Results for 'Psycho-social effects of'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  14
    The Long-Term Psycho-Social Effects of Abortion on Women.Philippa Taylor - 2012 - The New Bioethics 18 (2):89-100.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  36
    Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW]Karen E. Tatum - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Brand Performance: The Mediating Effect of Industrial Brand Equity and Corporate Reputation. [REVIEW]Chi-Shiun Lai, Chih-Jen Chiu, Chin-Fang Yang & Da-Chang Pai - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):457 - 469.
    In this article, the researchers explore the following question. Can corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the corporate reputation of a firm lead to its brand equity in business-to-business (B2B) markets? This study discusses CSR from customers' viewpoints by taking the sample of industrial purchasers from Taiwan small-medium enterprises. The aims of this study are to investigate: first, the effects of CSR and corporate reputation on industrial brand equity; second, the effects of CSR, corporate reputation, and brand equity on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  4.  32
    Understanding Purchase Intention During Product-Harm Crises: Moderating Effects of Perceived Corporate Ability and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu-Chuan Chen, Chou-Kang Chiu & Wan-Yu Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):455-471.
    A company’s product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e.g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study’s proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative publicity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  5.  26
    The Catch-22 of Responsible Luxury: Effects of Luxury Product Characteristics on Consumers' Perception of Fit with Corporate Social Responsibility.Catherine Janssen, Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen & Cécile Lefebvre - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):45-57.
    The notion of “responsible luxury” may appear as a contradiction in terms. This article investigates the influence of two defining characteristics of luxury products—scarcity and ephemerality—on consumers’ perception of the fit between luxury and corporate social responsibility (CSR), as well as how this perceived fit affects consumers’ attitudes toward luxury products. A field experiment reveals that ephemerality moderates the positive impact of scarcity on consumers’ perception of fit between luxury and CSR. When luxury products are enduring (e.g., jewelry), a scarce (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  6.  28
    Is It What You Do, or When You Do It? The Roles of Contingency and Similarity in Pro‐Social Effects of Imitation.Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (8):1541-1552.
    Being imitated has a wide range of pro-social effects, but it is not clear how these effects are mediated. Naturalistic studies of the effects of being imitated have not established whether pro-social outcomes are due to the similarity and/or the contingency between the movements performed by the actor and those of the imitator. Similarity is often assumed to be the active ingredient, but we hypothesized that contingency might also be important, as it produces positive affect in infants (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7.  41
    Consumer Evaluations of Social Alliances: The Effects of Perceived Fit Between Companies and Non-Profit Organizations. [REVIEW]Namin Kim, Youri Sung & Moonkyu Lee - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):163-174.
    Company–cause fit has been one of the major issues in the domain of corporate social responsibility. This study tries to expand the perspective from company–cause to company–non-profit organization (NPO) fit, and it gives implications to firms looking for long-term collaboration with an NPO. Specifically, it suggests three types of fit, i.e., familiarity, business, and activity fit and investigates the potential effects of these fits in social alliances between companies and the partnering NPOs on consumer attributions of the firms’ motives (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8.  65
    Social Structure and the Effects of Conformity.Kevin Zollman - 2010 - Synthese 172 (3):317-340.
    Conformity is an often criticized feature of human belief formation. Although generally regarded as a negative influence on reliability, it has not been widely studied. This paper attempts to determine the epistemic effects of conformity by analyzing a mathematical model of this behavior. In addition to investigating the effect of conformity on the reliability of individuals and groups, this paper attempts to determine the optimal structure for conformity. That is, supposing that conformity is inevitable, what is the best way (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  9.  22
    The Effects of Women on Corporate Boards on Firm Value, Financial Performance, and Ethical and Social Compliance.Helena Isidro & Márcia Sobral - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):1-19.
