14 found
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  1. Filiality Versus Sociality and Individuality: On Confucianism as "Consanguinitism".Qingping Liu - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (2):234-250.
    : Confucianism is often valued as a doctrine that highlights both the individual and social dimensions of the ideal person, for it indeed puts special emphasis on such lofty goals as loving all humanity and cultivating the self. Through a close and critical analysis of the texts of the Analects and the Mencius, however, it is attempted to demonstrate that because Confucius and Mencius always take filial piety, or, more generally, consanguineous affection, as not only the foundation but also the (...)
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  2.  23
    On Confucius' Principle of Consanguineous Affection: A Reading of the Dialogue About the Three-Year Mourning in the Lunyu.Qingping Liu - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (3):173 – 188.
    In his dialogue with Zai Wo about the three-year mourning, Confucius establishes a principle of 'justification by feeling at ease,' and insists that one should transcend natural desires by moral emotions. More significantly, he further regards kinship love as the ultimate root and supreme principle of human life. Thus, this dialogue contains almost all the basic elements of the Confucian spirit of consanguineous affection.
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  3.  63
    To become a filial son, a loyal subject, or a humane person?—On the confucian ideas about humanity.Qingping Liu - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (2):173 – 188.
    Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi regard the human as an emotional being and especially consider such moral feelings as humane love, filial piety and devoted loyalty to be the constituent elements of humanity. On the one hand, they try to integrate the corresponding multiple roles of the humane person, filial son and loyal subject in harmony in order to make one become a true human in the ethical sense; on the other hand, they assign a supreme position merely to filial piety (...)
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  4.  27
    Is Mencius' Doctrine of 'Commiseration' Tenable?Qingping Liu - 2001 - Asian Philosophy 11 (2):73 – 84.
    Mencius regards the 'heart of commiseration' as the 'beginning of humaneness', so as to set up a universal and sufficient foundation for the Confucian ideal of humane love in the human 'heart-nature'. Through a close and critical analysis of the very text of the Mencius, however, this essay tries to show that if in the light of the fundamental spirit of Confucianism, especially in the light of the principles of 'one root' and 'love with distinctions' advocated by Mencius himself in (...)
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  5.  22
    Is Mencius' Doctrine of 'Extending Affection' Tenable?Qingping Liu - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (1):79 – 90.
    In his doctrine of 'extending affection' (tui en), Mencius holds that one can transform particular consanguineous affection into universal humane love by the way of 'taking this heart here and applying it to what is over there'. Through a critical analysis of the text of the Mencius, it is attempted to argue that although this doctrine can combine the two mainstays of Confucian thought, i.e., filiality and humaneness, into an integrated unity, it is not tenable within the Confucian framework in (...)
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  6.  42
    On the Possibility of Universal Love for All Humans: A Comparative Study of Confucian and Christian Ethics.Qingping Liu - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):225-237.
    On the one hand, Confucianism and Christianity advocate universal love for all humans on the ultimate basis of particular love for parents or for God respectively. On the other hand, they have to sacrifice the former for the latter in cases of conflict since they give top priority merely to the latter. In order to overcome this paradox in theory and realize the ideal of universal love in practice, they should transform their particularistic frameworks into universalistic ones and assign a (...)
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  7.  23
    On a Paradox of Christian Love.Qingping Liu - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):681-694.
    The two love commands attributed to Jesus clearly show the basic feature of Christianity as a "religion of love." However, it may be argued that there is conflict between these commands, so that the Christian idea of love confronts a deep paradox: on the one hand, it takes loving God as the ultimate foundation of loving one's neighbor and loving one's neighbor as the perfect manifestation of loving God. On the other hand, it gives supremacy to loving God over loving (...)
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  8.  7
    Emotionales in Confucianism and Daoism: A New Interpretation.Qingping Liu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):118-133.
  9.  36
    May We Harm Fellow Humans for the Sake of Kinship Love?: A Response to Critics.Qingping Liu - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):307-316.
  10.  53
    Emotionales Versus Rationales: A Comparison Between Confucius’ and Socrates’ Ethics.Qingping Liu - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (1):86-99.
    Socrates regards rational knowledge as the decisive factor of human life and even ascribes all virtues and moral actions to it, thereby stressing the ‘rationales’ of ethics. In contrast, Confucius regards kinship love as the decisive factor of human life and even grounds all virtues and moral actions on it, thereby stressing the ‘emotionales’ of ethics. Therefore, we should not lump them together by conceiving Confucius’ ethics also as based on ‘moral reason’.
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  11. Life as Logos and Tao: On Husserl's Ideas and the Comparative Study of Western and Chinese Philosophies.Qingping Liu - 1998 - Analecta Husserliana 52:33-56.
     
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  12. Life: The True, the Good and the Beautiful: A Comparative Study of Greek and Pre-Qin Philosophies.Qingping Liu - 2000 - Analecta Husserliana 67:323-338.
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  13.  22
    May One Murder the Innocent for the Sake of Faith in God or Filial Piety to Parents? A Comparative Study of Abraham’s and Guo’s Stories.Qingping Liu - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (1):43-58.
    Through a comparative analysis of the stories of Abraham and Guo, this article tries to argue that some particularistic claims of Christianity and Confucianism, which regard faith in God or filial piety to parents respectively as the sole ultimate principle of human life, may constitute the spiritual mainstay of such serious evils as murdering the innocent in certain in-depth paradoxes. Only by assigning a supreme position to their universal ideas of loving all humans through their self-transformations could the two ethico-religious (...)
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  14.  12
    The Global Ethic and Its Religious Grounds.Qingping Liu - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:199-205.
    The Declaration of the Parliament of the World’s Religions tries to establish a global ethic by jointly affirming some irrevocable and unconditional ethical directives on the grounds of their special ultimate realities. Through some case analysis of Christianity and Confucianism, this essay argues that, because these religions often assign a supreme position to these ultimate realities alone and make them trump anything else in a particularistic way, they have to subordinate those ethical directives to these realities. As a result, those (...)
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