allegiances, which begs the question how to negotiate the conflicting demands of their jobs and their commitment to their patients on the one hand, and their religious convictions and moral values on the other.MethodA qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with 30 healthcare professionals involved in abortion services in either private/non-governmental clinics (...)
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  38.  1
    Connectivity is Not Enough. Socially Networked Professional Environments and Epistemic Norms.Frederik Truyen & Filip Buekens - unknown
    With the help of key normative concepts borrowed from social epistemology and work on epistemic duties and norms of justification we want to clarify what is at the core of learning mediated through testimony. In socially networked professional contexts, assessment of the epistemic reliability of networked information is important: justification of knowledge acquired via the word of others has an intrinsic social and normative dimension. Whereas the former has been largely taken into account in today’s learning theories based (...)
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  39.  11
    Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters.Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):40-50.
    Most work addressing clinical workers' professional responsibilities concerns the norms of conduct within established professional–patient relationships, but such responsibilities may extend beyond the clinical context. We explore health workers' professional responsibilities in such “informal” encounters through the example of a doctor witnessing the misdiagnosis and mistreatment of a serious long-term condition in a television documentary, arguing that neither internalist approaches to professional responsibility nor externalist ones provide sufficiently clear guidance in such situations. We propose that (...)
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  40.  19
    Investigating Socialization, Work-Related Norms, and the Ethical Perceptions of Marketing Practitioners.Nicholas McClaren, Stewart Adam & Andrea Vocino - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):95 - 115.
    This study examines the influence of socialization on work-related norms (WORKNORM).We tested the hypothesis that organizational (ORGSOC) and professional socialization (PROFSOC) are antecedent influences on WORKNORM, employing a sample of 339 marketing practitioners. The results of covariance structural analysis indicate that ORGSOC and PROFSOC and WORKNORM are discriminant constructs within the tested model. The study also reveals that the influence of ORGSOC on WORKNORM is stronger than the influence of PROFSOC on these same norms.Because this social learning (...)
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  41.  26
    Dealing with the Normative Dimension in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Stella Reiter-Theil - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):347.
    Clinical ethics consultation not only interprets moral issues at the bedside and is not restricted to giving support for the “technical” handling of these moral issues, but it has to substantively address moral values, norms, and conflicts in the process of discussing cases and problems. We call this the normative dimension and use normative in the sense of embracing moral values and convictions of persons and groups, norms, and relevant professional and ethical guidelines as well as legal (...)
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  42.  37
    Standards for Academic and Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational Studies, and Educational Policy Studies Third Edition, 2012, Draft Presented to the Educational Community by the American Educational Studies Association's Committee on Academic Standards and Accreditation.Committee on Academic Standards and Accreditation: Sandra Winn Tutwiler, Kathleen deMarrais, David Gabbard, Andrea Hyde, Pamela Konkol, Huey-li Li, Yolanda Medina, Joseph Rayle & Amy Swain - 2013 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 49 (2):107-118.
    (2013). Standards for Academic and Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational Studies, and Educational Policy Studies Third Edition, 2012, Draft Presented to the Educational Community by the American Educational Studies Association's Committee on Academic Standards and Accreditation. Educational Studies: Vol. 49, Critical, Interpretive, and Normative Perspectives of Educational Foundations: Contributions for the 21st Century, pp. 107-118.
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  43.  18
    General Complexity, Ethical Complexity and Normative Professionalization.Harry Kunneman - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (2):449-453.
    This article addresses the critical comments that focus on what is perceived as lack of clarity with regard to different uses of the system concept: on the one hand, in the usual general sense, on the other, in a specific ‘Habermassian’ sense. This final reply tries to remedy this in critical discussion with Morin, arguing that Morin’s paradigm of generalized complexity addresses the question of what subjects are, but remains silent with regard to the question of who they are. Answering (...)
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  44. Facts, Values, and Norms: Essays Toward a Morality of Consequence.Peter Railton - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    In our everyday lives we struggle with the notions of why we do what we do and the need to assign values to our actions. Somehow, it seems possible through experience and life to gain knowledge and understanding of such matters. Yet once we start delving deeper into the concepts that underwrite these domains of thought and actions, we face a philosophical disappointment. In contrast to the world of facts, values and morality seem insecure, uncomfortably situated, easily influenced by illusion (...)
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  45.  21
    Missing the Target: Normative Stakeholder Theory and the Corporate Governance Debate.John Hendry - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (1):159-176.
    After a decade of intensive debate, stakeholder ideas have come to exert a significant influence on academic managementthinking, but normative stakeholder theory itself appears to be in considerable disarray. This paper attempts to untangle the confusionand to prepare the ground for a more productive approach to the normative stakeholder problem. The paper identifies three distinctkinds of normative stakeholder theory and three different levels of claim that can be made by such theories, and uses this classificationto argue that stakeholder theorists have (...)
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  46.  33
    Organizational Change, Normative Control Deinstitutionalization, and Corruption.Kelly D. Martin, Jean L. Johnson & John B. Cullen - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):105-130.
    Despite widespread attention to corruption and organizational change in the literature, to our knowledge, no research has attempted to understand the linkages between these two powerful organizational phenomena. Accordingly, we draw on major theories in ethics, sociology, and management to develop a theoretical framework for understanding how organizational change can sometimes generate corruption. We extend anomie theory and ethical climate theory to articulate the deinstitutionalization of the normative control system and argue that, through this deinstitutionalization, organizations have the potential to (...)
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  47.  13
    Mature Care in Professional Relationships and Health Care Prioritizations.Marita Nordhaug & Per Nortvedt - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (2):209-216.
    This article addresses some ambiguities and normative problems with the concept of mature care in professional relationships and in health care priorities. Mature care has recently been introduced in the literature on care ethics as an alternative to prevailing altruistic conceptions of care. The essence of mature care is an emphasis on reciprocity, where the mature agent has the ability to balance the concerns of self with those of others and act from a principle of not causing harm. Our (...)
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  48.  64
    A Framework for Discussing Normative Theories of Business Ethics.Bishop John Douglas - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):563-591.
    This paper carries forward the conceptual clarification of normative theories of business ethics ably begun by Hasnas in the January 1998 issue of BEQ. This paper proposes a normatively neutral framework for discussing and assessing such normative theories. Every normative theory needs to address these seven issues: it needs to specify a moral principle that identifies (1) recommended values and (2) the grounds for accepting those values. It also must specify (3) a decision principle that business people who accept the (...)
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  49.  33
    Is Compliance a Professional Virtue of Researchers? Reflections on Promoting the Responsible Conduct of Research.James M. DuBois - 2004 - Ethics and Behavior 14 (4):383 – 395.
    Evidence exists that behavioral and social science researchers have been frustrated with regulations and institutional review boards (IRBs) from the 1970s through today. Making matters worse, many human participants protection instruction programs - now mandated by IRBs - offer inadequate reasons why researchers should comply with regulations and IRBs. Promoting compliance either for its own sake or to avoid penalties is contrary to the developmental aims of moral education and may be ineffective in fostering the responsible conduct of research. This (...)
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  50.  36
    ‘Teacher as Professional’ as Metaphor: What It Highlights and What It Hides.Bruce Maxwell - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):86-106.
    This article is concerned with the downsides of using the language of professionalism in educational discourse. It suggests that the language of professionalization can be a powerful rhetorical device for promoting welcome and necessary changes in the field of teaching but that, in doing so, it can unintentionally misrepresent the work that teachers do. Taking as a theoretical framework Lakoff and Johnson's metaphor theory, the article argues that ‘teacher as professional’ should be seen as a metaphor of teaching on (...)
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