    The European Commission has recently proposed the introduction of legally binding quotas for women on corporate boards of European companies. This proposal has put the spotlight on the question of whether increasing female representation on the board brings economic benefits to the firm. In order to shed light on the issue, this study investigates the direct and indirect effects of women on the board on firm value. We use a simultaneous equation model to estimate the effects of women (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  48
    Unplanned Effects of Intelligent Agents on Internet Use: A Social Informatics Approach. [REVIEW]Alexander Serenko, Umar Ruhi & Mihail Cocosila - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):141-166.
    This paper instigates a discourse on the unplanned effects of intelligent agents in the context of their use on the Internet. By utilizing a social informatics framework as a lens of analysis, the study identifies several unanticipated consequences of using intelligent agents for information- and commerce-based tasks on the Internet. The effects include those that transpire over time at the organizational level, such as e-commerce transformation, operational encumbrance and security overload, as well as those that emerge on a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  24
    Two Acts of Social Intelligence: The Effects of Mimicry and Social Praise on the Evaluation of an Artificial Agent. [REVIEW]Maurits Kaptein, Panos Markopoulos, Boris Ruyter & Emile Aarts - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):261-273.
    This paper describes a study of the effects of two acts of social intelligence, namely mimicry and social praise, when used by an artificial social agent. An experiment ( N = 50) is described which shows that social praise—positive feedback about the ongoing conversation—increases the perceived friendliness of a chat-robot. Mimicry—displaying matching behavior—enhances the perceived intelligence of the robot. We advice designers to incorporate both mimicry and social praise when their system needs to function as a social actor. Different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  7
    Does Ownership Structure Matter? The Effects of Insider and Institutional Ownership on Corporate Social Responsibility.Won-Yong Oh, Jongseok Cha & Young Kyun Chang - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):111-124.
    The extant literature has examined the effects of ownership structures on corporate social responsibility, yet it has overlooked the non-linear and interactive effects among major shareholder groups. In this study, we examine the non-linear effects of insider and institutional ownerships on CSR. We also examine whether it is necessary to have both incentive alignment and monitoring mechanisms or it is sufficient to have either mechanism to promote CSR. Using a sample of the U.S. Fortune 1000 firms, our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  7
    Crossover Effects of Servant Leadership and Job Social Support on Employee Spouses: The Mediating Role of Employee Organization-Based Self-Esteem.Ziwei Yang, Haina Zhang, Ho Kwong Kwan & Shouming Chen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (3):595-604.
    The present study investigated the crossover effects of employee perceptions of servant leadership and job social support on the family satisfaction and quality of family life experienced by the employees’ spouses. These effects were explored through a focus on the mediating role of employee organization-based self-esteem. Results from a three-wave field survey of 199 employee–spouse dyads in the People’s Republic of China support our hypotheses, indicating that OBSE fully mediates the positive effects of servant leadership and job (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  86
    The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior.Longinos Marin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65-78.
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity salience is shown (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  15.  12
    Social Security Survivors Benefits: The Effects of Reproductive Pathways and Intestacy Law on Attitudes.Jason D. Hans & Martie Gillen - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):514-524.
    Most minor children are eligible for Social Security survivors benefits if a wage-earning parent dies, but eligibility of children not in utero at the time of death is more nuanced. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes concerning access to Social Security survivors benefits in the context of posthumous reproduction. A probability sample of 540 Florida households responded to a multiple-segment factorial vignette designed to examine the effects of state intestacy laws and five reproductive pathways – normative, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    Aids And The Psycho-Social Diciplines: The Social Control of "Dangerous" Behavior.Mark Kaplan - 1990 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3-4):337-352.
    AIDS provides society an opportunity to expand and rationliza control over a broad range of psychological phenomena. Social control today is panoptical, involving dispersed centers and agents of surveillance and discipline throughout the whole community . The control of persons perceived as "dangerous" is effected partly through public psycho-social discourse on AIDS. This reproduces earlier encounters with frightening diseases, most notably the nineteenth-century cholera epidemic, and reveals a morally-laden ideology behind modern efforts at public hygiene.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Effects of a Business Ethics Elective on Hong Kong Undergraduates’ Attitudes Toward Corporate Ethics and Social Responsibility.Richard Simmons, William Shafer & Robin Snell - 2013 - Business and Society 52 (4):558-591.
    This study examines the effect of a business ethics course on undergraduates’ attitudes toward the importance of corporate ethics and social responsibility, as measured by the PRESOR scale. It employs a survey approach, adopting a pretest/posttest methodology in the data collection. A total of 132 undergraduate students were surveyed over a period of four semesters during 2006 and 2007. To test the effects of individual personality characteristics and examine their potential interaction with ethical education, participants’ personal values and degree (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18.  1
    Changing Patterns of Social Variation in Stature in Poland: Effects of Transition From a Command Economy to the Free-Market System?T. Bielicki, A. Szklarska, S. Koziel & S. J. Ulijaszek - 2005 - Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (4):427-434.
    The aim of this analysis was to examine the effects on stature in two nationally representative samples of Polish 19-year-old conscripts of maternal and paternal education level, and of degree of urbanization, before and after the economic transition of 1990. Data were from two national surveys of 19-year-old Polish conscripts: 27,236 in 1986 and 28,151 in 2001. In addition to taking height measurements, each subject was asked about the socioeconomic background of their families, including paternal and maternal education, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  33
    The Community Effects of Industrialized Farming: Social Science Research and Challenges to Corporate Farming Laws. [REVIEW]Linda Lobao & Curtis W. Stofferahn - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):219-240.
    Social scientists have a long history of concern with the effects of industrialized farming on communities. Recently, the topic has taken on new importance as corporate farming laws in a number of states are challenged by agribusiness interests. Defense of these laws often requires evidence from social science research that industrialized farming poses risks to communities. A problem is that no recent journal articles or books systematically assess the extent to which research to date provides evidence of these risks. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  20.  23
    Suffering From Social Inequality: Normative Implications of Empirical Research on the Effects of Inequality.Fabian Schuppert - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (1):97-115.
    Empirical research shows the significant negative effects inequality has on aspects such as public health, vulnerability to violence, and social trust. While the majority of researchers agree that there exist specific social determinants of health as well as a distinct social gradient in health , there is wide disagreement both over what the exact causal relationship between social inequalities and health is, and what the adequate policy responses especially to the SGH are. For policy-oriented theorists, the question arises which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  11
    The Effects of a Social Studies Course on the Philosophic Orientations of History and Geography Graduate Students in Botswana.Michael Bamidele Adeyemi[1] - 1992 - Educational Studies 18 (2):235-243.
    (1992). The Effects of a Social Studies Course on the Philosophic Orientations of History and Geography Graduate Students in Botswana. Educational Studies: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 235-243.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Determinants and Performance Effects of Social Performance Measurement Systems.Irene Eleonora Lisi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):225-251.
    This study investigates the performance measurement systems adopted by companies to manage their social responsibility activities, a theme that remains under-researched despite the important role that these mechanisms may play in helping firms control and improve their social performance. An integrative model is developed to examine how the three fundamental drivers of corporate social strategies, i.e., business motivations, perceived stakeholder pressures, and top management’s social commitment, influence the use of social performance indicators for internal decision-making and control and how such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  9
    Justifying Educational Acquaintance with the Moral Horrors of History on Psycho-Social Grounds: 'Facing History and Ourselves' in Critical Perspective.Bruce Maxwell - 2008 - Ethics and Education 3 (1):75-85.
    This paper challenges a pervasive curricular justification for educationally acquainting young people with stories of genocide and other moral horrors from history. According to this justification, doing so favours the development of psycho-social soft skills connected with interpersonal awareness and the establishment and maintenance of positive relationships. It is argued that this justification not only renders the specific historical content incidental to the development of these skills. The educational intention of promoting such psycho-social soft skills by way of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    The Effects of a Social Studies Course on the Philosophic Orientations of History and Geography Graduate Students in Botswana.Michael Bamidele Adeyemi - 1992 - Educational Studies 18 (2):235-243.
    This investigation was concerned with the effects of a social studies course on the philosophic orientations of history and geography students undergoing a programme in Postgraduate Diploma in Education at the University of Botswana. Forty‐eight of them were taught a social studies course to determine whether their social studies orientations would change at the end of the course with the use of the Barth/Shermis Social Studies Preference Scale. It was found that a large number of the students tended to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  2
    The Effects of Institutional Corporate Social Responsibility on Bank Loans.Shyam Kumar, Pamela Harper & Bill Francis - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (7):1407-1439.
    The authors study the impact of institutional corporate social responsibility —defined as CSR targeted at a borrowing firm’s secondary stakeholders—on bank loans. Findings suggest that higher levels of institutional CSR are associated with lower levels of interest rates and loan spreads. In addition, institutional CSR also tempers the positive impact of loan maturity and firm leverage on interest rates and loan spread. These effects were strongest among firms that demonstrated sustained performance, rather than among firms that showed mixed performance (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  88
    The Advertising Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Reputation and Brand Equity: Evidence From the Life Insurance Industry in Taiwan. [REVIEW]Ker-Tah Hsu - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):189-201.
    This study investigates the persuasive advertising and informative advertising effects of CSR initiatives on corporate reputation and brand equity based on the evidence from the life insurance industry in Taiwan. The study finds, first, policyholders’ perceptions concerning the CSR initiatives of life insurance companies have positive effects on customer satisfaction, corporate reputation, and brand equity. Second, the advertising effects of the CSR initiatives on corporate reputation are only informative. Third, the impacts of CSR initiatives on brand equity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  27.  39
    Configuration of External Influences: The Combined Effects of Institutions and Stakeholders on Corporate Social Responsibility Strategies. [REVIEW]Min-Dong Paul Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):281-298.
    This article introduces a theoretical framework that combines institutional and stakeholder theories to explain how firms choose their corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy. Organizational researchers have identified several distinct CSR strategies (e.g., obstructionist, defensive, accommodative, and proactive), but did not explain the sources of divergence. This article argues that the divergence comes from the variability in the configuration of external influences that consists of institutional and stakeholder pressures. While institutions affect firms’ social behavior by shaping the macro-level incentive structure and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  28.  8
    Trickle Effects of Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Kolk Ans, Dolen Willemijn van & Vock Marlene - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):123 - 137.
    Cross-sector social partnerships are often studied from a macro and meso perspective, also in an attempt to assess effectiveness and societal impact. This article pays specific attention to the micro perspective, i.e. individual interactions between and within organizations related to partnerships that address the 'social good'. By focusing on the potential effects and mechanisms at the level of individuals and the organization(s) with which they interact, it aims to help fill a gap in research on partnerships, including more insight (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  29.  49
    A Global Analysis of Corporate Social Performance: The Effects of Cultural and Geographic Environments. [REVIEW]Foo Nin Ho, Hui-Ming Deanna Wang & Scott J. Vitell - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):423-433.
    As more and more multi-national companies expand their operations globally, their responsibilities extend beyond not only the economic motive of profitability but also other social and environmental factors. The objective of this article is to examine the impact of national culture and geographic environment on firms’ corporate social performance (CSP). Empirical tests are based on a global CSP database of companies from 49 countries. Results show that the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are significantly associated with CSP. In addition, European companies are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  30.  4
    An Empirical Examination of Firm, Industry, and Temporal Effects on Corporate Social Performance.G. Tomas M. Hult, Charles C. Snow, David J. Ketchen, Aaron F. McKenny & Jeremy C. Short - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (8):1122-1156.
    Research examining firm and industry effects on performance has primarily focused on the financial aspects of firm performance. Corporate social performance is a major aspect of firm performance that has been under-examined empirically in the literature to date. Adding to the fundamental debate regarding firm versus industry effects on performance, this study uses data drawn from the Kinder, Lydenberg and Domini Co. database to examine the degree to which CSP is related to firm, industry, and temporal factors. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  31
    Longitudinal Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Customer Relationships.Russell Lacey & Pamela A. Kennett-Hensel - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):581 - 597.
    Despite the emergence of corporate social responsibility, the impact of CSR efforts on customer relationships remains decidedly unclear. Moreover, previous studies have examined CSR in cross-sectional, experimental, and/or artificial settings. Through field survey data collected at both the beginning (n = 750) and conclusion (n = 469) of the 2007-2008 NBA season, the authors investigate linkages between customers' perceptions of the CSR performance of an NBA team and the strength of their relationship with this same organization. With all respondents of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  32.  13
    Leadership Centrality and Corporate Social Ir-Responsibility (CSIR): The Potential Ameliorating Effects of Self and Shared Leadership on CSIR.Craig L. Pearce & Charles C. Manz - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):563-579.
    Recent scandals involving executive leadership have significantly contributed to the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR) becoming one of the most important concerns of the management literature in the twenty-first century. The antithesis of CSR is embodied in executive corruption and malfeasance. Unfortunately such things are all too frequent. We view the degree of centrality of leadership, and the primary power motivation of leaders, as key factors that influence the engagement in corruptive leader behavior and consequent corporate social ir-responsibility (CSIR) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  18
    Agent Tracking: A Psycho-Historical Theory of the Identification of Living and Social Agents.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):359-382.
    To explain agent-identification behaviours, universalist theories in the biological and cognitive sciences have posited mental mechanisms thought to be universal to all humans, such as agent detection and face recognition mechanisms. These universalist theories have paid little attention to how particular sociocultural or historical contexts interact with the psychobiological processes of agent-identification. In contrast to universalist theories, contextualist theories appeal to particular historical and sociocultural contexts for explaining agent-identification. Contextualist theories tend to adopt idiographic methods aimed at recording the heterogeneity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  9
    The Effects of Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility on Employee Attitudes.Ante Glavas & Ken Kelley - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2):165-202.
    We explore the impact on employee attitudes of their perceptions of how others outside the organization are treated above and beyond the impact of how employees are directly treated by the organization. Results of a study of 827 employees in eighteen organizations show that employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility are positively related to organizational commitment with the relationship being partially mediated by work meaningfulness and perceived organizational support and job satisfaction with work meaningfulness partially mediating the relationship but not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  35.  6
    The Effects of a Social Context on Reputational Judgments of Corporate Social Responsibility.Holly Fairbaim, Stephen Pavelin & Haiming Hang - 2015 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 26:167-178.
    In this article we aim to build on an emergent literature that recognizes a corporate reputation as an aggregation of individual reputational judgments. We apply insights from social influence theory in order to develop a set of testable propositions to explain how various aspects of a social context – the visibility of judgments and the anticipation of discussion – affects individuals’ reputational judgments of CSR.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  10
    The Effects of “Going Private” on Corporate Financial and Corporate Social Performance.Marguerite Schneider & Alix Valenti - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:236-245.
    The newly private corporation challenges scholars to re-examine corporate social responsibility under a markedly different governance system. We theorize regarding the implications of public corporations going private through use of private equity. The new governance system includes few owners and an expert, involved board of directors; combined with a greatly reduced public presence, public-to-private firms are proposed to place greater emphasis on financial performance and lesser emphasis on social performance. Several variables are proposed to moderate the lesser emphasis on social (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  37
    The Dynamics of Culture, Innovation and Organisational Change: A Nano-Psychology Future Perspective of the Psycho-Social and Cultural Underpinnings of Innovation and Technology.Eunice McCarthy - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (4):471-482.
    This article addresses salient conceptual issues in social organisational psychology in probing change in organisational systems, e.g., culture, innovation and implementation, reflective practice and change models. Insights from chaos–complexity research in the natural sciences which underpin the dynamics of flux and change to unravel the hidden, the unexplained, the disordered will be built on to explore the phenomena of change from a social psychological perspective. The concept of nano-psychology is introduced to open up a creative debate in the social psychological (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  21
    The Effects of Social Ties on Coordination: Conceptual Foundations for an Empirical Analysis. [REVIEW]Giuseppe Attanasi, Astrid Hopfensitz, Emiliano Lorini & Frédéric Moisan - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):47-73.
    This paper investigates the influence that social ties can have on behavior. After defining the concept of social ties that we consider, we introduce an original model of social ties. The impact of such ties on social preferences is studied in a coordination game with outside option. We provide a detailed game theoretical analysis of this game while considering various types of players, i.e., self-interest maximizing, inequity averse, and fair agents. In addition to these approaches that require strategic reasoning in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  13
    Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin American Communities.Roberto Gutiérrez & Audra Jones - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:303-328.
    Five different Latin American experiences help us to understand the impacts of corporate social responsibility on communities. We focus on communities composed of low-income populations to compare types of interventions, their main characteristics, spaces for community participation, and some results and impacts. Some of the findings indicate that (a) a company’s enlightened self-interest in its CSR program ensures its commitment to the program and the program’s sustainability; (b) community involvement from the outset in defining a project increases the probability of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  24
    The Effects of Social and Moral Integration on Ethical Standards: A Comparison of American and Ukrainian Business Students. [REVIEW]Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):901 - 911.
    This paper examines levels of similarity in ethical outlooks in countries where economic and sociocultural values may differ markedly. We compared students from a capitalist country, the United States, with students from Ukraine, a country experiencing dramatic ideological confusion and economic change. We tested the hypothesis that greater social and moral integration, as operationalized by a lack of alienation and by religiousness, will directly affect one's willingness to engage in unethical business practices.The sample was composed of business students in both (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  41.  13
    Organizational Attention to Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Social Performance: The Moderating Effects of Corporate Governance.Xiaoping Zhao, Shouming Chen & Chan Xiong - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):386-399.
    Many studies have explored the antecedents of corporate social performance, such as institutional forces and stakeholder pressures. However, few studies examine CSP from a socio-cognitive perspective. To address this research void, this study adopts an attention-based approach to examine the relationship between managers' attention to social issues and CSP. More important, this study reports that this relationship will be moderated by governance mechanisms that constrain managerial discretion. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms, this study provides empirical support for these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  42.  8
    Social Cognitive Theory: The Antecedents and Effects of Ethical Climate Fit on Organizational Attitudes of Corporate Accounting Professionals—A Reflection of Client Narcissism and Fraud Attitude Risk.Madeline Ann Domino, Stephen C. Wingreen & James E. Blanton - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):453-467.
    The rash of high-profile accounting frauds involving internal corporate accountants calls into question the individual accountant’s perceptions of the ethical climate within their organization and the limits to which these professionals will tolerate unethical behavior and/or accept it as the norm. This study uses social cognitive theory to examine the antecedents of individual corporate accountant’s perceived personal fit with their organization’s ethical climate and empirically tests how these factors impact organizational attitudes. A survey was completed by 203 corporate accountants to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  76
    CEO Leadership Styles and the Implementation of Organizational Diversity Practices: Moderating Effects of Social Values and Age. [REVIEW]Eddy S. Ng & Greg J. Sears - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):41-52.
    Drawing on strategic choice theory, we investigate the influence of CEO leadership styles and personal attributes on the implementation of organizational diversity management practices. Specifically, we examined CEO transformational and transactional leadership in relation to organizational diversity practices and whether CEO social values and age may moderate these relationships. Our results suggest that transformational leadership is most strongly associated with the implementation of diversity practices. Transactional leadership is also related to the implementation of diversity management practices when either CEO social (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  26
    To Blow or Not to Blow the Whistle: The Effects of Potential Harm, Social Pressure and Organisational Commitment on Whistleblowing Intention and Behaviour.Ching‐Pu Chen & Chih‐Tsung Lai - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3):327-342.
    This study uses a rational ethical decision-making framework to examine the influence of moral intensity (potential harm and social pressure) on whistleblowing intention and behaviour using organisational commitment as a moderator. A scenario was developed, and an online questionnaire was used to conduct an empirical analysis on the responses of 533 participants. The mean age and years of work experience of the respondents were 31 and 8.2 years, respectively. The results show, first, that while moral intensity is correlated with whistleblowing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  5
    Comparison of Sporting Values in Europe: Effects of Social Institutionalization in Three European Territories.Bernard Massiera, Ben Mahmoud Imed & Long Thierry - 2018 - Journal of Human Values 24 (3):208-222.
    This study examines the representations conveyed by sports practitioners and the ideologies that govern sports institutions in three European countries. Sports organizations seem to construct identitary references for practitioners through the values they convey and the forms of sociability that they develop. This international study compares the practices and representations of sport based on a questionnaire sent to a sample of practitioners in Cardiff, Great Britain; Nice, France; and Pitesti, Romania. The findings indicate some differences. In Great Britain, sports practices (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  67
    Social Effects of Oxytocin in Humans: Context and Person Matter.Jennifer A. Bartz, Jamil Zaki, Niall Bolger & Kevin N. Ochsner - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):301-309.
  47.  36
    Expectations and Social Decision-Making: Biasing Effects of Prior Knowledge on Ultimatum Responses. [REVIEW]Alan G. Sanfey - 2009 - Mind and Society 8 (1):93-107.
    Psychological studies have long demonstrated effects of expectations on judgment, whereby the provision of information, either implicitly or explicitly, prior to an experience or decision can exert a substantial influence on the observed behavior. This study extended these expectation effects to the domain of interactive economic decision-making. Prior to playing a commonly-used bargaining task, the Ultimatum Game, participants were primed to expect offers that would be either relatively fair or unfair. A third group played the Game without receiving (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  48.  1
    Effects of Social and Affective Content on Exogenous Attention as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials.Vladimir Kosonogov, Jose M. Martinez-Selva, Eduvigis Carrillo-Verdejo, Ginesa Torrente, Luis Carretié & Juan P. Sanchez-Navarro - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-13.
    ABSTRACTThe social content of affective stimuli has been proposed as having an influence on cognitive processing and behaviour. This research was aimed, therefore, at studying whether automatic exogenous attention demanded by affective pictures was related to their social value. We hypothesised that affective social pictures would capture attention to a greater extent than non-social affective stimuli. For this purpose, we recorded event-related potentials in a sample of 24 participants engaged in a digit categorisation task. Distracters were affective pictures varying in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  4
    Constructing a Web Effects of Power and Social Responsiveness on Firm-Stakeholder Relationships.Stephanie A. Welcomer, Philip L. Cochran, Gordon Rands & Mark Haggerty - 2003 - Business and Society 42 (1):43-82.
    In this single industry study, the authors examine relationships between forest products companies in Maine and their stakeholders. The research question, why do firms work with stakeholders, is examined from both instrumental and normative perspectives. Specifically, it is hypothesized that stakeholder power and corporate social responsiveness affect the degree to which firms have working relationships with stakeholders. The study found support for the impact of the firm’s perception of stakeholder power on the strength of its relationships with stakeholders. Most notably, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  50.  3
    The Effects of Social Anxiety on Emotional Face Discrimination and its Modulation by Mouth Salience.Andrew R. du Rocher & Alan D. Pickering - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-8.
    ABSTRACTPeople high in social anxiety experience fear of social situations due to the likelihood of social evaluation. Whereas happy faces are generally processed very quickly, this effect is impaired by high social anxiety. Mouth regions are implicated during emotional face processing, therefore differences in mouth salience might affect how social anxiety relates to emotional face discrimination. We designed an emotional facial expression recognition task to reveal how varying levels of sub-clinical social anxiety related to the discrimination of happy and fearful (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000